Who’s going to Tesla after their current TDI?

bigsexyTDI

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2005
Location
Kentucky
TDI
'98 NB, '04 Jetta
I went the opposite direction. In 2014 I bought the cheapest, most basic car available, the Mitsubishi Mirage. It isn't for everyone, but it is the most honest car on the market. It is exactly what it is billed to be. Affordable, reliable transportation that offers outstanding fuel economy along with basic creature comforts such as Bluetooth and power accessories. That 2014 was purchased brand new for just under $11k, and performed flawlessly with nothing other than basic maintenance until it met a horrible fate at 130k in a T-bone accident (which it kept me very safe in and took surprisingly well I must admit.)
I have since replaced it with a 2015 that I picked up with 70k for the princely sum of $2800 bucks!!! They are dirt cheap and will be the cars I pick up used for as long as I can. Dirt cheap to own, dirt cheap to maintain, dirt cheap to operate. Again, not everyone's cup of tea, but I live in the sticks, and I just don't see an EV being practical for a non city dweller.
 

j_martell

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2014
Location
Centre Wellington, Ontario
TDI
Reflex Silver 2006 Jetta GLS TDI Wagon
Probably not. I need range coupled with efficiency. I’ll likely end up in a newer (than my 06 BEW wagon) TDI hatch of some sort.

Also, I’m a gear head at heart, so my car needs to make noise lol
 

pkhoury

That guy with the goats
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Location
Medina, TX
TDI
2010 JSW DSG, 2013 JSW 02Q, 2014 NB 02Q, 2015 GSW DSG, 2004 Golf 02J, 2005 JW auto, 2003 Jetta 02J swap, 1995 Ford F-450
And the Kia Soul EV, or is that discontinued?
Kia Soul EV? The Kia Soul HAS NO SOUL. I hate to imagine an electric variant!
 

kjclow

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Apr 26, 2003
Location
Charlotte, NC
TDI
2010 JSW TDI silver and black. 2017 Ram Ecodiesel dark red with brown and beige interior.
I think I see a lot of souls becasue the are unique and stick out like a sore thumb.
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
The 2021 plug in hybrid Golf GTE looks like it may suit some here well. With roughly 40 miles of battery range and the same power and good looks of the GTI, I know I'll take one for a test drive when they show up at the local dealership. It could be both a great daily driver and road trip vehicle for folks not quite ready to spend $35k+ on a Model 3.

 

Matt-98AHU

Loose Nut Behind the Wheel Vendor
Joined
Apr 23, 2006
Location
Vallejo, CA
TDI
2014 Passat SE DSG, 2005 Passat wagon, 2004 Touareg V10.
Being that I'm a cheap-ass and refuse to pay someone else to work on my cars, coupled with the fact that Tesla is very stingy about allowing outside shops and individuals to buy parts along with being cagey in releasing service information, I think I'm going to opt out.

I'll stay with brands that are friendlier to the DIY and independent repair shops.

BEV development is also at a stage a lot like early smart phones, where the rapid development of new hardware and software will quickly outdate old models and the only proper way to address this is to upgrade to the new model, where I can find justifications with certain older internal combustion engine cars that they're cheap enough to buy and repair and are interesting enough, I can justify keeping them much longer and can modernize certain aspects of them 'just enough' to work for me.

I'm going to keep burning dinosaurs for the foreseeable future until development stabilizes more, BEVs prove themselves to be reasonable to own with age, as I also can't see myself ever buying a new vehicle of any kind when I know certain used cars are very cheap to purchase and address some of the neglected maintenance and keep them going for a long time.

But that's the mindset of a mechanic who can fix everything on their own vehicle. I refuse to allow Tesla to diminish my ability to repair my own vehicle and I infact somewhat despise them for even attempting to do so.

Which is a shame to say, because I like many of the features they've been pioneering, the performance, the range, the ever improving charge times and being made in the U.S.. All things to admire for sure. But when they go all draconian with repair information and parts access, I feel like giving them a giant middle finger.
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
If you've ever watched Rich Rebuilds attack a flood or otherwise damaged Tesla battery pack with his toolbox of kitchen cutlery, you can kind of see where they are coming from. A lot of shadetree mechanics are pretty clueless when it comes to safety when working with high voltage equipment.

