How-To: Defuel 09 Jetta after misfuel

paramedick

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor
Joined
Jul 29, 2001
Location
Versailles, Kentucky
TDI
2015 Audi Q5 TDI, 2000 New Beetle
"I grabbed the green handle. All diesel fuel handles are green, right?" Around here, diesel fuel pumps can have green, black, or yellow handles. You filled up your car with gasoline..:eek:

Hopefully you realized it before you started the car, or shut if off when it started running roughly. In any case, do not restart the car. Trailer it to wherever you need to to repair the car.

We all know how critical lubricity is to the HPFP in the CBEA cars. Gasoline has no lubricity value. Your fuel system may already be damaged. You may experience a future HPFP failure. Please, no comments here about future failures.

Fuel system must be completely purged of contaminated fuel. This how-to will show you the easiest method to accomplish this.

Disclaimer. This was my experience. Your experience may differ. I can take no responsibility for your work or results.

Assuming you are removing gasoline from the car, be aware of the ability of gasoline to generate fumes easily. Work in a well-ventilated area. No open flames. I suggest using worklights that won't generate a spark if bulb is broken. Clean any spills immediately, and put fuel-soaked materials outside. Dispose of waste fuel in a responsible manner.

Tools/materials needed
Mityvac, preferably with large collection bottle
cable operated hose clamp pliers
T30 torx driver
small hammer
brass drift
6 foot of 1/4 inch fuel line
5/16 inch brass barbed connector
4 x 5 gallon containers for contaminated fuel

1) remove the T30 torx screws x 5 that secure the lid to the fuel filter cannister. Secure the lid out of the way with a zip tie to the fuel lines. Remove contaminated fuel filter and set aside. Using mityvac, remove fuel from fuel filter cannister. Use a lint-free absorbent material to dry out cannister. Examine material, fuel, and fuel filter for metal sparklies. If you see sparklies, your HPFP has already been damaged. Take the car somewhere for further repairs. Alternate method: Remove fuel cannister from car to clean if that is your desire.

2) reinstall fuel filter cannister lid loosely with 2-3 screws to provide a stable work surface for next steps.

3) remove the fuel line from the fuel tank to the cannister lid. Picture below shows which line. Cable operated clamp pliers work great, regular pliers not so well due to new clamp design. Connect fuel line to 1/4 inch fuel line with the brass barbed fitting. Route to container for contaminated fuel.





4) Connect VCDS. Turn ignition on. Select 01 engine and open field. Click on basic settings. Enter 035 in left most window and select that field. Click the "on/off button" at top of VCDS window. Lift pump will begin to operate. Allow it to run until it is no longer pumping fuel to waste fuel container, about 1 minute. Allow lift pump to rest 2-3 minutes and repeat above. Three cycles of lift pump will substantially fill a 5 gallon container. When container is filled, put cap on it and set outside for safety. Swap in new container. If tank is full, it will take 4 containers.

5) When fuel is no longer being pumped from the 1/4 inch hose to waste fuel container, click the "on/off" button again to shut off lift pump. Turn off ignition. Leave hose connected to tank line and run to waste fuel container.

6) Remove back seat. Peel back carpeting that covers fuel tank sender/lift pump and secure out of the way by method of your choice. Remove wiring boot from plastic cover. Lift up plastic cover (no screws, friction fit). Unplug wiring from lift pump and remove plastic cover. Move wiring out of the way.






7) Clean top of sending unit/lift pump. It will be quite dirty.

8) Release two fuel lines from the sending unit. There is a release clip you push to do so. Remember where they go. Move fuel lines out of the way the best you can.



9) Use a permanent marker to make orientation marks between the fuel tank opening, retaining ring, and sending unit. Do this in several places. There is a quality control sticker that may be present that can act as one orientation mark.

10) Retaining ring is metal with notches at regular intervals. The notches mate with bent tabs on fuel tank opening. Take your brass drift and hammer, and tap the retaining ring counter-clockwise until it releases. Picture above shows ring/tab relationship when it is released. Remove retaining ring and set aside.

11) Lift up on sender unit/lift pump and remove slowly. Remember to tilt it to clear the fuel level float. Remove from car. There is fuel in the sender unit, so spread some absorbent materials to catch drippage, and have something to set the sender unit on to remove from car. Empty all fuel from the sender unit. Clean as necessary. Set aside in safe place.





