What did you do to your MKIV today?

KrashDH

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Location
Washington
TDI
2002 Golf
" The MAF is upstream of the CCV "

Oops, right you are. I did thank of that after posting, lol, shoulda' edited that bit out. Still, that engine block
vapor is going somewhere, or not. I'm catching something I don't want from, at the very least, the inside of
the pipes.

Krash,
And I take your point about IC oil coming from the turbo, nevertheless, less oil, vapor or otherwise, is better.
Mebbe a can on the turbo outlet to the SMIC is called for. I'll have to check my IC to see if there's anything
in there. Lol, I figgered I might be poking the hornets nest of peoples opines on the subject,,,,,,,,
Having ran both, with data (oil qty) from both setups, I made my decision based on the fact it really wasn't doing anything except taking up space.

Didn't hurt my feelings one way or the other. I advocated for it when I put it in, for the theoretical benefits, but find that in my case, theory wasn't reality
 

burpod

teh stallionz!!1
Joined
Nov 27, 2004
Location
cape cod, ma
TDI
82 rabbit vnt ahu, 98 jetta vnt ahu, 05 parts car, 88 scirocco.. :/
Having ran both, with data (oil qty) from both setups, I made my decision based on the fact it really wasn't doing anything except taking up space.

Didn't hurt my feelings one way or the other. I advocated for it when I put it in, for the theoretical benefits, but find that in my case, theory wasn't reality
this was also what i found :) got rid of it a long time ago. what i do now to take up space is run a switched ccv vent using adjustable boost pressure switch + egr solenoid (mounted inside the dash) + 3way cheap "heater bypass valve" so if boost is say <8psi ccv goes to intake, else it goes to a dump. reduces stink at idle and parking lots and i don't worry about having it hooked to intake if i'm doing 30psi *shrug* zero scientific data on this, of course, but one can smell it if it's dumping
 

J_dude

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Location
SK Canada
TDI
2003 1.9l “Jedi”
this was also what i found :) got rid of it a long time ago. what i do now to take up space is run a switched ccv vent using adjustable boost pressure switch + egr solenoid (mounted inside the dash) + 3way cheap "heater bypass valve" so if boost is say <8psi ccv goes to intake, else it goes to a dump. reduces stink at idle and parking lots and i don't worry about having it hooked to intake if i'm doing 30psi *shrug* zero scientific data on this, of course, but one can smell it if it's dumping
That is a really neat idea but maybe too complicated for me 😂
 

braddies

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2021
Location
America
TDI
03 golf ALH
Always thought that the additional oil from the CCV would add a little lubrication for the intake valves..
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4's and the Cummins
Always thought that the additional oil from the CCV would add a little lubrication for the intake valves..
Examine its path...

Down the TIP to the compressor inlet, downhill further to the intercooler. Then the path is mostly uphill until it gets to the intake manifold. *ANY liquid getting to the compressor wheel is to be avoided; the wheel itself is moving so fast erosion slowly happens. Under sub freezing temperature, any moisture( combustion gas forced past the rings) will condense and freeze in the IC.

Douglas
 

dieseldonato

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2023
Location
Us
TDI
2001 jetta
And just think, "catch can, and crank case emissions" wasn't even a thing with diesels till emission laws mandated it.
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
And just think, "catch can, and crank case emissions" wasn't even a thing with diesels till emission laws mandated it.
Which was a very, very long time ago. Diesels that didn't have this were far more primitive than what we had even in the early 2000s.
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4's and the Cummins
Aaaaaannnnnnd...the very fortuitous situation we have in the longevity of these beautiful beasts was completely ignored by its creators. 10 years and 150,000 miles...and then buy another. By now we contemplate an ALH car with that mileage as 'young'; so to say, with a Looooong future ahead of it. Things like adding more gear box lubricant( over fill of the O2J ) is just the tip of the iceberg...heh-heh-heh. Not saying that it is an absolute BAD to avoid a catch can, but it for sure will help a bit...

