What temp is typical summer D2 good to?

velociT

Top Post Dawg
Joined
May 10, 2006
Location
Not Austin, TX
TDI
06 Jetta TDI *sold*
Ok, I know that fuel differs alot... so I'm saying your average summer ULSD D2 fuel is good to around what temperature if left untreated by an anti-gel additive?
 

OilGuy

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2006
Location
Northern Virginia
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI Wagon
+20 F is the cloud point number I always keep in my head. Might be a couple degrees warmer or so depending the the fuel.
 

tdidieselbobny

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Apr 4, 2005
Location
Stafford,NY (WNY)
TDI
'03 Galactic Blue Jetta TDI, '15 Silk Blue Golf Sportwagen TDI
Good thing for me to remember-I forgot about the fuel in my mower and the clear inline filter looks like gel-the tank is liquid still-guess it's time to break a heater out and do a thaw and treat fuel......
 

TornadoRed

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Joined
Aug 3, 2003
Location
Saint Paul (ex-San Diego)
TDI
2003 Golf GL 5-spd, red; 2003 Golf GLS 5-spd, indigo blue; 2003 Jetta TDI wagon, Candy White; 2003 Jetta TDI wagon, silver
velociT said:
Ok, I know that fuel differs alot... so I'm saying your average summer ULSD D2 fuel is good to around what temperature if left untreated by an anti-gel additive?
Cloud point is around 40°F, pour point around 15-20°F.

To quote from Lug Nut:
"There are generally three temperatures to be considered when discussing winter use of diesel fuel. These are, in descending order: the cloud point, the cold filter plug point and the gel point.

The cloud point is the temperature at which the fuel begins to change state. The change increases the opacity as longer chain molecules in the fuel begin to stiffen and knit or intertwine.

The CFPP is dependent on the size of the filtration media. Coarser media (or a new filter) will obviously have a lower CFPP than a sub-micron filter (or a used filter). There is some test standard that I do not know specifying the size of the media and the flow rate of the fuel used to calculate the CFPP.

The gel point is the temperature at which the fuel is for all intents and purposes a solid."
 
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