The good news is that with the rapidly growing adoption of EVs, aftermarket parts manufacturers are sure to get in on the action. Hopped a curb and bent a control arm on your brand new Tesla? No problem, the aftermarket will have a more reasonably priced and easily accessible replacement.
 

Rob Mayercik

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Location
NJ, U.S.A.
TDI
2002 Jetta GLS, Baltic Green/Beige
Being that I'm a cheap-ass and refuse to pay someone else to work on my cars, coupled with the fact that Tesla is very stingy about allowing outside shops and individuals to buy parts along with being cagey in releasing service information, I think I'm going to opt out.
Wouldn't that fall under the Magnusson-Moss Act (cannot deny warranty coverage for owner-performed maintenance if they can document the maintenance was done), or am I thinking of another law?

At the very least, sounds like an entertaining "Right to Repai" lawsuit in the making if they annoy the right person...
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
Wouldn't that fall under the Magnusson-Moss Act (cannot deny warranty coverage for owner-performed maintenance if they can document the maintenance was done), or am I thinking of another law?

At the very least, sounds like an entertaining "Right to Repai" lawsuit in the making if they annoy the right person...
Tesla has not allowed any aftermarket suppliers or any repair chains to service their cars. All mechanical service is done by Tesla. All bodywork is completed by shops they've authorized, and there aren't a lot of them. Not having a dealer network must make control of the process easier.

I suspect at some point they're not going to be able to meet demand for repairs and will have to let aftermarket suppliers make parts and independent shops make repairs.
 

tikal

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2001
Location
Southeast Texas
TDI
2004 Passat Wagon (chainless + 5 MT + GDE tune)
Of course you might 'piss off' a Tesla owner by getting a Lucid Air.

Bob Wilson
You can also 'piss off' your family or your common sense budget practices for buying a vehicle that your should not due to its cost.

It really does not matter if is a $$$$ BEV or a $$$$ ICE truck/SUV/etc that you want buy really do not need. Don't take a loan and buy what you can afford. Keep/maintain your current vehicle, especially if is an efficient TDI.
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW

Pat Dolan

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2002
Location
Martensville, SK
TDI
2003 A4 Variant, 2015 Q7
I can't even begin to imagine the end of ICE engines, as they are used in so many forms of transportation - forms that will not likely ever be battery powered. I can see gasoline going by the wayside, but not diesel. If I was a commuter (and THAT is an environmental disaster by its very nature) I might consider one of these new, fancy golf carts, but I don't so I won't. Our JV partners built a bunch of charging stations for a chain of fuel stops spread over half the country. Someone thought to buy an E-Golf so staff could pull into the stations during installation and sow their face driving a plug-in. LMFAO when I found that they had to pull it on tow dolly behind an F350 diesel since there wasn't enough range in the E-G to go from place to place.

Finally: do you have ANY idea of how much resource waste and pollution are involved in making LiPo batteries? OR, what happens to them when they are physically damaged?? NO WAY my family is riding in any vehicle with that crap involved. Finally, being in the electricity business, there is no where near enough excess capacity for daytime charging on any large scale (but at the cost of spewing out emissions from a displaced thermal generating site, a fair number could be charged at night at home.
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
Not many EVs currently use a LFP battery chemistry. The base Model 3 made in China does use CATL's new LFP chemistry/architecture. Energy density is lower in LFP, but cycle life is excellent. And they don't contain Cobalt.

There are dozens and dozens of aftermarket wheels, rotors, brake pads, and suspension components for Tesla's. I think we're mostly just regurgitating falsehoods we've heard about there being a complete lack of aftermarket part availability.
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
Apparently steering parts (ball joints, tie rods) are available. One of our suppliers, Sidem in Belgium, is making them, and I'm sure there are others. No struts, shocks, or brakes in the aftermarket, yet, however, as far as we know. And I doubt the super fancy low resistence wheel bearings are available from anyone other than Tesla.
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
Last edited:

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
I wonder if those meet the same friction specs as the OE bearings. As I understand it the low resistance of the OE bearings is a significant contributor to range.
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
Not sure about the exact coefficient of friction numbers on those aftermarket bearings, but it has to be a lot better than a shot bearing assembly that needs replaced. But you're right that Tesla has made iterative improvements to things like bearings, tires, motors, and even by using Brembo monoblock brake calipers- all in pursuit of better efficiency. It turns out that improving efficiency is a much cheaper(and better) way to add range than just adding bigger batteries.
 

bwilson4web

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2009
Location
Huntsville, AL
TDI
17 Prius Prime, 14 BMW i3-REx
When I slid into a curb, I picked up the replacement bearing at the Tesla Service Center and replaced them myself. I've already installed lighter rims and Bridgestone ECOPIA tires on the rear. I'll replace the front tires when they get closer to the wear bars.

