What did you do to your MKIV today?

Mozambiquer

Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Location
Versailles Missouri
TDI
2004 VW Touareg V10 TDI, 2012 Audi Q7 V6 TDI, 1998 VW Jetta TDI. 1982 VW Rabbit pickup, 2001 VW Jetta TDI, 2005 VW Passat wagon TDI X3, 2001 VW golf TDI, 1980 VW rabbit pickup,
Well, after I get the lines off, yes. But there's always crud under the nuts...
Loosen the lines, pull the nuts up and you can clean any crud off. The seal is down on the line itself.
 

J_dude

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Location
SK Canada
TDI
2003 1.9l “Jedi”
Loosen the lines, pull the nuts up and you can clean any crud off. The seal is down on the line itself.
Yeah that's the only way I could figure to do it. Luckily my car isn't quite as filthy as the one this pump came out of, pretty sure those injectors have dirt in em now. 😄
 

Nuje

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Location
Island near Vancouver
TDI
2015 Sportwagen; Golf GLS 2002 (swap from 2L gas); 2016 A3 e-tron
As far as the clutch goes, what do you guys put on the pivot ball and the release bearing slider assembly?
I just use the little grease pack that comes with the new clutch - it's not very much, so it keeps you from overdoing it. If I lose the pack, the manual says to use some Moly grease, so I just grab whatever brand I have kicking around that says "moly" on it.
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4's and the Cummins
For the trans input shaft, more moly content is decidedly better. Honda sells some with 60% moly content, and 70% is available if you look hard. IIRC BMW also offers such a thing for driveshaft slide joints. It is a defense against fretting. Given the shape I have seen on the working face of the throw out bearing, I also put a wee bit on the fingers and the bearing. And the pivot ball.

Douglas
 

hey_allen

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Location
Altus, OK
TDI
2000 Jetta TDI
I bought a tube of Sachs 4200 080 050 clutch grease for my various manual trans cars. It seems to be heavier than many bearing greases, thick and tacky.

It's definitely a less is more when applying to the input shaft splines though. Too much and it'll sling out onto the friction surfaces.
 

norbert77

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2022
Location
Petrolia
TDI
01 beetle
I just use the little grease pack that comes with the new clutch - it's not very much, so it keeps you from overdoing it. If I lose the pack, the manual says to use some Moly grease, so I just grab whatever brand I have kicking around that says "moly" on it.
Thank you sir
 

norbert77

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2022
Location
Petrolia
TDI
01 beetle
For the trans input shaft, more moly content is decidedly better. Honda sells some with 60% moly content, and 70% is available if you look hard. IIRC BMW also offers such a thing for driveshaft slide joints. It is a defense against fretting. Given the shape I have seen on the working face of the throw out bearing, I also put a wee bit on the fingers and the bearing. And the pivot ball.

Douglas
I had the Honda 60 paste, good stuff. I currently have some by loctite that goes on like antiseize almost, and the MSDS says 60-80% moly. No long-term use to report I just got it this past fall
 

dieseldonato

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2023
Location
Us
TDI
2001 jetta
I had the Honda 60 paste, good stuff. I currently have some by loctite that goes on like antiseize almost, and the MSDS says 60-80% moly. No long-term use to report I just got it this past fall
I have a little bottle of the loctite brand molly too. Works fairly decent, mine is pretty thick compared to the arp molly lube I have as well.
 

Powder Hound

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Oct 25, 1999
Location
Under a Bridge, Crestview, FL, USA
TDI
'00 Golf 4dr White 5sp, '02 Jettachero 5sp, Wife's '03 NB Platinum Gray auto(!)
Got the left door card back on the Golf. Took it off because applying window tint was easier with the window completely out of the car. I also got real tired of the dirt and grit being blown onto the glass because it was windy outside, and the garage is already busy with Jettachero's paint prep. And microscopic grit on the glass will ruin the tint job and drive you to drink.

