Thoughts on keeping/selling my '14 VW JSW TDI?

micahacobb

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Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
TDI
2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
Sorry for the odd question. But I recently bought my wife a new(er) car, and I'm trying to decide whether I should take her old SUV or keep my TDI.

This is the only TDI I've ever had. I enjoy it and like the mpgs! It has 81k miles on it, automatic, no pano, great condition. The only issue I had with it was right after I bought it (used with ~30k miles on it). I had to take it to a dealer, and they had to replace the entire emissions system. Thankfully, it was under warranty.

All that being said, I also like being frugal. Of course, that's what first attracted me to the TDI...the money I could save on fuel. Two things have pushed me towards selling it: Carvana has offered me $9,450 for it -and- I worry about the more expensive repairs that I hear from the horror stories on this forum and others. I know some are related to the emissions system, and since I live in Alabama, I guess I could delete??

My wife's old car, which is what I'd drive if I sold the TDI, is an older model Toyota Sequoia. By reputation, they last forever and are easy to repair and get parts for.

I know a lot of the old alh models were known to last for hundreds of thousands of miles. Is my model TDI a crapshoot once it gets past, say, 150k?
 

Bob S.

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Central MD.
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The old adage: "It all depends..." applies. Your TDI will loose value when the diesel gate warranty expires. But, as fuel prices increase, TDIs will likely increase in valve. These are complex cars. Do you do your own maintenance/work & enjoy working on cars? If not, do you have a trusted guru that you can rely on as VW dealerships are often not known for inexpensive (or good) TDI service. $$$ spent at $100+/hr labor rates can buy a lot of gas for a Toyota.
 

micahacobb

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Location
Auburn, AL
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2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
That's helpful. I use a local mechanic who has some experience working on VW TDIs, but they aren't on the TDIClub's trusted mechanic's list. I don't do my own maintenance.

My commute is less than 2 miles, I live in a small town, can/will use my wife's car for longer trips, etc. So it sounds like selling the TDI would be the most frugal choice....
 

JELLOWSUBMARINE

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2011 JSW 2.0tdi 6m 1983 VW p/u 1.6 IDI 5m
You live in an area that you can delete, to me the it would be a no brainier. The DPF is what gives this otherwise perfect diesel a black eye. I live in a non free state and can only give it a tune. Other than the tune a delete being my 1st choice, this brought the JSW back to great car to own status.

Toyota are great cars too. Hard choice. Let us know.
 

Bob S.

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Location
Central MD.
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A B4V, some ALHs & BRMs
In looking at the asking price of JSWs of similar milage on this & other platforms, the Carvana offered price reads low. IMO, non-pano roof cars are sought after by many. Your stated 2 mile commute is not ideal for TDI usage. If your decision is guided by cost/benefit/etc. , no sense in leaving $$$ on the table. It might be wise to first offer it FS here & elsewhere.
 

JELLOWSUBMARINE

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In looking at the asking price of JSWs of similar milage on this & other platforms, the Carvana offered price reads low. IMO, non-pano roof cars are sought after by many. Your stated 2 mile commute is not ideal for TDI usage. If your decision is guided by cost/benefit/etc. , no sense in leaving $$$ on the table. It might be wise to first offer it FS here & elsewhere.
Carvana quoted ove4 9k? That means it will probably be for sale well over $15k. 2 years ago I got my 69k mile CPO 2011 for 10k out the door. ALTHOUGH I believe I got a freak good deal These are really holding value. Its been mentioned they may increase in value in the future. IMHO think that's the direction too.

Past ownership and foresite is huge on longevity. The sooner the DPF killing dieselgate tune is gone, the better. I gave up 1 year (maybe) of emmisions warranty to SAVE my new DPF. If (when) I would need another it would be out of warranty and I would be held to a $2k customer pay bill...

Delete able or non delete...
 

turbobrick240

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maine
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2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
OP sounds like a straight shooter. I don't think violating federal law with an emissions delete would be a good fit for him. If he can find a good deal on something like a Chevy Volt, that would suit his needs well, imo.
 

micahacobb

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
TDI
2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
Haha...I am a Christian minister, so I'm not sure that violating federal law would be a good career move (even though I lean very libertarian). I do bike/walk sometimes, but I have a lot of meetings all over the place so I often need a car nearby.

