What did you do to your MKIV today?

csstevej

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 12, 2004
Location
north nj
TDI
2001 golf tdi 4 door auto now a manual, mine, 2000 golf 2 door M/T son's,daughters 98 NB non-TDI 2.0, 2003 TDI NB for next daughter, head repaired and on road,gluten for punishment got another tdi 2001NB,another yellow tdi NB
Use this link to get you started…..


Do you have the tools to check mechanical timing?
If mechanical timing is good then do above link . Once you know where on the graph your at then you can adjust timing either advance or to retard ……depending on where on the graph your at.
What you would need to do to change timing is with car off …..loosen the three IP sprocket bolts…just crack them loose.
Next take a 7/8 open end wrench and put it on the large center nut on the IP shaft. To advance move it towards the front of the car……very , very , very small amount…….if you really felt it move you went too far.
To retard go towards the firewall….when adjusted tighten the three bolts and repot to see where the new line is…..you will see it doesn’t take much movement to make a big difference on timing….
 
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Fix_Until_Broke

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Location
Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, USA
TDI
03 Jetta, 03 TT TDI
Thanks for the additional info/discussion. The first thing that came to mind was to use some of the cable that is used in robot arms - They're rated for 10,000,000 bend cycles of 180 degrees, Each individual strand of copper is human hair sized or smaller. Figured (hoped?) that the cable would be the same/similar OD as the tube and therefore seal on the grommets between the body and trunk lid. Then I can make the splices up behind the tail light and in the trunk lid where there is no flex happening.

In the Jetta, only one of the wires was ~18 AWG, the rest were ~22-24 AWG. For now, I'll be happy to be able to open my trunk without having to shut the car off :).


You definitely want to make the new connections on the parts of the harness that don't bend. Also use very flexible (silicone housing) stand wire.
Not easy to do on the Jetta trunk, the flex point is too close to where the harness enters the lid. I soldered the wires where they broke, then took a 2-3" length of flat spring steel (from a shoe arch IIRC :)) and bound it to the wire bundle with electrical tape. The idea is to spread the flex, and it seems to work as the repair has lasted 7 years and counting.
If you read my thread it's not easy on the Golf either because of how close the breaks are. Ended up having to pop the hatch cover and cargo side covers, release the harness, pull enough through to work on, make connections in areas where you can push the connection back "through" the grommet on the car side and the other connection is on the hatch side. That flexible wire in the boot now will never get brittle or crack and there are no connections in the boot.

I imagine you'd have to do something similar for the Jetta, sounds like your soldering job worked though and the spring takes up the flex rather than the wires
 

Nuje

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Location
Island near Vancouver
TDI
2002 Golf 6MT; 2015 Sportwagen 6MT; 2016 A3 e-tron 6DSG

You definitely want to make the new connections on the parts of the harness that don't bend. Also use very flexible (silicone housing) stand wire.
There's a couple of different pre-made options available eBay, too.

And because that link will eventually die, Febi 107066 apparently is part number for a replacement.
 

KrashDH

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Location
Washington
TDI
2002 Golf
There's a couple of different pre-made options available eBay, too.

And because that link will eventually die, Febi 107066 apparently is part number for a replacement.
In my thread, I linked to some of those on eBay or similar, might be dead now. But yes, the boots came with the wiring, which was flexible strand. I used a handful of the wires that came with the kit, but it didn't accommodate the larger gauge wiring. I have a decent supply of wire so it wasn't an issue. I also made my own connections as the ones pre crimped on the wore we're garbage. Kit also came with the wiper hose to splice with. Its all in that write up, it's a long one though so I don't expect people to read through it unless they want to complete the repair.

Those kits at the time though I had to wait and get them from Europe as their were no US vendors with them
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4's and the Cummins
The timing adjustment is a bit sensitive, however, get your finger tip in contact with both the pulley and the bolt head. You will be able to sense a far smaller amount of movement that way.

Douglas
 

norbert77

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2022
Location
Petrolia
TDI
01 beetle
I never ever ever cheap out on tires, but i needed a matching set of rims for my beetle, and one was for sale with 75% rubber left for only $120 more than i would have paid for rims alone. So we got it. Got 15,000 miles on it.


upload pic


Now i would like a 17 or 18 and throw some 205 55 rubber on that,
 

csstevej

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 12, 2004
Location
north nj
TDI
2001 golf tdi 4 door auto now a manual, mine, 2000 golf 2 door M/T son's,daughters 98 NB non-TDI 2.0, 2003 TDI NB for next daughter, head repaired and on road,gluten for punishment got another tdi 2001NB,another yellow tdi NB
Wow……did you hit something or did it blow out ?
 