Anyway, the door cards have the sagging/releasing fabric on the insert part that holds the door handle and window switches. So I decided to fix that while the door card is out. The 3 screws at the bottom of the door weren't doing anything either since the door card crappy plastic broke out and I decided I was lucky the screws stayed in the door even if the plastic didn't hold and broke. Also, the ridge that sticks out at the top and inserts into the molding on the inside of the window is half broken, but I don't know how to fix that.

I finally fixed what I could on the card, and the left one is back in. The passenger side needs repairs to the door handle before replacement. The driver's side did as well, but that was relatively easy. Easier than the passenger side anyway.

I have a few points to relate if you've never done anything like this and want to give it a try to do it yourself. Some of these points apply to fixing your own headliner as well in that the headliner is the same fabric with old urethane foam that crumbles into crumbs and brown goo on the inside, the foam fails, and then the headliner droops and looks awful. For me, when the drooping headliner hits my head I have a bad reaction and end up with a cranked neck because I don't want to go someplace and arrive with a bad case of hat-hair. So you can figure the Golf's headliner will be fixed before the end of April.

And sorry there's no photos. I suppose I could have, but I was focused on getting this job out of the way so I could resume the finish work on Jettachero. I need that done by the end of April as well. My own goal, but I'm not interested in driving a cosmetically challenged trucklet anymore.

1. Removing the insert may not be the best way to go. The reason for this is that the plastic tabs in the rest of the door that hold that insert on are longer than needed, and the insert is held in by melting the excess tab to sort of weld it all together. The covering with the urethane foam-turned-brown-goo is welded into the middle of it all, so you are guaranteed a mess. You can remove it by breaking the tabs but then you are not guaranteed a good way to reattach the insert. If you can carefully cut the rounded melted part of the top of the tab down to not go below that inside surface of the insert, and slice along the sides of the tab, you should have enough material to apply hot melt glue (or plastic bond epoxy or or other suitable adhesive) and get the insert back in the door card.

In case you think you should just glue the insert directly to the rest of the door card (and there's a rim that would make you think you can do that), then there are a couple of problems regarding spacing. That is, the insert sits on top of a 'base' made at the bottom of each tab. If you cut the tabs off completely, the spacing needed for the door handle will be lost and I wouldn't take bets on your door card going back onto the door correctly. So maybe you could make some little pads to use to glue the insert onto the rest of the door card.

If you don't remove the insert, then you can just very carefully cut the old foam off around the perimeter of the insert and go from there. You will just have the problem of how to deal with the mess you will make when chemicals needed to remove the gooey residue from the insert also dribble all over the rest of the door card. Maybe that won't cause trouble - hard to say.

2. I know of 2 things that work well to remove that residue. Acetone and Awesome ( a yellow cleaner found at Dollar General also good for removing window tint film- it dissolves the glue). Both messy but acetone evaporates very quickly. But acetone is kinda expensive because it evaporates quickly. And you'd better be using it outdoors or the fumes will create an explosive atmosphere while it asphyxiates you. And you will need lots of paper towels to wipe off the brown stuff as the acetone dissolves it. Same thing with the Awesome needing lots of paper towels. That cleaner is slower than acetone but it isn't going to make an explosive atmosphere and it doesn't evaporate so fast. It is still a mess and you have to use a lot - enough to really wet the insert.

The one upside to this is the insert doesn't dissolve in either acetone nor Awesome. It does, however, start to dissolve in xylene. Xylene doesn't evaporate nearly as quickly as acetone and will last longer, but it will start to dissolve the backing material. Ergo, if you use it, work as fast as you can and don't leave it on there.

3. Other cleaners may work. Hey, maybe some other solvent is a superb chemical to use for this, but I haven't tested any of those others. Except xylene. See above.

4. When buying your replacement material, buy a knit as opposed to woven cloth. It is the only one that can stretch a little to get around the curves in the surface you are going to cover. Knits will stretch more in one direction versus the other; figure out which and keep that in mind when you are buying material and trying to figure out how to cut it for placing onto the surface. Also, the knits I found at the fabric store have a lock stitch so they don't run. That means you don't need to melt the entire perimeter of an installed piece of material, but gluing it in place would accomplish the same thing anyway. I guess the only real advantage is that you won't get runs in the material when you stretch it while installing it.

