used engine oil down the hatch?

GlowBugTDI

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Jul 20, 2018
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Cambridge, MN
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2001 Beetle GLS TDI (BIODSL). Glow Bug TDI (sold)
Hi all,
Every now and again i research biodiesel and the alike and have thought about making some (this summer maybe) tho who knows if i will actually do it. either way in my researching today i found this article here. If the name of the site doesn't scare you away 😄 from trying this i'm curious if people have tried it. i can kind of see people doing this in trucks, but how about a vw diesel? alh or older most likely.
In the article he says up to 50/50 which sounds like a heck of a lot. am i right? i mean i can see smaller amounts, but that seems like a ton. All i can picture is a quarter mile of black smoke, and a little car storming down the road. I've thrown in some new two stroke oil before to get rid of a soft knock I was hunting down (actually worked 8-10k miles later and no issues when i sold)
Also if it's used (even if filtered) do you really want to/are able to send that through your injection pump and injectors?
maybe this has already been hashed about for years like veggie oil, but i'm curious.

thank you all!
 

2004LB7

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Jun 2, 2013
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California
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2006 Jetta
I occasionally do it but I filter a heck of a lot better then in that article. I have a centrifuge and a string of filters running down to 1 micron. I also thin it with RUG before mixing and filtering. otherwise even when mixed with diesel it is too thick. I can only run a few gallons per tank in my VW but can do about 80% or more in my duramax

google W85 if you want more threads on it
 

miningman

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alberta
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2003 Golf
My understanding is that some big truck rigs used to do this but when the fuel pump was destroyed by minute mettalic particles , they decided it wasnt worth the aggravation.
 

Tarbe

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USA
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Touareg and Sportwagon Sold to VW
I would only consider it at very low ratios (say 2% max) and after good filtration such as described above by @2004LB7. A 1% ratio will easily consume all your used oil between 10k mile changes (this would eat 10 quarts at 40mpg).

Think about it....motor oil is designed to lubricate, not burn. It has additives that resist combustion and are meant to serve as boundary lubrication.

Shoving this stuff through your fuel system (particularly your injectors) should be done only with both eyes wide open.

If we were talking some SA mineral oil with essentially no additives, good filtration would be the main concern. But these modern diesel oils are a different cat.

And if you were doing this in a 1998 Cummins, that would be a somewhat different story as well...but the filtration is still important.
 

GlowBugTDI

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2001 Beetle GLS TDI (BIODSL). Glow Bug TDI (sold)
My understanding is that some big truck rigs used to do this but when the fuel pump was destroyed by minute mettalic particles , they decided it wasnt worth the aggravation.
ok, that's what i would see happening....
 

GlowBugTDI

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Joined
Jul 20, 2018
Location
Cambridge, MN
TDI
2001 Beetle GLS TDI (BIODSL). Glow Bug TDI (sold)
I occasionally do it but I filter a heck of a lot better then in that article. I have a centrifuge and a string of filters running down to 1 micron. I also thin it with RUG before mixing and filtering. otherwise even when mixed with diesel it is too thick. I can only run a few gallons per tank in my VW but can do about 80% or more in my duramax

google W85 if you want more threads on it
i'll have to do some research on that. interesting.
I would only consider it at very low ratios (say 2% max) and after good filtration such as described above by @2004LB7. A 1% ratio will easily consume all your used oil between 10k mile changes (this would eat 10 quarts at 40mpg).

Think about it....motor oil is designed to lubricate, not burn. It has additives that resist combustion and are meant to serve as boundary lubrication.

Shoving this stuff through your fuel system (particularly your injectors) should be done only with both eyes wide open.

If we were talking some SA mineral oil with essentially no additives, good filtration would be the main concern. But these modern diesel oils are a different cat.

And if you were doing this in a 1998 Cummins, that would be a somewhat different story as well...but the filtration is still important.
ok, good to know and it makes sense.

would sending a lot of oil through cause a lot of carbon build up? and or clog the injectors if used in higher amounts?
 

CleverUserName

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Oct 25, 2014
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NorCal
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2014 OZ Cruze CTD & 2010 JSW 6MT
My mechanic bought my old 2003 Jetta and tried running it on 25% WMO. He had a crude filtration system made with filter bags and 5 gal buckets. It worked for a while then the car lost power. He drained the tank and put a new (used) 10mm pump on he sourced from the forum and it runs now. He says he wants to try it again but with a centrifuge for oil filtration prior to mixing.
 

