What did you do to your MKIV today?

Zak99b5

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Location
Albany NY
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
So, no real timing marks, just three dots? Going for the middle.
I wouldn't use those dots on the crank sprocket to find TDC of the crank. Assuming your new FW has the TDC mark, I'd do clutch & rms first, then reinstall the tranny. That way you have a much better way to be sure you're at TDC on the crank. And if it moves a little, you'll see it clearly at the fw but not so much at the sprocket, since the fw is so much bigger.

I put paint marks on and near (both fore and aft) of the TDC mark on my new fw when I did my clutch. Makes it much easier to see in the future.
 

norbert77

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2022
Location
Petrolia
TDI
01 beetle
I wouldn't use those dots on the crank sprocket to find TDC of the crank. Assuming your new FW has the TDC mark, I'd do clutch & rms first, then reinstall the tranny. That way you have a much better way to be sure you're at TDC on the crank. And if it moves a little, you'll see it clearly at the fw but not so much at the sprocket, since the fw is so much bigger.

I put paint marks on and near (both fore and aft) of the TDC mark on my new fw when I did my clutch. Makes it much easier to see in the future.
Thank you for the advice, wasn't seeing the timing mark till I scraped a bunch of rust away
 

ts888

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2023
Location
PNW US
TDI
03 ALH
Finally retired my battery, a VW branded one dated 2012. In the last couple weeks it has been unenthusiastic about starting the car on cold mornings, I have had to jump it a couple of times. Confirmed the alternator was still humping, so I tested the battery and the verdict from the Snappy R2D2 was "replace battery."

Our shop is an Interstate dealer, so that's what went in. Will it last 12 years? Stay tuned...
 

pkhoury

That guy with the goats
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Location
Medina, TX
TDI
2013 JSW, 2003 Jetta Ute, 2 x 2002 Golf, 2000 Golf
Changed my oil in DSOL two days ago. Also was able to take a sledgehammer to my skidplate. In December sometime, I ran over what the local sheriff said was a ratchet from a semi trailer - it sent both myself and the guy behind me airborne about 6 inches, and was a pretty hard hit, because I still have an impression on the skidplate of the dogbone mount on it. So now, the car no longer rattles bad around 1800RPM. The valve cover was leaking oil (no shock there), so I pulled that off, took off the old red permatex I used, cleaned everything up, and put permatex black, then let the car sit about 24 hours before moving it. I guess we shall see whether it helps stop the seeping, particularly around cylinder 4. I'm trying to make it a point to rotate actively between both DSEL and DSOL again, since the JSW has been at the body shop almost a year (I told him no rush, so he took it pretty literally).
 

The Cream Dolphin

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Location
Fernie, B.C. originally Dwight, ON
TDI
02 VW Golf TDI ALH 245k
I know I am beating two dead horses in one post but... Someone posted recently - and I think it may have been @P2B - about soaking the valve cover in something over night to soften it up to help stop the leak, but I cannot find it with the search, or using search parameters on google. If I were to add that I was not sure how to add photos I would have the valve cover/search/photo trifecta but at least I know how to do that. Hope someone can help out, thanks.
 

Zak99b5

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Location
Albany NY
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
I know I am beating two dead horses in one post but... Someone posted recently - and I think it may have been @P2B - about soaking the valve cover in something over night to soften it up to help stop the leak, but I cannot find it with the search, or using search parameters on google. If I were to add that I was not sure how to add photos I would have the valve cover/search/photo trifecta but at least I know how to do that. Hope someone can help out, thanks.
Link
 

joe00golf

Active member
Joined
Feb 5, 2024
Location
Connecticut
TDI
2000 Golf
Resurfaced my headlights with the 3m kit. Been about two years since I did it last. Tried some clear coat this time to see how that effects it. I've atleast done it enough now I can get two headlights done in under 30 minutes which isnt bad.
 

Nuje

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Location
Island near Vancouver
TDI
2002 Golf 6MT; 2015 Sportwagen 6MT; 2016 A3 e-tron 6DSG
Given we don't have a "what did you do today" for the solitary year that the BRM was sold here....
I replaced the engine wiring harness in a Mk5 BRM because the fans were running full tilt all the time, with fault codes pointing to coolant temp sensor (already changed...twice). So, out came the ECM and all of the engine wiring. And let me tell ya...not something you wanna do every day. What a mess of a maze of hoses and pipes that you need to work around.

To those who have done this before: There's a grey three-wire connector behind the oil filter housing - I'm thinking this is the crankshaft position sensor connector(?); is there a way to get this out?
I couldn't figure out how to get a grip (even with the proper tool) on the release tab - it's pressed pretty much right up against the block. I ended up just cutting that portion of the new harness (3-wire connector as well as the oil temp sensor (single wire at base of the oil filter housing), and heat-shrink-butt-connector-ing them to the pre-existing wires.