5. 3M spray adhesive 90 works well, but is not easy to use. It can also soak through thin cloth and discolor the appearance of white or other very light colors. If you know of another good adhesive that doesn't cost the earth (3M is very proud of this stuff. Just check the price. ) then please let me know. I know I have more of this (headliner and door card cloth inserts) to repair.

6. I decided to try a different foam that wouldn't start crumbling to dust/goo in a few years, so I used some polyethylene sheets used for packing. This worked well except that for a very light color (I have white areas in the pattern I chose) shows the uneven surface of extruded polyethylene foam. A predominately dark pattern probably won't show that. A smooth surface foam would probably be even better since it wouldn't restrict the pattern, but I'm not wasting any more time on this. It was hard enough to find the polyethylene that I did find.

And that's about it. Hopefully I didn't waste your time writing stuff you already know. If this helped you, then you're welcome.

Cheers,

PH
 
Last edited:

dieseldonato

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2023
Location
Us
TDI
2001 jetta
Got the left door card back on the Golf. Took it off because applying window tint was easier with the window completely out of the car. I also got real tired of the dirt and grit being blown onto the glass because it was windy outside, and the garage is already busy with Jettachero's paint prep. And microscopic grit on the glass will ruin the tint job and drive you to drink.

Anyway, the door cards have the sagging/releasing fabric on the insert part that holds the door handle and window switches. So I decided to fix that while the door card is out. The 3 screws at the bottom of the door weren't doing anything either since the door card crappy plastic broke out and I decided I was lucky the screws stayed in the door even if the plastic didn't hold and broke. Also, the ridge that sticks out at the top and inserts into the molding on the inside of the window is half broken, but I don't know how to fix that.

I finally fixed what I could on the card, and the left one is back in. The passenger side needs repairs to the door handle before replacement. The driver's side did as well, but that was relatively easy. Easier than the passenger side anyway.

I have a few points to relate if you've never done anything like this and want to give it a try to do it yourself. Some of these points apply to fixing your own headliner as well in that the headliner is the same fabric with old urethane foam that crumbles into crumbs and brown goo on the inside, the foam fails, and then the headliner droops and looks awful. For me, when the drooping headliner hits my head I have a bad reaction and end up with a cranked neck because I don't want to go someplace and arrive with a bad case of hat-hair. So you can figure the Gold's headliner will be fixed before the end of April.

And sorry there's no photos. I suppose I could have, but I was focused on getting this job out of the way so I could resume the finish work on Jettachero. I need that done by the end of April as well. My own goal, but I'm not interested in driving a cosmetically challenged trucklet anymore.

1. Removing the insert may not be the best way to go. The reason for this is that the plastic tabs in the rest of the door that hold that insert on are longer than needed, and the insert is held in by melting the excess tab to sort of weld it all together. The covering with the urethane foam-turned-brown-goo is welded into the middle of it all, so you are guaranteed a mess. You can remove it by breaking the tabs but then you are not guaranteed a good way to reattach the insert. If you can carefully cut the rounded melted part of the top of the tab down to not go below that inside surface of the insert, and slice along the sides of the tab, you should have enough material to apply hot melt glue (or plastic bond epoxy or or other suitable adhesive) and get the insert back in the door card.

In case you think you should just glue the insert directly to the rest of the door card (and there's a rim that would make you think you can do that), then there are a couple of problems regarding spacing. That is, the insert sits on top of a 'base' made at the bottom of each tab. If you cut the tabs off completely, the spacing needed for the door handle will be lost and I wouldn't take bets on your door card going back onto the door correctly. So maybe you could make some little pads to use to glue the insert onto the rest of the door card.