12) You will have less than one gallon of fuel left in tank. It has to come out. Choose your favorite lint-free absorbent material and start soaking up the fuel. Reach into the tank and make sure you clean out all the nooks and crannies. Hint, Pig brand absorbent pads do a great job in absorbing the fuel (available at NAPA and other FLAPS).



13) Ensure that the rubber gasket that seals the sender unit in place is in correct postion. It it inserted into the tank opening, and it's "U" shaped design is retained both above and below the opening. You can see gasket in above image.

14) Insert sender unit/lift pump into tank opening. Remember, you have to tilt it to clear the float arm. Set retaining ring in position, noting your reference marks. Push down on the fuel sender to seat it, and turn retaining ring slightly to engage the tabs. Use your brass drift to tap it clockwise to align your reference marks. Plug fuel lines back onto proper nipples. Insert wiring connector thru plastic cover and reconnect to sender unit. Secure plastic cover in place. Secure wiring boot to plastic cover.

15) Reinstall seat

16) Add fresh diesel fuel to fuel tank. At least 5 gallons so lift pump doesn't have to work so hard. I suggest 8-10 gallons. Add some type of lubricity additive to the fuel. 1 quart of B100 would be perfect. I used 16 ounces of Stanadyne.

17) Using VCDS procedure above, purge fuel lines of contaminated fuel into waste container. Hit stop button when you get pure diesel fuel. You will notice a color change.

18) Remove barbed fitting from tank fuel line, and secure it to the fuel filter lid and clamp it.

19) Install new fuel filter and gaskets. Vent fuel filter cannister as described above, using new vent screw seal that came with the fuel filter

20) Secure lid on fuel filter cannister. Remove vent screw from fuel filter cannister lid. Use VCDS procedure to fill fuel filter until fuel is expelled from vent. Replace vent screw.

21) Remove fuel return line from fuel filter. Connect 1/4 inch fuel line to nipple on the fuel cannister lid. Route to waste container. Using VCDS procedure above, purge the fuel system of contaminated fuel and air. You will need to run the lift pump at least one full cycle to purge the fuel system and the fuel filter cannister of any contaminated fuel. Remove 1/4 inch hose, and reinstall return line onto fuel filter cannister lid. Put clamp back in place.



22) Remove fuel filter cannister lid. Remove fuel and examine for metal sparklies.

23) Start the car. It may take 10-15 seconds of cranking to remove gasoline from fuel injectors. Car will start roughly, and smooth out within 5-10 seconds. Let idle 1-2 minutes. You might get a stumble if there are any air bubbles.

24) Using VCDS, clear any codes. You will have a code for the fuel level sender, and multiple cylinder misfire codes if car was run with gasoline.

25) Test drive 10-15 miles. Car should run smoothly without stumbling.
 
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LITTLE-LARRY

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Location
St Clairsville,OH
TDI
2010 JSW
The only flaw I can see is that running the VCDS fuel priming program to empty the fuel tank also runs the elec. boost pump. Unless you can unplug the boost pump and still run the VCDS fuel priming program. I don't think it would be a good thing to run the boost pump with no fuel,since you are dumping the fuel into waste containers before fuel gets to the boost pump. Maybe it would be better to disconnect the fuel line after the boost pump and connect your barbed fitting and hose to the out fuel supply line of the boost pump.

Also once the fuel sending unit is out of the tank it is easy to just mity vac all remaining fuel from the tank.

Good info and detailed write up with pics.

Just a thought.
LARRY
 

paramedick

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor
Joined
Jul 29, 2001
Location
Versailles, Kentucky
TDI
2015 Audi Q5 TDI, 2000 New Beetle
The only flaw I can see is that running the VCDS fuel priming program to empty the fuel tank also runs the elec. boost pump. Unless you can unplug the boost pump and still run the VCDS fuel priming program. I don't think it would be a good thing to run the boost pump with no fuel,since you are dumping the fuel into waste containers before fuel gets to the boost pump. Maybe it would be better to disconnect the fuel line after the boost pump and connect your barbed fitting and hose to the out fuel supply line of the boost pump.

Also once the fuel sending unit is out of the tank it is easy to just mity vac all remaining fuel from the tank.

Good info and detailed write up with pics.

Just a thought.
LARRY
Thanks for comments. Not enough fuel depth left in tank to use mityvac. We tried.

As for the boost pump, hmmmm. I need to look.
 

greengeeker

Vendor
Joined
Feb 8, 2006
Location
Cambridge, MN
TDI
2002 Jetta GLS
lost my post...