And in the end, all good - no more random/bizarre error codes, and fans behaving properly.

Also pulled down the headliner to get at the sunroof drain tubes to clean them out - my usual bicycle brake cable wasn't working, so pulled them down and used some air. All good now.

And messed around with the taillight bulbs - to maybe/hopefully/doubtfully stop the "bulb-out" error light from coming on intermittently.
 

J_dude

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Location
SK Canada
TDI
2003 1.9l “Jedi”
A friend's dad recently "totalled" an 03 ALH, he tried to miss a Bambi and instead hit the rhubarb. Not a lot of damage but passenger curtain airbags deployed so it was written off. He bought it back but doesn't really want another undrivable car on his yard, so it may be mine for $600. 450k kms, manual trans and it's in kinda rough shape but starts and runs pretty good so, while not a steal of a deal, I think it's decent. I think it even could be driven but it has a bent tie rod. But I'd still love to have it even if only for a spare engine and trans, so I'm not complaining.
 

Zak99b5

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Location
Albany NY
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
THANK YOU

Stdoubt, not p2b, my bad.

If you do it, especially if you try it with j_dudes suggestion of Lucas stop leak, let us know in that thread how it goes!
Right now I'm busy with doing brakes for buddies and sons, as well as cleaning and sanding wheels to prep for paint, oh and work and family. So the valve cover isn't that high a priority. Maybe I'll get to it over the break next week.
 

SilverGhost

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2005
Location
Back in So Flo - St Lucie
TDI
'05 Golf - totaled :(, wife's '13 Beetle - buy back, TDIless
Changed my oil in DSOL two days ago. Also was able to take a sledgehammer to my skidplate. In December sometime, I ran over what the local sheriff said was a ratchet from a semi trailer - it sent both myself and the guy behind me airborne about 6 inches, and was a pretty hard hit, because I still have an impression on the skidplate of the dogbone mount on it. So now, the car no longer rattles bad around 1800RPM. The valve cover was leaking oil (no shock there), so I pulled that off, took off the old red permatex I used, cleaned everything up, and put permatex black, then let the car sit about 24 hours before moving it. I guess we shall see whether it helps stop the seeping, particularly around cylinder 4. I'm trying to make it a point to rotate actively between both DSEL and DSOL again, since the JSW has been at the body shop almost a year (I told him no rush, so he took it pretty literally).
If you can find the VW silicon VW makes that is white, use it. I call that s**t magic for all the times it sealed up stuff that was pissing oil. Quite literally had oil actively running across the sealing surface and that stuff still sealed it up. Also sets up kinda rubbery, not spongy silicon like most silicon I have used.

That said I don't know about ALH valve cover gaskets.
 

dieseldonato

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2023
Location
Us
TDI
2001 jetta
If you can find the VW silicon VW makes that is white, use it. I call that s**t magic for all the times it sealed up stuff that was pissing oil. Quite literally had oil actively running across the sealing surface and that stuff still sealed it up. Also sets up kinda rubbery, not spongy silicon like most silicon I have used.

That said I don't know about ALH valve cover gaskets.
Scania uses the same stuff, works great. Wish I knew who made it for them, it's stupid expensive. I suspected three bond, or elring but don't have any proof. Would be nice to know though.
 

Nuje

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Location
Island near Vancouver
TDI
2002 Golf 6MT; 2015 Sportwagen 6MT; 2016 A3 e-tron 6DSG
That's the stuff that I got in the past for doing oil pan replacement. Liked it a lot better than what VW's OE product is now (black stuff).
 

J_dude

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Location
SK Canada
TDI
2003 1.9l “Jedi”
Went through the "big" city today so I stopped at Buck's Auto and snagged some spare 109 and 53 relays and a relay socket, an armrest lid with unbroken hinges, and a set of Passat telescoping sun visors (score!). For $20, not bad at all. Almost took a set of Golf vents too but decided against it for now.
 

Zak99b5

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Location
Albany NY
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
Helped #2 son with his brakes last night (01 sedan) at 4:00 pm yesterday. His rear calipers were iffy at best, so he bought a new set. Replacement was going fairly normal, dealing with 23+ years of upstate NY rust. But on the second side (driver's), the brake line snapped right near the banjo fitting.

Luckily, FLAPS had a replacement in stock a few minutes' drive away. No 11mm flare nut wrench, though. Had to go all the way across Albany to pick one up at O'Reillys. Starting to get dark.