There aren't a ton of '14 VW JSW TDIs for sale with comparable mileage, but my impression was that I wouldn't be able to get much more than Carvana was offering me. Vroom offered $7k. But if y'all think I can, I don't mind trying to sell it in a private deal.

My ultimate concern is longer-term reliability/hassle/expense. I don't mind keeping the TDI and not getting the money from selling it (my Sequoia is worth about $2k). I just don't want to keep sinking dollar after dollar into it to keep it running past, say, 150k.
 

rocky raccoon

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2014 Jetta Sportwagen
Point is; if you continuously use your TDI for short commutes, you WILL sink dollar after dollar into it. Too bad that "they" had to take a basically simple engine like a Diesel and believed they had to complicate it beyond any gasser.

You sound like an ideal battery electric or at least hybrid driver. No shame in it.
 

JELLOWSUBMARINE

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2011 JSW 2.0tdi 6m 1983 VW p/u 1.6 IDI 5m
Yup with no hanky panky to the DPF you haven't a prayer.2 mile commutes will do it in.

Plug in electrics are perfect for that.
 

Bob S.

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Central MD.
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It is often said that the cheapest car one can own is the one currently owned. Given you own the Toyota, keep & drive it. Tag, title, sales tax on buying something else with the added depreciation of a different car can add up & purchase much gas, especially w/ a 2 mile commute that you say you often walk &/or bike (also, it gives you a great excuse to purchase a high end bike).
 

micahacobb

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Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
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2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
So I finally had a chance to sit down and calculate the miles I drive daily. Since Sept 1, 2018, I have averaged 38 miles/day. That surprised me. Though I don't have a long commute, I do take frequent trips to neighboring cities, or to visit family (200 miles roundtrip).

That means I spend about $1k a year on diesel, and would spend about $2.3k on gas for the Sequoia. That's a bigger difference in fuel costs than I would've thought.
 

JELLOWSUBMARINE

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So I finally had a chance to sit down and calculate the miles I drive daily. Since Sept 1, 2018, I have averaged 38 miles/day. That surprised me. Though I don't have a long commute, I do take frequent trips to neighboring cities, or to visit family (200 miles roundtrip).

That means I spend about $1k a year on diesel, and would spend about $2.3k on gas for the Sequoia. That's a bigger difference in fuel costs than I would've thought.
The average really doesn't matter in your case if your doing its 200 miles at a time. That's actually a big plus for the active regenerating cycles.

I acually mirror your scenerio with a Toyota senna and TDI JSW. The Sienna @17 MPG limits it to things my JSW can't do. At 38 to over 45 MPG, for me, the TDI jusifies a little extra effort, expense and hassle.


Cars are like underwear, different pairs for different occasions. Or at minimum one for each day of the week.
 

hskrdu

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Maryland and New England
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2003 Golf GLS 4D 5M, 2015 GSW SE 6M
Your SW has 81k on it.
You have averaged 38 miles per day for the last 2.5 years (the equivalent of 14,000 miles a year).
With no significant changes, you won't hit 150k miles until 2026 (check my math).
You're ultimate concern (posted above) was about high maint costs after 150 k miles.

Suggestions:
(1) Wait until you approach 150,000 miles in 2026 and reevaluate.
(2) Don't approach maint costs as anything other than part of your TCO calculation. In other words, you aren't "sinking dollar after dollar."

After depreciation, fuel costs are the second biggest factor (in most cases) in Total Cost of Ownership. The longer you keep your TDI, and the more miles you drive, the more the TCO will skew in favor of the Sportwagen over the Sequoia. This comparison rate will slow (or even out) if your mileage (and fuel expenditures) drop, or if you have catastrophic repair expenses for either vehicle (enough to outweigh the differential in fuel expenditures over the next 5 or 10 years). If you have saved receipts, you can generate a reasonable prediction of TCO expressed as a cost per mile. See my TCO thread for evaluating the many factors, which are rarely presented in a comprehensive manner in the media.