My $.02:

- You still need to purge the filter to tank return line. Step 19 will push contaminated fuel into the tank full of fresh diesel.

- In step 20 I believe you will need to run the boost pump to purge the low pressure side of the HPFP.

- Prior to starting the car I would prefer to drain the fuel rail. I'm not sure what the best method might be - maybe disconnect all the injector harnesses and crank although I'm not sure the HPFP will generate rail pressure if it doesn't see injectors. All of this would be done with the HPFP to filter return line flowing into a waste bucket.
 

Plus 3 Golfer

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2008
Location
ARIZONA
TDI
Und tschüss! 2009 Jetta 12/23/2012
The only flaw I can see is that running the VCDS fuel priming program to empty the fuel tank also runs the elec. boost pump. Unless you can unplug the boost pump and still run the VCDS fuel priming program. I don't think it would be a good thing to run the boost pump with no fuel,since you are dumping the fuel into waste containers before fuel gets to the boost pump. Maybe it would be better to disconnect the fuel line after the boost pump and connect your barbed fitting and hose to the out fuel supply line of the boost pump.

Also once the fuel sending unit is out of the tank it is easy to just mity vac all remaining fuel from the tank.

Good info and detailed write up with pics.

Just a thought.
LARRY
Are you sure about the boost pump? I don't feel like checking with VCDS now but when I primed my fuel system with VCDS a number of months ago, I thought I was able to operate the lift pump and boost pump individually in VCDS.

Edit: Checked both the Output Test and Basic Settings 35. Under the output test one can individually select either the lift pump or the boost pump. The pump selected will cycle on/off continuously (I stopped test after about 30 seconds or so) on about a 4 second period (2 seconds on and 2 seconds off). And yes the basic settings 35 runs both pumps continuously.
 
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DanG144

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Location
Chapin, South Carolina, USA
TDI
2005 A4 Jetta 5spd
The site must have crashed. I posted on this thread this morning. I don't think I used any bad words.

Great post. Thanks for the time and obvious effort to help us out.

I would try the OUTPUT tests instead of basic settings 35 (which does run both the lift and aux booster pumps - just what you want most of the time.) The output tests let you run either the lift or the aux pump alone. I am not sure if they run quite as long as in the basic settings test.

GG, I think his flushing prevents the fuel rail bad fuel from going back to the tank (if I read it right.)

But I would do the fuel rail flush differently. I would install the fuel filter at step 19 so that I never put unfiltered fuel to the rail. I would divert the return fuel from before the fuel filter to my waste jug (I would have to plug the line off of the fuel filter, too), so that the contaminated fuel never mixed in the fuel filter. Then do the basic settings 35 three times. Then run the engine for a minute. Then restore the return line. Then test drive, clear codes, etc.

I think this would do a creditable job of flushing the contaminated fuel out of the engine.
 
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mgj2727

Active member
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Location
Los Angeles
TDI
2010 Jetta Sportwagon TDI & 2013 Passat TDI SEL PREM
Big question for this topic. I put 3.22 gallons of premuim unleaded into my 2010 JSW TDI today. I realized quite quickly, stopped pumping, didn't start the car and had it towed to a VW dealer. The quote is about $800 to drop the tank, drain it, replace fuel filters. And another $115 for a diagnostic. Does $900+ sound reasonable or was I a captive audience?
 

dieseldorf

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Oct 11, 2000
Location
MA
TDI
ex- 1996 wagon, ex-2000 Jetta
Someone has a boat pmt coming due!

Welcome aboard, mg :)
 

Plus 3 Golfer

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2008
Location
ARIZONA
TDI
Und tschüss! 2009 Jetta 12/23/2012
Big question for this topic. I put 3.22 gallons of premuim unleaded into my 2010 JSW TDI today. I realized quite quickly, stopped pumping, didn't start the car and had it towed to a VW dealer. The quote is about $800 to drop the tank, drain it, replace fuel filters. And another $115 for a diagnostic. Does $900+ sound reasonable or was I a captive audience?
You probably want the dealer to do it for warranty purposes especially since the dealer now knows of the fuel contamination. Also, the dealer will dispose of the contamined fuel for you. Ask the dealer why they need to drop the tank? Assume a labor rate of $115 / hour, that's about a 7 hour job to evacuate and purge the fuel system which seems a little long if the dealer would use paramedick's procedure. There really should be no contaminated fuel in the FF housing and beyond since you didn't start the car. Unlike the car paramedick worked on, I'd expect your car to start right up with no issues after his procedure.