DRP67207

Active member
Joined
Jul 18, 2019
Location
Santa Cruz, CA
TDI
2003 Jetta Wagon TDI 1999 Golf TDI
Yesterday I changed out my wagon roof rails seals, because water was leaking on the retractable cover.
A bit of an old post, but curious what you used for seals and where you got them. I assume you're refering to the seals under the feet of the rails. I'm keeping my eyes out for a set, as the peeling clearcoat on the roof of my wagon is going to need to be addressed at some point and would like to replace these seals with new after a respray. I know a member produced a set several years ago, but I doubt there are any of them around still. Any leads would be appreciated.
 

gmenounos

Vendor
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Location
Watertown, MA, USA
TDI
'99.5 Golf GLS, '01 Jetta GLX Wagon (TDI conversion)
Replaced a dead glow plug in the Golf. I usually clean up the threads with a back tap but the hole was partially blocked by the hard injector lines and the new glow plug didn't want to thread in smoothly. Turns out that a *small* squirt of brake cleaner on the threads of the hole and glow plug gave it just enough lubrication to go in without stripping anything.
 

KrashDH

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Location
Washington
TDI
2002 Golf
Replaced a dead glow plug in the Golf. I usually clean up the threads with a back tap but the hole was partially blocked by the hard injector lines and the new glow plug didn't want to thread in smoothly. Turns out that a *small* squirt of brake cleaner on the threads of the hole and glow plug gave it just enough lubrication to go in without stripping anything.
Not that you can do it now but for future use, a bit of copper (high heat) anti-seize on the threads works wonders. Especially when they have to come out next time
 

gmenounos

Vendor
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Location
Watertown, MA, USA
TDI
'99.5 Golf GLS, '01 Jetta GLX Wagon (TDI conversion)
Changed the oil in the wagon and replaced both Suplex rear springs. A piece had broken off the bottom of each. Not sure what went wrong. Manufacturing defect? The zinc bushings that the springs ride on appear undamaged. I do use this car to tow a small camper a few times a year. I used to have Suplex towing springs but the hitch was a little high with the towing springs. The tongue weight of the camper is only around 100 pounds.

View attachment 117236
While backing the Golf out of the driveway yesterday, I heard a metallic snapping sound, and today my wife found this in front of the house:

Spring.jpg
I will never buy another Suplex spring.
 

csstevej

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 12, 2004
Location
north nj
TDI
2001 golf tdi 4 door auto now a manual, mine, 2000 golf 2 door M/T son's,daughters 98 NB non-TDI 2.0, 2003 TDI NB for next daughter, head repaired and on road,gluten for punishment got another tdi 2001NB,another yellow tdi NB
It’s not jut the suplex springs that break…….
 

red16vdub

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2013
Location
(617) City of CHAMPIONS
TDI
03 JSW 5spd
A bit of an old post, but curious what you used for seals and where you got them. I assume you're refering to the seals under the feet of the rails. I'm keeping my eyes out for a set, as the peeling clearcoat on the roof of my wagon is going to need to be addressed at some point and would like to replace these seals with new after a respray. I know a member produced a set several years ago, but I doubt there are any of them around still. Any leads would be appreciated.
I brought some neoprene rubber material in the same OEM thickness online. I create a template and made my own, no leaks so far, especially after the heavy rain we last week. Problem solve.
 

TDIGAZ

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2008
Location
Eastern Ontario, Canada
TDI
Current: 2003 Jetta GLS Grey 5 spd. Previous: 2003 Jetta GLS Silver 5 spd (lost in a collision)
While backing the Golf out of the driveway yesterday, I heard a metallic snapping sound, and today my wife found this in front of the house:

View attachment 128706
I will never buy another Suplex spring.
I feel your pain...
After replacing a couple sets of Suplex springs for exactly the same issue, I decided to try another brand.
I installed a set of MOOG 81055 rear springs last summer.
The difference in size and thickness compared to a Suplex spring is shown in this thread.
Moog also has info on the spring specs here:
I found the installation of the Moog spring was not as easy as the Suplex spring (because of the overall "stiffness" of the Moog).
I was able to get creative with a large C clamp, not to compress the spring but to actually keep it and move it over into position onto the lower seat. This made the installation a little easier but it was still a "workout" to get the spring seated and positioned correctly without having access to any spring compressors.
I've had the Moogs on for 8 months now and they have settled in nicely without any issues so far, but time will tell.
 

norbert77

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2022
Location
Petrolia
TDI
01 beetle
I feel your pain...
After replacing a couple sets of Suplex springs for exactly the same issue, I decided to try another brand.
I installed a set of MOOG 81055 rear springs last summer.
The difference in size and thickness compared to a Suplex spring is shown in this thread.
Moog also has info on the spring specs here:
I found the installation of the Moog spring was not as easy as the Suplex spring (because of the overall "stiffness" of the Moog).
I was able to get creative with a large C clamp, not to compress the spring but to actually keep it and move it over into position onto the lower seat. This made the installation a little easier but it was still a "workout" to get the spring seated and positioned correctly without having access to any spring compressors.
I've had the Moogs on for 8 months now and they have settled in nicely without any issues so far, but time will tell.
Use ratchet straps, you can loop it around several times and it will hold very well. Each time you loop it around you gain mechanical advantage. I did a chevy tracker IFS lift kit with 3 ratchet straps.
 