Douglas
 

Judson

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2001
Location
Cheyenne, WY
TDI
2001 Jetta
One question: i’ve never read on these forums that one needs to idle for a minute after driving to let the turbo spin down in order to avoid cooking the oil that’s in the turbo. In other words, if you shut the car down right away the oil stops circulating and the remaining oil in the turbo would get cooked silly, leading to premature failure of the turbo.
But I’ve never done that with my car and I’ve never read about anybody else doing this on these forums, so the question is: did turbo tech change? Is this a gas versus diesel issue?
I don’t think any of the modern gas turbocharged engines require a spool down period so I’m thinking turbo/engine design got better.
????
Jud
 

Fix_Until_Broke

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Location
Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, USA
TDI
03 Jetta, 03 TT TDI
Judson - If you were pulling a trailer or road racing and the EGT's were 1500F+ and you immediately shut the engine off from high load, then there may be some concern about cooking the oil in the turbo.

If you coast/drive easy to the pits or an exit ramp, the EGT's have dropped within seconds and the oil and now much cooler exhaust gasses have been cooling the turbo so with modern (last 20+ years) synthetic oils, there's nothing to be concerned about.

Turbo/engine design is actually running at hotter temperatures - particularly in gasoline engines. It's the oil technology that has advanced.
 

Andyinchville1

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2016
Location
Virginia
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI wagon, 5 sp, 226K miles
One question: i’ve never read on these forums that one needs to idle for a minute after driving to let the turbo spin down in order to avoid cooking the oil that’s in the turbo. In other words, if you shut the car down right away the oil stops circulating and the remaining oil in the turbo would get cooked silly, leading to premature failure of the turbo.
But I’ve never done that with my car and I’ve never read about anybody else doing this on these forums, so the question is: did turbo tech change? Is this a gas versus diesel issue?
I don’t think any of the modern gas turbocharged engines require a spool down period so I’m thinking turbo/engine design got better.
????
Jud
HI,

I think the turbo cool off time mainly has to do with towing heavy and then letting the engine run a few minutes until the turbo temps go down .

For hot shot trucks and others who tow heavy (typically pick up trucks or bigger trucks) there is a Turbo Timer that one can buy where you can turn your truck off as normal and walk away from the vehicle and the timer keeps the engine running for a user selectable amount of time to allow the turbo to cool down before the turbo timer shuts things off .... spares the driver from having to sit in the truck for the extra time while the turbo cools off ....

Theoretically we should do the same if really working the engine but we probably don't work our engines hard enough for the most part to warrant it....

Andrew
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4's and the Cummins
SAAB once did some serious digging into turbo failures in the 99/900 era. The folk who lived at the top of a hill had a higher rate v those at the bottom. Cooling things off before shutdown is still a good idea... :)

Douglas
 

hey_allen

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Location
Altus, OK
TDI
2000 Jetta TDI
I started my car without glow plugs in single digit temperatures...

It wasn't intentional!

It turns out the connector that the earlier cars (AHU?) used, and that I used when replacing my glow plug harness had issues with positive retention of the male terminals and the first truly cold start of the year melted the connector and let the wires back completely apart.
Once I removed the pins from the crispy remains of the make half of the connector and plugged them into the sockets, it started with barely a turn of the key.

Time to rewire the glow plug harness again, without the VW two pin connectors...
 
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Rob Mayercik

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Location
NJ, U.S.A.
TDI
2002 Jetta GLS, Baltic Green/Beige
Had mine towed down to the mechanic yesterday - cranked over once and then not even a click. Turns out the ground braid rusted off, as they occasionally do.

Seeing as it's original, I'm just having a whole new one put in - I think after 492K miles the car's earned a fresh starter (and I imagine the dead one's still good enough to be a rebuildable core).
 

J_dude

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Location
SK Canada
TDI
2003 1.9l “Jedi”
Had mine towed down to the mechanic yesterday - cranked over once and then not even a click. Turns out the ground braid rusted off, as they occasionally do.

Seeing as it's original, I'm just having a whole new one put in - I think after 492K miles the car's earned a fresh starter (and I imagine the dead one's still good enough to be a rebuildable core).
Do it right the first time and get a good one from Mozambiquer, I got a reman Bosch from elsewhere and it was no better than the old one I took out.
 

hey_allen

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Location
Altus, OK
TDI
2000 Jetta TDI
I fixed the glow plug harness on mine, and it apparently decided that I needed to pay it more attention...

I came out to drive to when today and found a lie coolant wasn't, and a leak from the front of the engine bay. It appears to be the pipe from the thermostat housing, so possibly the o-ring finally decided it was done. Such fun to work on in the middle of winter!
 