If you don't remove the insert, then you can just very carefully cut the old foam off around the perimeter of the insert and go from there. You will just have the problem of how to deal with the mess you will make when chemicals needed to remove the gooey residue from the insert also dribble all over the rest of the door card. Maybe that won't cause trouble - hard to say.

2. I know of 2 things that work well to remove that residue. Acetone and Awesome ( a yellow cleaner found at Dollar General also good for removing window tint film- it dissolves the glue). Both messy but acetone evaporates very quickly. But acetone is kinda expensive because it evaporates quickly. And you'd better be using it outdoors or the fumes will create an explosive atmosphere while it asphyxiates you. And you will need lots of paper towels to wipe off the brown stuff as the acetone dissolves it. Same thing with the Awesome needing lots of paper towels. That cleaner is slower than acetone but it isn't going to make an explosive atmosphere and it doesn't evaporate so fast. It is still a mess and you have to use a lot - enough to really wet the insert.

The one upside to this is the insert doesn't dissolve in either acetone nor Awesome.

3. Other cleaners may work. Hey, maybe xylene or some other solvent is a superb chemical to use for this, but I haven't tested any of those others.

4. When buying your replacement material, buy a knit as opposed to woven cloth. It is the only one that can stretch a little to get around the curves in the surface you are going to cover. Knits will stretch more in one direction versus the other; figure out which and keep that in mind when you are buying material and trying to figure out how to cut it for placing onto the surface. Also, the knits I found at the fabric store have a lock stitch so they don't run. That means you don't need to melt the entire perimeter of an installed piece of material, but gluing it in place would accomplish the same thing anyway. I guess the only real advantage is that you won't get runs in the material when you stretch it while installing it.

5. 3M spray adhesive 90 works well, but is not easy to use. It can also soak through thin cloth and discolor the appearance of white or other very light colors. If you know of another good adhesive that doesn't cost the earth (3M is very proud of this stuff. Just check the price. ) then please let me know. I know I have more of this (headliner and door card cloth inserts) to repair.

6. I decided to try a different foam that wouldn't start crumbling to dust/goo in a few years, so I used some polyethylene sheets used for packing. This worked well except that for a very light color (I have white areas in the pattern I chose) shows the uneven surface of extruded polyethylene foam. A predominately dark pattern probably won't show that. A smooth surface foam would probably be even better since it wouldn't restrict the pattern, but I'm not wasting any more time on this. It was hard enough to find the polyethylene that I did find.

And that's about it. Hopefully I didn't waste your time writing stuff you already know. If this helped you, then you're welcome.

Cheers,

PH
Bit of a book, but I found it very informative. Someone already attempted headliner sag repair with a staple gun on my jetta, so eventually I'd like to reline it. Thanks for the tips and insights!
 

wonneber

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Oct 12, 2011
Location
Monroe, NY, USA
TDI
2014 Jetta Sportwagon,2003 Jetta 261K Sold but not forgotten
Rear brakes were dragging on my 00 NB daily driver and wouldn’t release , pulled parking brake lever off and with a scribe pulled the seal away from PB shaft and hit it with some LPS2. Worked lever and now both levers work as the should , reinstalled helper springs too.
I installed the heavier ones from ID Parts on my 03 JSW.
Easiest and quickest upgrade I ever did.
Well worth it.
Sprayed some WD on the arms also.
 

79TA7.6

Veteran Member
Joined
May 8, 2006
Location
Live: Wilbur/Creston; Work: Moses Lake Washington
TDI
2003 TDI Jetta, 2002 TDI Golf, 2005 TDI Golf
The 05 Golf got a diesel purge, fuel filter change, and oil change. Not sure who the smarty was that was changing the oil before, but they never removed the old small o-ring, just placed a new one in the spot above where it is supposed to go. Not sure how they figured to do that. Old one crumbled as I removed it.
 

03TDICommuter

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Location
So. Cal
TDI
01' NB, 5spd
Tested my fan operation by jumpering the 3 wire connector. Low and high speed works fine so I'll be buying a new fan temp sense switch.

