Quantity adjuster issues

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
I have a 1998 VW Jetta tdi 1.9 manual. I had swapped another ahu motor into the car because my other motor was no good. As said I was doing a timing belt job because the motor had been sitting for some time, my father said it had ran strong when he had it, unfortunately he couldn’t find a body for it so the car sat. I swapped the motor into mine and as I had the motor out I did the timing belt, everything was normal, double checked all the sensors and all that, everything was good and time to start it, i went to turn it over and I heard a click and nothing happens, so I go look and check everything, it all looks good so I tried it a few more times and it did not sound good. Bare with me here, stupid me, I popped the timing belt cover to see what could’ve happened and you’ll never guess what? I forgot to pull the IP lock pin out, so as I was trying to start it the crankshaft was spinning, tore the sh*t out the belt around the crankshaft (I know, VERY VERY stupid mistake but what can I do now?). Anyways I called autozone and ordered a new TB. As I got everything off I noticed when the camshaft was at TDC the injection pump was off by almost 6-10 teeth, I had lined it back and locked everything back in place where it should be (and put the belt on and tensioned it down, everything was where it should be so I took the camshaft lock and IP lock out and threw everything back together and went to give it a try, cranks and cranks and cranks just fine but no start, I bled the injector lines and it wasn’t pushing fuel out like it normally should, very slowly. No start, plugged in my obd 2 scanner and code P1562 quantity adjuster-N146 upper limit stop value. Correct me if I’m wrong but the quantity adjuster is the big electronic piece on the side of the IP correct? Not sure how I would go about this, some help would be great.
 

Nevada_TDI

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 17, 2008
Location
Reno, sort of...
TDI
2001 Jetta TDI
If you do get it to start -which you should stop trying to do- pull the head and look at the pistons and check for dents. Maybe everything is okay, and maybe 10k miles down the road a valve drops and destroys the engine.
Pay the little bit now instead of a lot later on.
 

Steve Addy

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Location
Iowa
TDI
97 Mk3
With new belt installed you should always turn engine over by hand (with breaker bar or ratchet and 19mm socket) before trying to use the starter. That way things like pins left in IP sprocket get figured out before they do damage.

Check your lifters for cracks, if you see cracks you had a collision and you'll need to pull the head and have it redone.

Steve
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
With new belt installed you should always turn engine over by hand (with breaker bar or ratchet and 19mm socket) before trying to use the starter. That way things like pins left in IP sprocket get figured out before they do damage.

Check your lifters for cracks, if you see cracks you had a collision and you'll need to pull the head and have it redone.

Steve
My dad actually has a head that was rebuild for the same motor I could replace if they are bad but it’s a no start condition and everything is in time, I’m guessing it made contact but I will check the lifter for damage
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
Did you replace the valves after tearing the teeth off the belt at the crankshaft?
No I did not, after i bought a new belt and timed it I took a 3/4 socket and turned the crankshaft and felt nothing hitting after 2 full revolutions, I’ve never changed valves so that’ll be and experience
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
If you do get it to start -which you should stop trying to do- pull the head and look at the pistons and check for dents. Maybe everything is okay, and maybe 10k miles down the road a valve drops and destroys the engine.
Pay the little bit now instead of a lot later on.
I’m most likely going to pull the head and replace it with my dads, he has a fully rebuilt head sitting on his other car that I could use to replace
 

burn_your_money

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Location
North Bay, ON
TDI
99 Beetle, 96 B4V, 05 Passat wagon
Make sure to check the protrusion of each piston above the deck of the block. It is possible to bend the rods when the valves and pistons collide. Yours definitely did hit. It's impossible for the crank to turn while the cam is stationary and not hit valves, especially when the cam is set at TDC.

Like Steve Addy said, it's always good practice to turn the engine over by hand before using the starter.

You are correct, the QA is the large piece on the top of the pump. If you are 100% sure that this code is a result of this pump, and not from the previous engine, you should swap pumps while you have the head off. If you didn't clear all the codes when you did the engine swap, unfortunately you aren't going to be able to tell which pump is causing the code. The good news is you'll be a timing belt pro when this is all over.
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
Make sure to check the protrusion of each piston above the deck of the block. It is possible to bend the rods when the valves and pistons collide. Yours definitely did hit. It's impossible for the crank to turn while the cam is stationary and not hit valves, especially when the cam is set at TDC.

Like Steve Addy said, it's always good practice to turn the engine over by hand before using the starter.