As for the risk of catastrophic repair expenses, there are two primary things I would consider: First, I'd see if you can gather accurate maintenance cost data from high-mileage SW owners. Gathering thoughts, cautions, and warnings may reveal some good opinions, but not much data. It's also important to keep in mind that for every high cost maint anecdote that compels someone to post on the internet, there are multiples of other owners who have a different experience and have no cause to post. This is why accurate data is important. Second, consider what you will do with a $3,000 repair bill for either car. It's easy to see the "low" value of the Sequoia and lose track of TCO calculations, much like when someone suggests to avoid repair work based on the calculation that "the cost of repairs is more than the value of the car." This is a sign that they either don't understand TCO, or that they simply are using the wrong argument to justify an action. If a $3,000 repair bill to the Sequoia will result in the purchase of a replacement car, the total expenditures will likely outweigh the repair cost to the SW.

The comparison in probability of maint costs between the two vehicles is not something I can guess about. Certainly there are readers here who may claim the Sequoia will not likely produce a catastrophic repair expense, while the SW may. Again, you need better data to compare. I would just add to the discussion that many diesel drivers in Europe also do lots of short trips, and you improve your chances of avoiding a catastrophic repair expense by modifying some driving behaviors (the 200 mile trips help), or by taking some preventative measures.

Lastly, if frugality is the ultimate goal, then certainly you should do a 10 year TCO estimate between the two vehicles and simply do the math, including the incoming funds from sale of the SW.
 

micahacobb

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
TDI
2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
Ok...dumb question perhaps...but I am curious about how my DPF is doing. I’ve seen some people post pics of their multifunction display with info about ash load, etc. how can I see that? I can’t find it on my display.
The average really doesn't matter in your case if your doing its 200 miles at a time. That's actually a big plus for the active regenerating cycles.
 

JELLOWSUBMARINE

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2011 JSW 2.0tdi 6m 1983 VW p/u 1.6 IDI 5m
Ok...dumb question perhaps...but I am curious about how my DPF is doing. I’ve seen some people post pics of their multifunction display with info about ash load, etc. how can I see that? I can’t find it on my display.
This may help The "diesel gate retune" is really hard on your already weak spot in these cars. It has yet to be seen exactly how bad but some have gone thrust multiple DPFs since. The polar fis unit has helped me watch and take minimal steps to avoid issues related to its health. The dieseslgate tune being a big issue though.


IMO the DPF is one of the biggest item to be conscious of on these cars. Its been discussed here that these are great cars for a conscientious driver but for your average "gas n go" daughter in college... Probably not your 1st choice.
 
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ticaf

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baltimore, MD
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2015 Golf SW S Manual TDI
My 2 cents...

First, it is hard to compare a Toyota Sequoia and a Jetta Wagon. That is a personal preference only you can decide for yourself.
Second, yes fuel cost is cheaper with a Jetta (gas or diesel) than a full size SUV like a Sequoia, but again it is not the same car. The Sequoia is probably a nicer and safer car for longer trip.
Third, the offer you got for you Jetta is honest IMO, I'd go for it. The Jetta is still depreciating, and I suppose the Sequoia has reached the bottom in term of depreciation.
Forth, with the TDIs you have to consider long term repair/maintenance that you would not have compared with a gas vehicle:
* DPF replacement
* Dual Mass Flywheel replacement
* clogged EGR/intake
* other emissions related issues
* possible expensive injectors/HPFP replacement

Unfortunately, TDI parts are expensive and competent mechanics are rare and few. I think now that we are 6 years post diesel gate, TDIs should only be reserved for the enthusiasts, not for those who would believe of lower TCO without sweating.
 

micahacobb

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
TDI
2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
My 2 cents...

First, it is hard to compare a Toyota Sequoia and a Jetta Wagon. That is a personal preference only you can decide for yourself.
Second, yes fuel cost is cheaper with a Jetta (gas or diesel) than a full size SUV like a Sequoia, but again it is not the same car. The Sequoia is probably a nicer and safer car for longer trip.
Third, the offer you got for you Jetta is honest IMO, I'd go for it. The Jetta is still depreciating, and I suppose the Sequoia has reached the bottom in term of depreciation.
Forth, with the TDIs you have to consider long term repair/maintenance that you would not have compared with a gas vehicle:
* DPF replacement
* Dual Mass Flywheel replacement
* clogged EGR/intake
* other emissions related issues
* possible expensive injectors/HPFP replacement

Unfortunately, TDI parts are expensive and competent mechanics are rare and few. I think now that we are 6 years post diesel gate, TDIs should only be reserved for the enthusiasts, not for those who would believe of lower TCO without sweating.
ticaf, that was really helpful.