Having said that since you didn't start the car, paramedick's procedure should be all you need to do (no tank drop). It's actually quite simple but you need an easy way to operate the pumps (VCDS). Sounds like you don't have a lot of fuel in the tank so 2 five gallon containers should be adequate. Buy a VCDS ($300ish) and save $600.

Last option might be to find a TDI guru near you that's willing to tackle the job and get a quote from him using paramedick's procedure.
 

LITTLE-LARRY

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Location
St Clairsville,OH
TDI
2010 JSW
I'm thinking if I misfueled with a no start. I would try to remove the gas/fuel mixture without running the lift pump. Why run gas through the lift pump and supply line if you don't have to. If the fuel level is low enough (1/2 tank or lower) I think I would just opt to remove the lift pump and use a topside oil change pump to remove the contaminated fuel. You may have to wipe out the little remaining,but it can all be done through the lift pump mounting hole. Then just reinstall the lift pump and add 5 or 10 gallons of diesel,run VCDS to prime and the car should be good to go.

A misfuel with start would require a good deal more work and effort to try and remove as much gas/fuel from the fuel system as possible. Especially the rail.

With a full tank of fuel. I wonder how much you could vac out using the return fitting on the fuel sending unit? That way you are not running the pump and simply sucking fuel through the return fitting at the sending unit.

I think you could probably get the fuel in the tank down to at least 1/2 using this method.

I'd do a no start defuel for $200 and be happy as could be. Its pretty easy and staight forward and should take an hour and a half tops.

LARRY
 
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Elfnmagik

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Location
Sherman's Ashtray
TDI
Currently De-Dub'd
If the fuel level is low enough (1/2 tank or lower) I think I would just opt to remove the lift pump and use a topside oil change pump to remove the contaminated fuel. You may have to wipe out the little remaining,but it can all be done through the lift pump mounting hole. Then just reinstall the lift pump and add 5 or 10 gallons of diesel,run VCDS to prime and the car should be good to go.LARRY
I was thinking the same. I'm wondering if you would even need to prime with VCDS. Plug the lines when the lift pump is removed for cleanup so there would be good diesel in the lines from the lift pump on to the engine. I'd think it would fire right up and begin pumping new fuel immediatly, No?
 

greengeeker

Vendor
Joined
Feb 8, 2006
Location
Cambridge, MN
TDI
2002 Jetta GLS
GG, I think his flushing prevents the fuel rail bad fuel from going back to the tank (if I read it right.)
Pertinent high level summary:
(3) Remove tank to filter supply line and direct to waste container
(4) Empty tank via lift pump
(5) Leave tank to filter supply line directed to waste container
(6-15) Manually remove remaining contaminated fuel from tank
(16) Add diesel to tank
(17) Purge contaminated fuel in tank to filter supply line (It says "lines" but this is the only one going to the waste container)
(18) Connect tank to filter supply line back onto the fuel filter
(19) Prime filter with fresh diesel

As I understand it, the return line is never purged prior to step 19 which would push the bad fuel back into the tank. :confused:

In the past I've used a MityVac to suck fuel from this line. Maybe hook a coupling up to the filter supply line (from the lift pump) and use it to purge the return line? Problem is how would you get the bad fuel into a container with those lines being so short?

But I would do the fuel rail flush differently. I would install the fuel filter at step 19 so that I never put unfiltered fuel to the rail. I would divert the return fuel from before the fuel filter to my waste jug (I would have to plug the line off of the fuel filter, too), so that the contaminated fuel never mixed in the fuel filter. Then do the basic settings 35 three times. Then run the engine for a minute. Then restore the return line. Then test drive, clear codes, etc.

I think this would do a creditable job of flushing the contaminated fuel out of the engine.
I agree. Do we know how much pressure is needed to get past the HP check valve? I guess there's only one way to find out :eek:.
 

