U.S. Comeback?

nwdiver

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2015
Location
Eunice
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI (sold); 2012 Tesla Model S
Oil companies in the U.S., seemed to have 'cooked the books' on Diesel fuel pricing, which has taken away much of the competitive advantage over Petrol. That being said, I plan on driving my 2002 Jetta Wagon, into the ground. Since I am now retired, that will be a long, long time.
Agreed. If I never drove it I would still have my 2003 Jetta TDI. SUPER-cheap car to never drive. Sadly as much as I drive it's just cheaper to convert the sunlight that hits my roof into fuel than to have to pay for diesel (or any other fools fuel derivative like petrol).
 

Pat Dolan

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2002
Location
Martensville, SK
TDI
2003 A4 Variant, 2015 Q7
Pat, what are your thoughts on marine transport?
I must apologize, I missed your post when it was fresh

That is a very large topic (big ship joke, forgive me). Putting a cargo on the water is a very fuel-efficient way of moving stuff, but the real questions are "what are we moving' and "why are we moving it?". Container traffic, for the most part is Chinese garbage with very short lifespan killing of jobs and businesses that once produced longer lasting products with a minimum of transport involved. A lot of bulk cargo - including crude oil - is on the sea to provide the resources that China will containerize to kill of other economies. Worse yet: the bottom of the pit in quality means the resources and environmental costs will be squandered regularly and often to replace said items. The best thing we could do to reduce marine traffic is to REQUIRE products imported into Western economies meet quality, environmental, labour and human rights standards before earning entry.

If you are going to ship by ship, the real effort needs to be in doing so efficiently. Cathedral 2 strokes do better than any other current technology, but they too can benefit from a host of technologies to increase their thermal efficiency. I would love to see cargos under sail instead of power, but the increase in fleet size needed due to the low speed would be very counterproductive. The answer, of course, is NOT to ship at all.
 

kjclow

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Apr 26, 2003
Location
Charlotte, NC
TDI
2010 JSW TDI silver and black. 2017 Ram Ecodiesel dark red with brown and beige interior.
Although it has nothig to do with the title of the thread, the costs of refining and transporting a gallon of diesel fuel and gasoline are basically the same. The percentage of gasoline or diesel out of a barrel of crude is dependent on the type of crude. Once basic refining is done, the heavier distillates, like diesel, can be cracked into lighter offerings, like gasoline. This is related to the supply and demand and often is driven by which fuel is currently making better profit. One thing that makes refining diesel slightly more expensive is the desulfurization step. Adds a few cents per gallon. The finished product is mostly sent through pipelines to most places in the lower 48.

The difference seen at the pump is the goverments share of the pie. State, federal, and local taxes all get a piece.
 
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