I've spent my lunchtime doing a 5 year TCO for the two cars, as hskrdu recommended above. The only thing I don't know how to estimate is maintenance, but assuming that at the end of those 5 yrs the Sequoia is worthless and the TDI is worth a few thousand. Then there is a similar cost of ownership between the two -- but that is without maintenance included.

I'd just logged back into the forums to start to get an estimate of reasonable cost of ownership of the '14 JSW when I saw your post. So, since the fuel savings for the JSW cancel out the money I'd make off selling it, then it seems reasonable that the least expensive car would be the one with the lower maintenance costs. Seems like it is unlikely that the Sequoia would be more expensive, even though it's older. Cheap repairs, and half my friends can work on it in their backyard.

I appreciate all the help.

I think I'm going to sell the JSW and then keep my keys open for a reliable older sedan that I can swap out my Sequoia for.
 

hskrdu

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Joined
Oct 17, 2003
Location
Maryland and New England
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2003 Golf GLS 4D 5M, 2015 GSW SE 6M
Not to muddy the waters, but I'd just suggest to be accurate in your numbers, where possible. Obviously most of my long term calculations on TCO are from our various ALH's, but you should be able to gather costs for CRs. I have found (again, with the ALH) that maint costs are not higher than national averages, and maint costs are low enough in comparison to depreciation and fuel costs (over the long term), that the TDI wins against national averages again and again. As said, this does not take into account a catastrophic repair expense, which I haven't experienced, and which (if emissions related) is covered for your car until that specific warranty has run out. You should also be careful in underestimating resale value. The value dipped with low fuel prices and the release of buyback and stop-sale cars, but traditionally has been quite high- and if fuel prices rise post COVID, FE cars, especially TDI wagons, will remain desirable in the marketplace.

A few other thoughts:

As ticaf said, deciding which car to keep or to drive is always partially personal preference. While it is hard to compare between different vehicle types, one way on which we can do it is via TCO. Financial reasoning is rarely anyone's final guide regarding cars and trucks, but it does level the playing field either via TCO, or by comparing cost per mile.

Depreciation: You can argue that there is a "sweet spot" for lowering the impact that depreciation has on TCO, for example, by selling a car when it has its highest resale value in the market. This is fair, and it is why the worst hit to TCO occurs over the first two years or so. There is another way to lower the impact of depreciation on TCO, and that's to keep the car longer. TDIs do especially well here, since unlike a comparable gasser, they have generally shown to hit a base value (depending on year, mileage, condition), and hold that value for quite some time. This is why, for example, we still see nice MkIV's selling in the $4,000 range, while their gasoline cousins fetch hundreds or sit in junk yards. Even as that base price falls, if you can amortize (is that the right word?) the cost of depreciation over time, you will reduce it as a factor of TCO, and lower your TCO, if not your cost per mile.

As for maint comparisons, I'd be careful about reaching conclusions without gathering data. TDI owners sometimes like to cite a long list of why their cars are lower in cost to maintain than a gasoline car, but don't cite TDI specific maint costs. ticaf did the opposite, and provided a good list about which there may be concern (especially when the emissions warranty no longer covers many of those items), but the Sequoia, as it ages, will provide its own list of items that need attention- as will other replacement cars.

Value: If a national company provided you with a quote, you know their extensive TMV data reveals it's worth more.

I didn't understand the statement "So, since the fuel savings for the JSW cancel out the money I'd make off selling it..."

Personal preference: No knock against the Sequoia, but there are few places I'd rather be when driving than behind the wheel of a TDI.
 

micahacobb

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
TDI
2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
Not to muddy the waters, but I'd just suggest to be accurate in your numbers, where possible. Obviously most of my long term calculations on TCO are from our various ALH's, but you should be able to gather costs for CRs. I have found (again, with the ALH) that maint costs are not higher than national averages, and maint costs are low enough in comparison to depreciation and fuel costs (over the long term), that the TDI wins against national averages again and again. As said, this does not take into account a catastrophic repair expense, which I haven't experienced, and which (if emissions related) is covered for your car until that specific warranty has run out. You should also be careful in underestimating resale value. The value dipped with low fuel prices and the release of buyback and stop-sale cars, but traditionally has been quite high- and if fuel prices rise post COVID, FE cars, especially TDI wagons, will remain desirable in the marketplace.