You are correct, the QA is the large piece on the top of the pump. If you are 100% sure that this code is a result of this pump, and not from the previous engine, you should swap pumps while you have the head off. If you didn't clear all the codes when you did the engine swap, unfortunately you aren't going to be able to tell which pump is causing the code. The good news is you'll be a timing belt pro when this is all over.
I hadn’t cleared the codes before the swap but the quantity adjuster code was never there before I changed the engine, my father has a rebuilt IP also, it has been sitting for a few years with no fuel in it, would all the seals still be good since it’s never had fuel touch anything? I did the timing job on my other motor before it went bad and once I had everything back together I did turn the crankshaft, I’m not sure what in my mind made me forget to do it this time but at least now I’ll never forget that! As said I’m going to take the head off of my dads other one and replace the fuel pump while doing this so I can just knock it all out at once. Is there anything I should be looking for since the rebuilt head and IP have been sitting for a few years?
 

Steve Addy

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Location
Iowa
TDI
97 Mk3
I hadn’t cleared the codes before the swap but the quantity adjuster code was never there before I changed the engine, my father has a rebuilt IP also, it has been sitting for a few years with no fuel in it, would all the seals still be good since it’s never had fuel touch anything? I did the timing job on my other motor before it went bad and once I had everything back together I did turn the crankshaft, I’m not sure what in my mind made me forget to do it this time but at least now I’ll never forget that! As said I’m going to take the head off of my dads other one and replace the fuel pump while doing this so I can just knock it all out at once. Is there anything I should be looking for since the rebuilt head and IP have been sitting for a few years?
Well we can hope you find no lifter damage. I would still pull the head bolts in sequence just in case the damage is not too bad.

I have seen QA code problems, don't remember the actual code, from an IP that didn't want to prime. Once the prime situation was figured out and resolved the code was cleared and didn't come back. And that actually was following a engine swap too...lol

Steve
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
Well we can hope you find no lifter damage. I would still pull the head bolts in sequence just in case the damage is not too bad.

I have seen QA code problems, don't remember the actual code, from an IP that didn't want to prime. Once the prime situation was figured out and resolved the code was cleared and didn't come back. And that actually was following a engine swap too...lol

Steve
I’m going to look at the head before I replace anything, so while I was trying to start the car before, it would not prime, could that mean the QA isn’t giving off the correct reading and it needs to be replaced? I have to extra QA I can change out if that could be the problem
 

louis11018

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Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
am I able to take off the QA bolts and pull it out? Or would I have to take apart the IP and remove it?
 

burn_your_money

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Location
North Bay, ON
TDI
99 Beetle, 96 B4V, 05 Passat wagon
You can unbolt the top bolts and remove the QA. It needs to go back in the exact same spot for the car to run correctly though. Look up "hammer mod" to get an idea of what you are doing. I don't recommend removing the QA though, especially right now with a non running engine.

If the rebuilt pump was stored in a dry location, it should be fine.
 

Nevada_TDI

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 17, 2008
Location
Reno, sort of...
TDI
2001 Jetta TDI
The four bolts on the top of the pump give access to the quantity adjuster, but before you do that, make marks around the perimeter so you can align them when you put everything back together.
If there appears to be anything in there that appears it should not be there, I have used mild aerosol type cleaners to get the gunk out.
I suggest you remove the fuel from the QA area before you dig around in there.
The ring on the shaft needs to slide freely back and forth and it locates on a pin moved by the magnet, if the pin does seat back into the ring, the engine will start but ignore any input by the throttle; it will idle smoothly ( provided the other setting are fixed first ) I have been through this myself, that is how I know.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 27, 2003
Location
Stafford Virginia 22556
TDI
96 glx variant tdi
To be more clear, there are either 4 or 7 bolts in total to be removed to replace/remove the iq assembly. There are 3 torx bolts plus the special three-sided anti tamper bolt in the top cover. Removing that cover just shows the condition of the pump, i.e. whether it's rusty or clean. Beneath that cover are three more torx bolts. Removing those three and the three-sided anti tamper bolt (if not removed previously) will allow the iq assembly to be lifted off of the pump. There is a bracket on the pump holding the cable in place, use a torx bit to loosen that (DON'T LOSE THE SCREW). Use a can of brake clean and compressed air to clean the outside of the pump as well as possible. Like others have mentioned, scribe a mark, use a punch to make witness marks, to allow placement of the iq assembly back onto the pump body in the exact same spot it was when you took it off.
 
Last edited:

Steve Addy

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Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Location
Iowa
TDI
97 Mk3
I think you're jumping the gun on the IP QA situation.

As I told a friend who did an engine swap in a B4V a few months ago when he couldn't get the pump to prime, if you pull the top off the pump to look inside, exactly what do you gain?

He was getting a QA error code that I didn't recognize, but I was not convinced that the pump was a problem. I felt it was more reasonable to figure out why the pump wasn't able to be primed and resolve that, before we start declaring the pump INOP and opening it up.