Also sealed up the rocker sill drain hole at the front. I cleaned them out a few weeks ago when I replaced the radiator and then realized that white stuff I dug out was caulk and they were sealed from the factory - oops.
 

norbert77

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2022
Location
Petrolia
TDI
01 beetle
Got most of the transmission seals replaced. The shifter shaft I took out but don't have one to put in, I accidentally ordered 2 input shaft seals... Then bought the clutch slider sleeve so none of those do a thing. But good news, I have a shiny differential flange now

 

joe00golf

Active member
Joined
Feb 5, 2024
Location
Connecticut
TDI
2000 Golf
Went to do rotors and pads all around. Found out I needed a piston winding tool for the rear and didn't have a 7mm hex socket for the front so all I got to was the passenger rear before running out of time. Will wrap up the rest tomorrow.

Did a pretty intense search around the engine last week and all signs point to the rear main seal leaking even though I had a shop replace it when the clutch was done a little over a year ago. They did some shotty work on the car so after seeing the care that's needed for installing the RMS, I imagine they did mess it up. I did some research on pulling the transmission and doesn't look like the worst job. I need to swing by FCP Euro this week and grab the RMS and clutch alignment tool. Hopefully nothing else needs replacing as this was just all apart pretty recently.
 

joe00golf

Active member
Joined
Feb 5, 2024
Location
Connecticut
TDI
2000 Golf
Damn, that would have been a smart work around. Kind of glad I bought the tool from autozone though as it was pretty tough to get it to start turning.
 

Zak99b5

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Location
Albany NY
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
On #2 son's 01 TDI sedan, helped him fix his leaking sunroof drains. First we cut the nipples and tried to snake out the drains, but on both sides the wire nor the water would come out in the door jamb. But we could hear, and my son felt, the wire poking against the back side of the nipples.

This told me that the hoses had come disconnected from the nipples. Used a trick from YouTube--remove nipple, feed wire down and out the hose & door jamb, slide nipple over the end of the wire, then push the nipple up & in. Worked like a charm.

Then we got his aftermarket (installed by PO) radio all the way back in. It had been hanging out a bit ever since we fixed his blend doors. It was just all the wires behind it preventing it from going in, and this time I popped out the little cubby (single DIN) above, which let me place them out of the way.

Finally, for my car, I made arrangements to purchase on Marketplace something I've been wanting ever since I bought this car. Going after work today to complete the deal. I won't mention specifics so as not to jinx things..... With any luck, pics to follow.
 

burpod

teh stallionz!!1
Joined
Nov 27, 2004
Location
cape cod, ma
TDI
82 rabbit vnt ahu, 98 jetta vnt ahu, 05 parts car, 88 scirocco.. :/
Damn, that would have been a smart work around. Kind of glad I bought the tool from autozone though as it was pretty tough to get it to start turning.
a C-clamp actually works perfectly. if the caliper is in good shape, and you put the swiveling end of the C-clamp on the piston, it will naturally turn itself clockwise as it pushes it in. the C-clamp i have, actually fits *Exactly* in the circular depression in the piston. no need for a specialized piston rewind tool at all. if the caliper piston is gummy, it will not want to turn so easily in which case you need to carefully grab hold of it with some large pliers to help turn it.
 

norbert77

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2022
Location
Petrolia
TDI
01 beetle
Oh yuck, lost low beams. Looks like I'm into the steering column switch. There was a write-up on myturbodiesel about the coolant migrating into the wiring but link is no good, what's involved?
 

hey_allen

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Location
Altus, OK
TDI
2000 Jetta TDI
I had that column switch connector wiggle it's way partially apart, and fixed it by pushing it back together. I ended up adding a zip tie to secure it after finding that issue.
 

braddies

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2021
Location
America
TDI
03 golf ALH
Changed out alternator pulley, idler pulley and serpentine tensioner, the old tensioner pulley was a little crunchy but alas, there's still belt squeek
 
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