A few other thoughts:

As ticaf said, deciding which car to keep or to drive is always partially personal preference. While it is hard to compare between different vehicle types, one way on which we can do it is via TCO. Financial reasoning is rarely anyone's final guide regarding cars and trucks, but it does level the playing field either via TCO, or by comparing cost per mile.

Depreciation: You can argue that there is a "sweet spot" for lowering the impact that depreciation has on TCO, for example, by selling a car when it has its highest resale value in the market. This is fair, and it is why the worst hit to TCO occurs over the first two years or so. There is another way to lower the impact of depreciation on TCO, and that's to keep the car longer. TDIs do especially well here, since unlike a comparable gasser, they have generally shown to hit a base value (depending on year, mileage, condition), and hold that value for quite some time. This is why, for example, we still see nice MkIV's selling in the $4,000 range, while their gasoline cousins fetch hundreds or sit in junk yards. Even as that base price falls, if you can amortize (is that the right word?) the cost of depreciation over time, you will reduce it as a factor of TCO, and lower your TCO, if not your cost per mile.

As for maint comparisons, I'd be careful about reaching conclusions without gathering data. TDI owners sometimes like to cite a long list of why their cars are lower in cost to maintain than a gasoline car, but don't cite TDI specific maint costs. ticaf did the opposite, and provided a good list about which there may be concern (especially when the emissions warranty no longer covers many of those items), but the Sequoia, as it ages, will provide its own list of items that need attention- as will other replacement cars.

Value: If a national company provided you with a quote, you know their extensive TMV data reveals it's worth more.

I didn't understand the statement "So, since the fuel savings for the JSW cancel out the money I'd make off selling it..."

Personal preference: No knock against the Sequoia, but there are few places I'd rather be when driving than behind the wheel of a TDI.
Thank you. I am planning to fine-tune the spreadsheet to further the analysis. I don't enjoy driving the Sequoia, but I don't mind driving it if that's the most reasonable choice. Your advice to look out over multiple years was really helpful. I thought that it was *obviously* cheaper to keep the Sequoia, but it'll be pretty close.

There are a lot of factors I need to try to dial in more closely. I don't know how to estimate the maintenance costs very exactly, for either.

What I meant by "since the fuel savings for the JSW cancel out the money I'd make off selling it..." -- which was a poorly-worded statement, I acknowledge -- was that, even though I can sell the JSW for more than the Sequoia, the fuel savings cancels that out. I've been offered $9.5k through Carvana for it (I am trying to sell it for more privately before I sell it to them), but I can't get that much out of the Sequoia (it's a 2005 model). But the fuel savings from the added fuel efficiency means that, over five years, the extra money I'd get from selling the VW would be fully consumed by fuel costs.
 

micahacobb

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
TDI
2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
Called and checked on my TDI Extended Warranty. I am still covered until 120,000 miles. 40,000 more miles to go. That surely changes the cost/benefit analysis.

Also, VW replaced all the emissions-related components around 46,000 miles. So I guess all those components have less than 40,000 miles on them.
 

JELLOWSUBMARINE

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Location
yes
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2011 JSW 2.0tdi 6m 1983 VW p/u 1.6 IDI 5m
Be careful of the dreaded "paralysis by analysis"

You have a relatively low mile 80k JSW with apx. 35k on new emmisions components. Do you know the specific replaced components? I.E.. DPF, HPFP, injectors ...? I say this because if the DPF, for example, was not replaced then it most certainly will need done within the next 40k of coverage. That's good, You could have a fresh start on a solid tune upgrade at that time. IMO if there is anything that will take these cars off the road its the DPF clogging dieselgate soot filthy retune that's killing these cars. Even if the original VW tune took out your $2k DPF out in 46k miles your probably real close now for another?.


I've owned 5 diesels and they have been great but this is my 1st DPF diesel. I've never tuned before this one but made the decision to non delete tune and am very happy I made that call. Let me say to the greener than thous argument about pollution is not valid, as even a bare CR TDI emmisions still run circles around about any other diesel out there, let alone the carbon footprint of a Prius. EPAs ultimate goal is to remove carbon fuels starting with diesel.