Bob Wilson
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
Tesla's "battery day" is coming up next Tuesday. Elon says it will be insane, so I think we should expect that some truly paradigm shifting advances will be announced. It's probably a good time to buy shares right now. I would be buying if my stock portfolio wasn't already tremendously overweight in tsla.

One of the changes appears to be to the size of the cylindrical cells. From 18650, to 2170, to the newest format that appears similar in size to a "D cell" battery. Hopefully the new chemistry has lots of Nickel, because I recently made a speculative investment in a Canadian Nickel mining outfit.
 

Mozambiquer

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Location
Versailles Missouri
TDI
1998 VW Jetta TDI. 1982 VW Rabbit pickup, 2001 VW Jetta TDI
You can also 'piss off' your family or your common sense budget practices for buying a vehicle that your should not due to its cost.

It really does not matter if is a $$$$ BEV or a $$$$ ICE truck/SUV/etc that you want buy really do not need. Don't take a loan and buy what you can afford. Keep/maintain your current vehicle, especially if is an efficient TDI.
Good advice!!! You follow Dave ramsey? Lol? 😂
For reals, I'm not ever planning to get a Tesla... Vw has enough electrical things... I don't need more!
 

pkhoury

That guy with the goats
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Location
Medina, TX
TDI
2010 JSW DSG, 2013 JSW 02Q, 2014 NB 02Q, 2015 GSW DSG, 2004 Golf 02J, 2005 JW auto, 2003 Jetta 02J swap, 1995 Ford F-450
Being that I'm a cheap-ass and refuse to pay someone else to work on my cars, coupled with the fact that Tesla is very stingy about allowing outside shops and individuals to buy parts along with being cagey in releasing service information, I think I'm going to opt out.

I'll stay with brands that are friendlier to the DIY and independent repair shops.

BEV development is also at a stage a lot like early smart phones, where the rapid development of new hardware and software will quickly outdate old models and the only proper way to address this is to upgrade to the new model, where I can find justifications with certain older internal combustion engine cars that they're cheap enough to buy and repair and are interesting enough, I can justify keeping them much longer and can modernize certain aspects of them 'just enough' to work for me.

I'm going to keep burning dinosaurs for the foreseeable future until development stabilizes more, BEVs prove themselves to be reasonable to own with age, as I also can't see myself ever buying a new vehicle of any kind when I know certain used cars are very cheap to purchase and address some of the neglected maintenance and keep them going for a long time.

But that's the mindset of a mechanic who can fix everything on their own vehicle. I refuse to allow Tesla to diminish my ability to repair my own vehicle and I infact somewhat despise them for even attempting to do so.

Which is a shame to say, because I like many of the features they've been pioneering, the performance, the range, the ever improving charge times and being made in the U.S.. All things to admire for sure. But when they go all draconian with repair information and parts access, I feel like giving them a giant middle finger.
Sadly, that reminds me in some ways of Apple, though they're not as draconian as Tesla is. But I'm in the same boat as you, along with the fact that I didn't find the Tesla particularly comfortable, either. But maybe the Model 3 is different from the P120d I rode in...
 

showdown 42

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Location
naples,FL
TDI
2016 TDI touareg
I might buy a E vehicle, if I needed a go around town car. I have a beast Touareg v6 diesel drive each yr fro NE to swfl 1500 miles. with lots of crap in the car. It takes 2 tanks of fuel to make the trip. Think about it My first stop for fuel is in South Carolina. Where you be in a Tesla on the same trip in Washington DC for an hour to fill up.Then in south Carolina to fill up for ar least an hour. Nooo thanks ,I'll just power my way on down the line. The EVsare fine for around town grocery trips but for towing 7000 lb trailers and going on real trips Not Yet if ever. BTW if you are using the car for around town driving who cares what the mileage is, I have a great VW Beatle convert that gets 30MPGs and is a fun around town car. I guess I don't care about EVs
 
Top