The consequences of opening the IP to have look are pretty significant since we know that once you disturb the QA it requires lots of fussing in order to get the car started again, and so why would we add that problem to the mix when it might not be necessary?

Since the car hasn't run yet, identifying the IP as a problem is premature IMO. I would not open the IP and add that problem to the mix at this point.

When you've resolved the cylinder head issue and get to the point where the car will be started then I would address the IP issue if there actually is one.

Steve
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
I think you're jumping the gun on the IP QA situation.

As I told a friend who did an engine swap in a B4V a few months ago when he couldn't get the pump to prime, if you pull the top off the pump to look inside, exactly what do you gain?

He was getting a QA error code that I didn't recognize, but I was not convinced that the pump was a problem. I felt it was more reasonable to figure out why the pump wasn't able to be primed and resolve that, before we start declaring the pump INOP and opening it up.

The consequences of opening the IP to have look are pretty significant since we know that once you disturb the QA it requires lots of fussing in order to get the car started again, and so why would we add that problem to the mix when it might not be necessary?

Since the car hasn't run yet, identifying the IP as a problem is premature IMO. I would not open the IP and add that problem to the mix at this point.

When you've resolved the cylinder head issue and get to the point where the car will be started then I would address the IP issue if there actually is one.

Steve
My father had said he didn’t think it was the pump either, I haven’t been able to do anything yet because I would need a sprocket puller to get it off, anyways I think I read something in a forum about pulling it or bump starting it and force the fuel through? Although my other problem with that it, my clutch pedal goes straight to the floor, I topped it off with DOT-3 and tried to bleed it but I couldn’t get any further than that, no fluid was coming out, would there be any suggestions for that? I heard they’re a b*tch to bleed, if that problem was solved I could then bump start the car. As for the code coming up it is P1562 quantity adjuster-N146 upper limit stop value
 

Steve Addy

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Location
Iowa
TDI
97 Mk3
BTW, when my friend finally figured out how to prime the pump successfully the QA code went away and never came back. I'm not saying that your case is identical, just that I don't think your attention should be on the IP yet.

As for bump starting, I don't recommend it and it certainly won't do any good if the IP is insufficiently primed.

Good luck and keep us posted about what's going on!!

Steve
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
BTW, when my friend finally figured out how to prime the pump successfully the QA code went away and never came back. I'm not saying that your case is identical, just that I don't think your attention should be on the IP yet.

As for bump starting, I don't recommend it and it certainly won't do any good if the IP is insufficiently primed.

Good luck and keep us posted about what's going on!!

Steve
Any input on bleeding the clutch? Just goes straight to the floor and can’t seem to get it bled
 

Steve Addy

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Location
Iowa
TDI
97 Mk3
Any input on bleeding the clutch? Just goes straight to the floor and can’t seem to get it bled
Bleeding the clutch has never been an issue for me. The way it's setup it should be an easy process, the line is short and the bleeder is below the MC. I don't understand why so many claim to have a problem with it. You have to keep the brake reservoir fluid high for the process to succeed, but otherwise I don't understand how it is that this always seems to be a complaint. Have you pulled the slave to see if the pushrod and boot is ok?

If you can't get it to bleed you're going to need to find the problem component and replace it, it might be a bad slave.

As for ninedee_golf_td's suggestion, I have never had any luck with pressure bleeding so I don't bother with it anymore.

Steve
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
Bleeding the clutch has never been an issue for me. The way it's setup it should be an easy process, the line is short and the bleeder is below the MC. I don't understand why so many claim to have a problem with it. You have to keep the brake reservoir fluid high for the process to succeed, but otherwise I don't understand how it is that this always seems to be a complaint. Have you pulled the slave to see if the pushrod and boot is ok?

If you can't get it to bleed you're going to need to find the problem component and replace it, it might be a bad slave.

As for ninedee_golf_td's suggestion, I have never had any luck with pressure bleeding so I don't bother with it anymore.

Steve
It could be the slave but it seemed to work just fine before I swapped the motor? I’ll have to check it out
 

Steve Addy

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Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Location
Iowa
TDI
97 Mk3
Pressure bleeding is the answer.
I take my prior comment back, today I had to repair a clutch master on a 97 Passat TDI and found the only way to get it to bleed was to apply a minor amount of pressure to the brake reservoir.

Made all the difference in the world.

Steve
 

louis11018

Active member
Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Location
Arcade ny
TDI
98 Jetta tdi ahu
I take my prior comment back, today I had to repair a clutch master on a 97 Passat TDI and found the only way to get it to bleed was to apply a minor amount of pressure to the brake reservoir.

Made all the difference in the world.

Steve
I haven’t had time to mess with it at all but I will have try that when I do.
 
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