Original line fitting actutally started unscrewing pretty easily, but the line did end up twisting and snapping (not a problem or a surprise). And of course all the white plastic clips along the axle shattered, so we used a zip tie for now.

We start bleeding the brakes (2-man method), and I notice the passenger side is leaking at the banjo fitting. Snugged it down a little more, but nope, still leaking. Removed it, and there was a gouge on the underside. Must've happened when I had to pry the old lower crush washer off the old banjo bolt to replace it. Spent 20-30 minutes filing it down and testing to see if it would hold, and finally it did.

Topped off reservoir and finished bleeding. Brakes barely working at all. Rebled both sides. Pedal was (reportedly) feeling good this time, but after starting the motor up, brakes are still soft. At this point it's 9:00, so we just park it. Going to try bleeding it again this afternoon. I'll pull out the laptop and do the Vag Com bleed, in case air made its way up into the ABS pump while we were running around getting parts and tools.
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4's and the Cummins
For the leaking banjo, tighten it. hit the bolt with a hammer, tighten again. repeat. Same sort of thing to do so as to make sure the injector washers seal up only the injectors get a slightly more gentle approach... :)

If I have to open the system, block the pedal down, then open. Keep the pedal down...it does not leak out when rigged thusly...

Douglas
 

KrashDH

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Location
Washington
TDI
2002 Golf
Spent 20-30 minutes filing it down and testing to see if it would hold, and finally it did.
I re-use almost every crush washer I've come across with this method. Just take some sandpaper to get the heavy marks down, then finish with some emery cloth or fine grit. I'll change them out once they look structurally too thin or susceptible to cracking
 

jmodge

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jun 18, 2015
Location
Greenville, MI
TDI
2001 alh Jetta, RC2 w/.205's 5speed daily summer commuter and 2000 alh Jetta 5spd swap, 2" lift, hitch, stage 3 TDtuning w/.216's winter cruiser, 1996 Tacoma ALh
Those are captured washers on those lines IIRC
 

jmodge

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jun 18, 2015
Location
Greenville, MI
TDI
2001 alh Jetta, RC2 w/.205's 5speed daily summer commuter and 2000 alh Jetta 5spd swap, 2" lift, hitch, stage 3 TDtuning w/.216's winter cruiser, 1996 Tacoma ALh
they are. i would like to see about cutting them out in favor of a size that is replaceable next time i need to do one
It seems they sold the washers at NAPA along with the compatible lines. Don’t take that as gospel though, it’s been a number of years
 

jmodge

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jun 18, 2015
Location
Greenville, MI
TDI
2001 alh Jetta, RC2 w/.205's 5speed daily summer commuter and 2000 alh Jetta 5spd swap, 2" lift, hitch, stage 3 TDtuning w/.216's winter cruiser, 1996 Tacoma ALh
Yeah, I've removed those and just used standard crush washers. Just make sure they're approx same size. Doesn't matter if the ID is a bit bigger
I know I did it somewhere along the line on one of the cars. I think I might have screwed up a washer before realizing it was captured. At that point there was no choice but to make something work.
 

Zak99b5

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Location
Albany NY
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
If they are supposed to be captured washers, and crush washers, that doesn't make a lot of sense. You certainly can reuse a crush washer, but not multiple times, and you should clean it up as Krash mentioned. I've even done the old heat with a MAPP gas torch trick with used ones.

But another reason they are stupid, is that the upper caliper pin bolt is in the way if you try to screw in the banjo bolt with the fitting at the head already. Ask me how I know. With regular washers, you just drop the bottom one on the caliper, set the banjo fitting down, then install the bolt with the other washer on it. I fought with the captured banjo bolt for ten minutes before I decided to pry off the washer to remove it from the fitting, and it was in in seconds.

Welp, we got back to the car yesterday afternoon. The banjo fitting that I had to file down had wept some brake fluid, so it wasn't as sealed as I'd thought. Took a finer file and had at it for a good while, and finally there was no nick or scratch that made it to the circumference of the hole. Noticed also that the two crush washers I had used before (new ones) both had an identical set of radial scratches in them. Found an old one that was all smooth and used that instead. Bled that caliper and got some air out of it, and the pedal was nice and hard.

Started it up, and with the booster working, the brakes felt tons better. Put the wheels back on, and my son took it for a test drive. All seems good now. I don't feel fully confident in that fitting I had to file down, but then again on Tuesday, the soft pedal was immediate. I'm thinking it's either leaking and not holding pressure, or it's a tight connection. He wants to drive it to Boston (3 hours away) Friday with his buddy, so I told him just drive it around town a bit last night and today, and if the pedal feels the same, he's good. If we do end up needing to replace that line, it's not the end of the world.
 
Top