DanG144

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Location
Chapin, South Carolina, USA
TDI
2005 A4 Jetta 5spd
In Paramedick's original post, he had the return line from the filter to the tank dumping into the waste can in step 20. So the bad fuel never made it back to the tank. At least that is the way I read it.
 

mgj2727

Active member
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Location
Los Angeles
TDI
2010 Jetta Sportwagon TDI & 2013 Passat TDI SEL PREM
Quick question - I just got a call from my dealer. He said that VofA recommends that they put in a new fuel pump (at $380). Even though the car was never started after the unleaded gas was pumped into the car (3.22 gallons only), that's what they recommend. Do you guys think I should pass on the fuel pump? The rest of the service was $410, which is draining the tank, replacing filters, etc.
 

manual_tranny

Smyth Performance- Intern
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Location
New Bedford, MA
TDI
2001 Golf @182K; 2000 Jetta @290K
If they are talking about your transfer fuel pump (lift pump), this one is in the tank and my guess is there could be (edit: but almost definitely is not), minor damage if the key was turned to 'on' even if the engine was not started. I would think that if they were so worried they might try hooking it up to an electrical source and a well lubricated diesel source to purge the gasoline out of the lines. If it purges the lines and works without any funny noises, why not leave it in?

There is also an auxiliary pump between the in-tank pump and the high pressure fuel pump. This should also be fine if the key was not turned to "on" and if they drained the system proplerly.

If they are talking about replacing your High-Pressure fuel pump, then run away as fast as you can. They should cost more than $380 though, so unlikely...
 
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dzcad90

Rolex & gin
Joined
Mar 15, 1999
Location
Joliet, IL USA
TDI
Jetta - 97 (RIP), '03 (Sold), '09
How much fuel are we talking about in the return line.. Maybe 10-12 ounces at most, with a good portion of that likely being diesel? I think with anything more than a half tank of quality diesel with lubricity enhancement this might be a non issue.
 
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joetdi

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2008
Location
Midwest
TDI
2-2002 Jettas W/Auto
How much fuel are we talking about in the return line.. Maybe 10-12 ounces at most, with a good portion of that likely being diesel? I think with anything more than a half tank of quality diesel with lubricity enhancement this might be a non issue.
I agree, and I would forget pulling the tank unit. The half gallon left in there is nothing when you fill the tank after the job anyways. Dump a little low ash 2-cycle in there if you're worried.
 

MikeS_18

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 18, 2005
Location
Bow, NH
TDI
'03 Jetta Wagon, '13 Passat SE, '64 Ford Econoline
So a side question on this:

An ALH was filled with gas and run until the car died (not my car). That was 5000 miles ago. Fuel system completely flushed out, new filter. No other replacements.

So this car is:
A) Probably okay. You would have seen issues by now, or
B) Ticking bomb. Prepare to replace [insert part names here]

thanks.
 

DanG144

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Location
Chapin, South Carolina, USA
TDI
2005 A4 Jetta 5spd
Probably ok, expect no issues, could shorten the IP life a bit, probably not severely. Same for a PD, but it would shorten the life of the tandem pump, Probably not severely.

This is obviously just my opinion, I have never done this, but have helped folks over the phone who have. Three years on an ALH after misfueling and no apparent impact. Only a year for the PD.
 

edbowen

New member
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Location
Pelham
TDI
2009 TDI Jetta
Without VCDS..

Thanks for the great writeup. I had the exact problem happen. Wife doesn't drive the TDI often and I was out of town. She filled with Gas and drove the 2 miles to the house. I'm assuming the car will run about 1.9 miles on the fuel in the lines. Starting running rough as she pulled into drive.. Never stopped running though. She realized as she cut the engine what had happened.

When I returned home I was faced with towing and a potential $5,000-$8,000 repair. Called the insurance agent and the good hands people of AllState said it wasn't covered. So I did it myself after reading your post.

Fortunately,, there were no signs of metal in the Fuel Filter so this worked for me. No guarantee it will work for you.

My fix did involve a couple of different steps.

1 - I don't have VCDS. Since this is used primarily to run the lift pump, another method was used. The left and right terminals on the lift pump will actuate the pump if 12vdc is applied. Need to put positive power on left when on passenger side or the pump will run backwards. Also,, remember,, the pump lines are full of Gas. Rinse first with Water,, and put a hose on the output line and run the fuel out away from the potential spark of the 12vdc. Fill the reservoir with diesel to flush the pump lines. I used a small battery charger to supply the 12vdc.

2 - Rather then use the lift pump to drain the tank, I siphoned the fuel into another container,, then put in my Gas Vehicle. The minimal amount of diesel won't hurt the gas car. Turkey baster works great to remove the left over gas out of fuel tank and fuel filter.

3- with the lift pump pulled from the vehicle, direct the supply lines back into the tank,, then apply airpressure to the lines going into the fuel filter, this will force the gas back into the tank.

4- after tank is clean,, put diesel in tank, in fuel filter reserviour, in lift pump reservior, then re-install lift pump and lines. Add the lubricant as desribed.. I used Lucas diesel additive.