Long story short...The non delete tune is minimal cost, ez to do. No issue with (Ca.) smog check, will keep all emmisions. components in place and functioning. Soot production and DPF temperature dramatic reduction, it will keep the system operating clean FAR longer than EPAs emmisions wrecking tune. Increased mpg and driveability. Win-Win. Great long term car. As far as the federal emmisions argument, if your state doesn't restrict you to delete that's another vitamin pill for your cars health although at a slight emmisions cost
 

micahacobb

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
TDI
2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
From the paperwork (2/14/19; car @ 53,449 miles):

Customer states check engine light on. Customer states glow plug light comes on intermittently and goes into limp mode.

V/C EN3 EGR Assembly

Performed diagnosis and found code P2002 Particulate Trap Bank 1 Efficiency Below Threshold And P240F Exhaust Gas Recirculation Slow Response, P0401 Exhaust Gas Recirc. Flow Insufficient Detected and P0299 Turbo/Super Charger Underboost.

Performed test plans with test drive and found low side EGR system not passing.

Contacted VW Techline 2440318 and was informed to replace EGR Cooler Assembly with New DPF and EGR Filter. Removed required items and replaced EGR cooler with new gaskets and bolts along with particulate filter with new egr low side filter with all new hardware.

Torqued all items as per ELSA Pro. Performed adaptation for New DPF assembly. System passed with 0.00 Gram of Soot. Test drove vehicle with no issues.
Typed out as is in the Labor description; for parts, besides, bolts, gaskets, grommets, nuts, and clips, what's listed is a "Cooler", "Pipe", "Exhaust Pipe", "Seal Ring", and "Core Return"

Hope that is helpful


(And I'm deep into analysis paralysis :))
 

hskrdu

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Oct 17, 2003
Location
Maryland and New England
TDI
2003 Golf GLS 4D 5M, 2015 GSW SE 6M
Ok...dumb question perhaps...but I am curious about how my DPF is doing. I’ve seen some people post pics of their multifunction display with info about ash load, etc. how can I see that? I can’t find it on my display.
I think monitoring the DPF and regens is important. I use an app called VAG DPF with an adroid phone I found on ebay for cheap. It's an excellent app, and requires very little user effort, but it's not available for iphone. I also just got an app called OBD Fusion, which works on iphone, but isn't as focused on the DPF as the other app, and requires some user effort to set up (which I haven't figured out past the initial stage). There are much more elegant monitoring solutions, but those are more costly.
 

hskrdu

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Location
Maryland and New England
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2003 Golf GLS 4D 5M, 2015 GSW SE 6M
With 40,000 miles left on your emissions warranty, and a new DPF installed by VW at 53k, I'd keep it and revisit your concerns and calculations in a few years. You'll have more data to go on for TCO estimates, and have had time to evaluate lots of options without any rush. If you sell the Sequoia, you'll have a mini-fund set aside for routine maintenance on the JSW.
 

micahacobb

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Location
Auburn, AL
TDI
2014 JSW TDI, auto, 81k miles
Yes. I'm in the midst of "analysis paralysis." Only kinda, though. Someone is probably buying my VW on Wednesday morning. However, I took hskrdu's advice and built out a "true cost of ownership" model for the next five years.

But if anyone would check my work, I'd appreciate it. One key component was estimating the cost of recurring maintenance and common repairs mentioned on the forums and elsewhere for the JSW. I still have 40k on the emissions warranty, so I didn't include the possibility of repairs connected to it, even after the warranty is over. I couldn't decide how to account for it.

Anyway, I "annualized" the maintenance/repairs based on driving 14,000 miles a year. (So an oil change every 10k miles would be 1.4 oil changes a year.)

As I mentioned earlier in the thread, I don't do my own work. I could probably learn to do basic things, but I'd be started from the basics. So I priced it (as best I could) as if I paid someone to do the maintenance/repairs, not as if I was doing it myself and just paying for parts.

 

Bob S.

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 17, 2006
Location
Central MD.
TDI
A B4V, some ALHs & BRMs
From the outside looking in, this is causing too much anxiety. The Toyota will do what you need in a car. If fuel gets too expensive, get a Prius. Move on & enjoy life & the things the good Lord has blessed you with. In the end, a car & the savings are not worth it. Devote the time to your family and doing the work that the Lord has called you to do.
 
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