The "What did you do to your B4 today" thread...

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
Took my B4 for state inspection today (it passed) and while driving home I noted it's just passed 290K miles. I recall that A3 clusters go back to 0 at 300K miles. Anyone know if B4 clusters do the same thing?
 

T-Roy

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2010
Location
Texas
TDI
'96 B4V
No, my B4 cluster kept counting right over no problem.



Funny story about the A3 cluster - I recently bought a '98 Jetta TDI for $500 from a clueless car person and upon initial inspection it was showing 76k miles and I was freaking out. The engine bay was clean so it looked possible. It hit me later that the A3 clusters roll over 300k and start over at 0 with the word 'Total' disappearing. I looked again and there was no 'Total' :(
 

Steve Addy

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Location
Iowa
TDI
97 Mk3
Installed group 49A battery today in the B3V conversion, it fit in the space with a little room to spare. I think it's 13.5" wide, cable length was not a problem either, then again I might be using Mk3 cables. This is not an AGM battery although I think have a group 49 or comparable AGM coming.

Bought a couple batteries via a friend who was at a swap meet last weekend, one is a 49ish sized AGM and the other is a group 95A sized lead acid battery (long one, 15.5") that I think will be used in a Benz that I've been needing one for. These were new batteries from some plant near Milwaukee that had a lot of covid related cancellations I guess.

Steve
 

jdulle

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Location
Ithaca, NY
TDI
96 B4, 97 B4
Wow one key for everything! That would be nice. One of my B4s could use this.
Next would be returning all the doors to the same color.
 

klazzic

Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Location
Denver
TDI
B4V TDI, B4V TDI
Did the ignition switch...a copper contact appeared below where I set all the parts. Clock spring sprung a bit as well. Put everything back together. No error codes and everything works as it should... not sure what the copper piece that had a touch of white grease went tooo? Come to think of it, the only thing I didn’t check was the horn.
 

jdulle

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Location
Ithaca, NY
TDI
96 B4, 97 B4
My friend came over and replaced the QA and top cover seal on my Silver 97 B4. Afterward I replaced the return lines between injectors, and the end cap. Happy to have it back for driving to work.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2018
Location
CT.
TDI
1996 B4 sedan
I chopped out the entire floor section on both sides from almost the bottom of the firewall back to the up curve to the rear seats. It was rough but i got it done. Nobody makes replacements so I made my own. Rock solid now and looks factory like underneath the car. Had to patchwork together the front seat mount points too but its all good now. Just about to hit 400k and now it will definitely live to see the 500k mark. Still my daily driver about 400miles a week. Also replaced all the rear brake lines from the master back at same time as the floors so im not worried about how scary they were everytime I panic stopped. Used all the factory clips to hold the brake lines and original fuel lines too. Also replaced all 4 struts with bilsteins and replaced one broke rear spring with a spare I had.


 

ToddA1

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 3, 2011
Location
NJ 08002
TDI
'96 B4V, '97 B4, '97 Jetta
Who needs stamping dies or bead rollers, lol.

Years ago, I remember following a thread on an air cooled forum. There was a guy in Asia who was restoring VWs hand making panels, like you did. big difference was his panels looked to be manufactured in a factory. Nobody believed him and a couple went out to see his shop. Very crude... no real machinery or paint booths. He was just using hammers and pieces of wood and metal as the forming dies, for the panels. It was pretty incredible.

-Todd
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2018
Location
CT.
TDI
1996 B4 sedan
My setup was pretty rudimentary. Ball peen hammer, recess groove on the bed/tailgate of my 49 gmc and a piece of rectangular tube to form the sub frame flanges. Its just as functional as a bead roller and it made it plenty strong and it was basically free. I highly doubt anyone will ever see the floors besides me because i will drive this car until its beyond dead. So i call it a win.
 

Steve Addy

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Location
Iowa
TDI
97 Mk3
My setup was pretty rudimentary. Ball peen hammer, recess groove on the bed/tailgate of my 49 gmc and a piece of rectangular tube to form the sub frame flanges. Its just as functional as a bead roller and it made it plenty strong and it was basically free. I highly doubt anyone will ever see the floors besides me because i will drive this car until its beyond dead. So i call it a win.
Kudos for building your own replacement floor pieces, rare now to see someone going to the effort today with the amount of throw away products out there. I am amazed when I go through the JY these days the newness of the cars / trucks in there, just pitched because it was easy. It tells you a lot about what's wrong in the auto industry. I ran across a 2015 Equinox (all of them are bad actually) and couldn't believe the amount of destruction inside with garbage everywhere.

Picked up a 1988 Jetta GLI 16v yesterday, the driver floor is unfortunately in bad shape but there are so many products out there now with the rarity of these (anymore) I really hate to consider parting it out...we will see. Funny thing is it had no factory options at all....lol.

Steve
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2018
Location
CT.
TDI
1996 B4 sedan
Yea well I already did all the body and paint on it so the floors were something I had to fix because I wasn’t gonna get rid it of after all that work I did previously. I agree its WAYYYYY easier to go buy something newer than to waste countless hours working on junks....but getting 900+mi per tank is hard to let go haha.
 
Top