5 - using the 12 vdc, run the lift pump until diesel is pumping into the fuel filter reserviour. install new fuel filter and tighten cap.

6 - remove low pressure line from hpfp. this connects hpfp to fuel filter.

7- run lift pump with 12vdc until diesel is running out of this line.

8- put lucas additive directly into line and port into hpfp,, replace line, plug lift pump in and start car.
 

tdiatlast

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jan 21, 2009
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
TDI
2009 Sportwagen (boughtback); 2014 Passat TDI SEL (boughtback)
Sorry about the mis-fuel.

I hope you plan to monitor your Fuel Filter. If it were my car, I'd check the FF after the 1st tank (500miles?), again at 1k, maybe 3k.

Recent post of an HPFP at 59k miles. I think it's the "oldest" HPFP reported here. Still searching for the cause of HPFP failure, and the only thing we can visually monitor is the FF.

Keep us posted.
 

longballlumber

New member
Joined
Sep 15, 2010
Location
Clawson, MI
TDI
2010 Jetta SportWagon
Good morning guys,

Boy, am I glad I found this thread. I will try and keep this story quick.

Yesterday I filled up my 2010 JSW TDI (just under 7000 miles) with “Off-Highway” Diesel. This happen at the same place I have been filling up since I bought the car. There were 2 islands and 4 pumps (1 on each side of the island). Well to my luck 3 of the pumps were ULSD (15 ppm) and the other LSD (500 ppm). This is another story.

The long and short of it is, I work in a shop that has mechanics that work on large military vehicle and one of the mechanics used to work at a VW dealer as a diesel mechanic. After talking to him, he offered to help siphon the LSD out of the tank and into a co-workers truck.

Much like this “how to” pulled up the rear seat to access the float/sending unit. The fuel line (to pump/engine) and the return line were pulled and the float/sending unit pulled. Using a siphon hand pump we transferred the LSD to my co-workers truck. Finally put everything back together as before.

I immediately went down to the filling station and filled up with the correct ULSD. On my drive home (about 3-4 miles after the ULSD fill up) I noticed a buzzing sound coming from the engine well. After some investigation it’s the electric fuel pump near the driver’s side fire wall.

I ended up driving it to the dealership, I popped the hood and the tech said “it’s the fuel pump (electric not HPFP). Order him another one.” That was it they sent me on my way and told me it was OK to drive.

The question is, does this system need to pressurized? If there was a little air in the line shouldn’t it work itself out? The weird thing is the buzzing sound doesn’t start on immediate start up, it’s only after the car has been driven for a few min or a mile or so.

Any advice?
 

dweisel

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Location
Wheeling, West Virginia
TDI
dweisel isn't diesel anymore!
Actually to have done it correctly the fuel system should have been primed using VCDS to remove any air that may have gotten into the fuel system. Anytime the fuel system is opened it should be primed with VCDS. You really would have been okay to have run the OFF ROAD LSD for one tank and just kept dilluting it with ULSD as you used the LSD. If it was even LSD it may have just been ULSD OFF ROAD. Not a lot of LSD out there anymore.

Hopefully once the dealership replaces the aux fuel pump all will be well.

dweisel
 
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longballlumber

New member
Joined
Sep 15, 2010
Location
Clawson, MI
TDI
2010 Jetta SportWagon
Thanks for the reply dweisel, I really do appreciate it. I agree that I probably jumped the gun removing the Non-Highway stuff. This my first TDI and I was a little overwhelmed with the all of the new "info" on regarding diesel powered VW's

Since i have your attention and if you don't mind answering...

The car is a little hesitant when starting now and I did get a check engine last night, but has since gone away with shutting down and restarting.

I know the Dealer Tech said it would be OK to drive, but do you think I am at risk to damage anything else if I continue to drive until the aux fuel pump is installed. I see no difference in driving besides the noise from the aux fuel pump and starting the engine?

Again, thanks for your help. I really do appreciate it!

Mike
 

thesearcherman

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2011
Location
Richmond,Va.
TDI
2001 Golf TDI
If it were me, I would never let the dealer know I had put the wrong fuel in. Now, it is in a computer that VWOA and all other dealers can access. This may be a problem with future warranty repairs, as they can blame any related (they will determined what is related) problems on having put the wrong fuel in the car in the past, and shortened component life. One will not be able to prove the car was not run with the wrong fuel.
 
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