Pat Dolan

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Apr 19, 2002
Location
Martensville, SK
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2003 A4 Variant, 2015 Q7
It is not something I would do without a LOT of thought and care. The filtration comments are spot on: 1 micron nominal does NOT give you 1 micron results, it means that 99% of particles 1 micron or more will be caught. That 1% could do your pump in. Another thing to consider: filtration people lie to the extent of 1 order of magnitude. To get 1 micron absolute, you need to do 0.1 micron CLAIMING to be absolute, not nominal. We handle oil meant for insulating fluids, and particulates destroy the electrical properties (power factor and dielectric strength). This is NOT corner store filtration.

Then there are the additives and contaminants. Not all of them are very happy about burning and can form deposits you wouldn't want.

Then the environmental concerns: Even WMO will burn fairly clean in a modern injection system, as it can atomize sufficiently - BUT: it takes a crapload of energy to make the base oil of lubricants and the best thing you can do (beyond extended drain intervals) is make sure it goes to a base oil recovery "re-refinery". If you don't have access to such a facility's collection network and you still want to burn WMO, the next best thing is to crack it down to fuel. There are several technologies that can be used, but is obviously a LOT more involved than just filtration.
 

GlowBugTDI

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Joined
Jul 20, 2018
Location
Cambridge, MN
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2001 Beetle GLS TDI (BIODSL). Glow Bug TDI (sold)
It is not something I would do without a LOT of thought and care. The filtration comments are spot on: 1 micron nominal does NOT give you 1 micron results, it means that 99% of particles 1 micron or more will be caught. That 1% could do your pump in. Another thing to consider: filtration people lie to the extent of 1 order of magnitude. To get 1 micron absolute, you need to do 0.1 micron CLAIMING to be absolute, not nominal. We handle oil meant for insulating fluids, and particulates destroy the electrical properties (power factor and dielectric strength). This is NOT corner store filtration.

Then there are the additives and contaminants. Not all of them are very happy about burning and can form deposits you wouldn't want.

Then the environmental concerns: Even WMO will burn fairly clean in a modern injection system, as it can atomize sufficiently - BUT: it takes a crapload of energy to make the base oil of lubricants and the best thing you can do (beyond extended drain intervals) is make sure it goes to a base oil recovery "re-refinery". If you don't have access to such a facility's collection network and you still want to burn WMO, the next best thing is to crack it down to fuel. There are several technologies that can be used, but is obviously a LOT more involved than just filtration.
nice write up. seems like a lot of work lol, and that it would almost just be easier to install a waste oil burner for house heat and use that to heat the home.
 

johnsTDI

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Canada,ont North America were Neighbours to usa
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You can make diesel fuel out of burning plastic bags like this guy does... lol but still even after filtering it i would not use it. might be ok to use on small diesel generators, but i doubt it would be ok to use in any TDI But... i will say this its very interesting how burning plastic bags alone can turn into a liquid diesel fuel to be burned amazing!.

 

2004LB7

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Location
California
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2006 Jetta
You can make diesel fuel out of burning plastic bags like this guy does... lol but still even after filtering it i would not use it. might be ok to use on small diesel generators, but i doubt it would be ok to use in any TDI But... i will say this its very interesting how burning plastic bags alone can turn into a liquid diesel fuel to be burned amazing!.

to be clear, they are not "burning" the plastic but instead, cracking the longer chain molecules down into smaller ones closer to diesel and gasoline using heat.
 

GlowBugTDI

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You can make diesel fuel out of burning plastic bags like this guy does... lol but still even after filtering it i would not use it. might be ok to use on small diesel generators, but i doubt it would be ok to use in any TDI But... i will say this its very interesting how burning plastic bags alone can turn into a liquid diesel fuel to be burned amazing!.

very interesting. ya i wouldn't try it in my tdi lol.
to be clear, they are not "burning" the plastic but instead, cracking the longer chain molecules down into smaller ones closer to diesel and gasoline using heat.
I have a friend who has done the same with 50 gal barrels. he made the barrel material into gas and has run it in small motors. He was thinking about trying shingles next, because it is apparently possible though idk if it has been tried before.
 

CleverUserName

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I also talked to some guy on one of these forums about using a solvent to dissolve Styrofoam into a combustible liquid fuel. He said he used it in his 12v 5.9
 

2004LB7

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Location
California
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2006 Jetta
I also talked to some guy on one of these forums about using a solvent to dissolve Styrofoam into a combustible liquid fuel. He said he used it in his 12v 5.9
Have you ever seen what styrofoam looks like when the solvent evaporates out of it? It becomes a hard plastic. Wouldn't want to risk having this happen in my fuel lines, pump and injectors. Also, the amount of solvent needed seems impractical to reach diesel viscosity
 
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