Mozambiquer

Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Location
Versailles Missouri
TDI
2004 VW Touareg V10 TDI, 2012 Audi Q7 V6 TDI, 1998 VW Jetta TDI. 1982 VW Rabbit pickup, 2001 VW Jetta TDI, 2005 VW Passat wagon TDI X3, 2001 VW golf TDI, 1980 VW rabbit pickup,
Had mine towed down to the mechanic yesterday - cranked over once and then not even a click. Turns out the ground braid rusted off, as they occasionally do.

Seeing as it's original, I'm just having a whole new one put in - I think after 492K miles the car's earned a fresh starter (and I imagine the dead one's still good enough to be a rebuildable core).
That's the motor lead, it is attached to the brush holder inside.
Not hard to rebuild if you look at the link in my signature.
 

Rob Mayercik

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Location
NJ, U.S.A.
TDI
2002 Jetta GLS, Baltic Green/Beige
I realize all that, but it wasn't in the cards to do it myself - I couldn't get it into the garage (in wrong position, and no space), it was starting to snow, and it was 3pm (so only about an hour and half of daylight left). Also, I was concerned about the hardware not coming apart without a fight/breaking things. While I would have liked to tackle this on my own, it just wasn't in the cards this time.
 

Mozambiquer

Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Location
Versailles Missouri
TDI
2004 VW Touareg V10 TDI, 2012 Audi Q7 V6 TDI, 1998 VW Jetta TDI. 1982 VW Rabbit pickup, 2001 VW Jetta TDI, 2005 VW Passat wagon TDI X3, 2001 VW golf TDI, 1980 VW rabbit pickup,
Wouldn't solid copper be a better choice than braid? Here in the salt belt it's always the first thing to fail
The braid flows electricity better, which is why we use stranded wire in vehicles.
Its part of the brush holder assembly as well, so its not a part that gets replaced by itself.
 

P2B

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Location
Toronto & Muskoka, Canada
TDI
2002 Jetta, 2003 Jetta, 2003 Jetta Wagon
The braid flows electricity better, which is why we use stranded wire in vehicles
Actually solid wire has greater current carrying capacity at a given diameter, which is why it's preferred in residential wiring. Stranded wire is used in vehicles because it's greater flexibility makes it more reliable.
 

csstevej

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 12, 2004
Location
north nj
TDI
2001 golf tdi 4 door auto now a manual, mine, 2000 golf 2 door M/T son's,daughters 98 NB non-TDI 2.0, 2003 TDI NB for next daughter, head repaired and on road,glutton for punishment got another tdi 2001NB,another yellow tdi NB
It’s so shiny !!!!🤣
Nice work.
 

The Cream Dolphin

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Location
Fernie, B.C. originally Dwight, ON
TDI
02 VW Golf TDI ALH 245k
Last night I pulled my downpipe with a friend to replace the old flexpipe. The nut on the furst stud came loose, then as I was threading it out, the stud snapped. I dilly dallied a while trying to decide whether to proceed or not, but the other two came of rather easily... So we got the pipe finished, then tried tackling the stud to no avail. I was running out of time in the shop at my work, so for now I bolted it back on with two nuts, and there is no more cabin fumigation on start up, and it is quieter, including lost turbo sound :/ So it appears to not be leaking with the two nuts. I want to fix it properly though. Any advice would be greatly appreciated, I started a thread here.

 

Rrusse11

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2014
Location
PA Deutsch Country
TDI
2002 Golf, 5spd; 05 Jeep CRD
Get some penetrating oil on the broken stud. Drive it, warm it up, and get some more on it.
Hot and cold cycling will help work the lubricant in. After a day or two, give it a good smack,
then try tightening it, yes, tighten. Then try loosening.
 

The Cream Dolphin

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Location
Fernie, B.C. originally Dwight, ON
TDI
02 VW Golf TDI ALH 245k
Get some penetrating oil on the broken stud. Drive it, warm it up, and get some more on it.
Hot and cold cycling will help work the lubricant in. After a day or two, give it a good smack,
then try tightening it, yes, tighten. Then try loosening.
Thanks! I put loads on it, and drove it home. On my next days off I will give it another try.
 

P2B

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Location
Toronto & Muskoka, Canada
TDI
2002 Jetta, 2003 Jetta, 2003 Jetta Wagon
Bought another one :)



2003, 361km, a few rust bubbles starting in the usual spots but overall in great shape. I have done some of the maintenance over the past few years so know it's history. Purchased from a veteran member who wasn't using it much and decided to move on.

Needs the high pressure PS hose replaced so we decided to rent a dolly rather than work outside in the snow and cold.
 
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