GlowBugTDI

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2018
Location
Cambridge, MN
TDI
2001 Beetle GLS TDI (BIODSL). 01 original Glow Bug TDI (sold)
I've put a bit of diesel in gas engine, it runs better, why not try backwards. My cummins runs much better with a bit of gas as well
In the nicest way... that's not even possible for a gas engine to run better with some diesel. Of course the cummins runs better with some gas in it... gas ignites easier. Back to the gas thing gas ignites easier then diesel so its not even possible for it to run better with some diesel. That's like putting 101 octane through an engine set up for 87 octane and saying it runs better... not possible
 

norbert77

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2022
Location
Petrolia
TDI
01 beetle
In the nicest way... that's not even possible for a gas engine to run better with some diesel. Of course the cummins runs better with some gas in it... gas ignites easier. Back to the gas thing gas ignites easier then diesel so its not even possible for it to run better with some diesel. That's like putting 101 octane through an engine set up for 87 octane and saying it runs better... not possible
Theory no, practicality yes. Try it. Ever I put seafoam in a fuel tank?
 

Zak99b5

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Location
Albany NY
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
I used diesel poured straight down he carbs to clean out the motor on my 1700cc bus engine (first pancake engine in the type 2s).
 

GlowBugTDI

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2018
Location
Cambridge, MN
TDI
2001 Beetle GLS TDI (BIODSL). 01 original Glow Bug TDI (sold)
Theory no, practicality yes. Try it. Ever I put seafoam in a fuel tank?
sea foam and diesel aren't close to the same. yes I have used it, but its generally better to just clean the defective or gunked part (unless your talking valves).
why do you think people put diesel in gas engines for smoke effect? It doesn't burn even close to great in a gas engine. This isn't a theory. Its about how fuels burn under compression and how the engine is designed. A 2 stroke can run on plain oil, but that doesn't mean it runs better then on gas (I know that's apples to oranges but its similar). Why because gas burns much easier and faster under lower compression, less heat and spark. Another reason gas helps cold starts (even without gelling).

Your tdi will run on straight gas (for a while), but that doesn't mean it should. If your truly worried about gelling use some antigel.
 
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GlowBugTDI

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2018
Location
Cambridge, MN
TDI
2001 Beetle GLS TDI (BIODSL). 01 original Glow Bug TDI (sold)
I used water poured down the oil filler neck in my gas car to unseize my engine after I lost all the oil. Guess what it ran and drove again. (no joke)

I used diesel poured straight down he carbs to clean out the motor on my 1700cc bus engine (first pancake engine in the type 2s).
Truthfully though there are much better things then diesel to clean valves. You can honestly use water. That's all I can assume you were cleaning? If your trying to clean the carb that won't actually help anything
 

sixmenn

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2014
Location
West Michigan
TDI
2001 VW Jetta TDI manual transmission , 2000 VW Jetta GLS TDI manual transmission
Finally finished up the TB on my new to me Jetta Wagon. Car has been on stands for a couple weeks as I worked on it slowly, in spare time and when it was warm.

TB and all components
Coolant pipe o ring
Misc bolts
Alternator pulley
Tensioner, idler and serpentine belt
EGR cooler delete
Coolant hoses
Vacuum hoses
Valve cover
Thermostat
Oil & Filer
Fuel filter
And probably some stuff I've forgot about.

Still have to clean the manifold, replace the dogbone and locate the belly & lower fender covers.
How did the coolant pipe O ring job go?

Sounds like we’re living parallel lives! My Jetta ( not a wagon ☹) has been in my barn “on the hoist” for the past month doing all the same things you mentioned.
 

P2B

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Location
Toronto & Muskoka, Canada
TDI
2002 Jetta, 2003 Jetta, 2003 Jetta Wagon
Theory no, practicality yes. Try it. Ever I put seafoam in a fuel tank?
A marine mechanic once suggested I put seafoam in my 2-stroke outboard's tank.

It went from running like crap at idle (but fine at speed) to not running at all in a matter of minutes. I assume the seafoam dislodged junk which proceeded to plug the carb jets.

I should have ignored the snake oil advice and just dismantled the carbs for cleaning, it ran flawlessly once I had done so.
 
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