Winterized diesel fuel

Tdijarhead

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Location
Lawrenceville PA
TDI
2003 TDI Jetta Daughters Car, 2001 TDI Beetle, Daughters car, 2005 Golf TDI Mine, all 5 spds
It hurts your mileage and costs more.

But you will not be stranded alongside the road with a car that does not run or barely runs with no power.
 

scooperhsd

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Location
Kansas City KS
TDI
NB, 2000, RED(5 Speed conversion) 2015 Golf SE
Clyde - are you down in FL ? If so, it's not very likely that you will see much "winterized diesel locally. OTOH - if you want to make a trip north this winter - you WILL get it when you fill up with local fuel. In fact, one of my points about winter driving is that if you're going from a warmer location to a colder location, that you fill up with local fuel before shutting down for the night, so your car doesn't have issues starting / running due to fuel.


You can also buy additives that can help lower the gel point and deal with water in the fuel . One that i use is Powerservice in the WHITE containers - the Silver is to improve running on summer fuel. There are other fuel treatments out there that will also work.
 

Riflesmith

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 16, 1999
Location
Lovell, WY
TDI
2003 Jetta Wagon TDI 6M, 2015 Golf TDI 6A
Does winterized diesel fuel offer any benefits other than its lower gelling temperature?
Winterized diesel fuel is supposed to mean fuel with a lowered CFPP and gel point via anti-gel additives. These additives shouldn't effect fuel energy content.

Winter blend diesel fuel has #1 diesel added in some quantity. This is a reliable way to lower CFPP and gel point, but does reduce the energy content of the fuel, resulting in lower MPG.

All of that being stated, buying diesel fuel, winter or summer, is a crap-shoot. You never really know what you're getting.
 

scooperhsd

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Location
Kansas City KS
TDI
NB, 2000, RED(5 Speed conversion) 2015 Golf SE
Winterized diesel fuel is supposed to mean fuel with a lowered CFPP and gel point via anti-gel additives. These additives shouldn't effect fuel energy content.

Winter blend diesel fuel has #1 diesel added in some quantity. This is a reliable way to lower CFPP and gel point, but does reduce the energy content of the fuel, resulting in lower MPG.

All of that being stated, buying diesel fuel, winter or summer, is a crap-shoot. You never really know what you're getting.

About the Diesel #1 - not necessarily all winter blends. It is one method to lower the gell point, but there are other ways to lower it as well. You can get #1 in ULSD as well as #2. But the points about always buying your fuel at a station with high turnover (always important, but even more so in winter) also apply.
 
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