Thinking of buying 2010 Jetta TDI manual

Froginluv

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2016
Location
Chicago
TDI
2010 Jetta TDI manual, 2005 Golf GLS TDI, previous 2002 Jetta TDI auto
Fellow TDI enthusiasts,

I am thinking of buying a 2010 Jetta TDI manual, 1-owner, low miles for its age (70K miles). It got the emission fix, has a trailer hitch so it likely was used for hauling.
Have not done test drive yet (out of state), looks like car is not driven much, at least for the past 6 months, timing belt not done yet, struts/shocks/rotors likely not done as well.
Any specific items that I should be concerned with when checking the car :confused::confused:?
Pros and cons for buying this year versus say 2011-2015 TDIs?

Thank you in advance for your valuable inputs.
 

jetlagmech

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Location
Toledo, WA
TDI
2010 jetta
I have 2010 Jetta Manual. Does not have fix and don't plan on getting rid of it anytime soon. One common trouble spot to check.... lock car then walk around and check if all doors are locked. then unlock it and walk around and check if all doors are unlocked. The lock actuators are common to fail. The 2010's, they can be disassembled and brush commutator cleaned. but it can be a price negotiation spot. I had 2 fail on my car. There are threads on this.

Cons would be the HPFP failure rates are higher than on the 11's and newer.

Pros would be no DEF fluid like on the 12's and newer.

I haven't done shocks or struts on my car and its still riding nice. 178,000 miles.

Is car being sold by dealer or private seller. Be careful of private seller that has only owned car short time. I will think about it and maybe come back with a few other things to look for on test drive.
 

jetlagmech

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Location
Toledo, WA
TDI
2010 jetta
Oh yea. run your finger in the tailpipe to see if its sooty. That indicates a cracked DPF, will get a fault light in a few months. If car covered under the extended dieselgate warranty its covered, but parts are on several month backorder. And there are a few 2010 that have the older 2009 DPF's that they cant get parts for. I remember someone on here reporting this problem with their car.
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
In my opinion the 2010 is a much better Jetta to own than the '11-15 cars. VW significantly de-contented the '11s because the MKV ('05-10) was too expensive to build. There are a lot of differences between the cars, and in general the MKV has more sophisticated design, better suspension, and a better interior than its successor. If you've found a nice one I'd grab it.

It'll have some typical MKV issues, but overall I think you'll be really happy with it.
 

soot1

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Location
Houston, TX
TDI
Currently none. Formerly: 2010 VW Jetta TDI 6M, 1993 Dodge Ram W250 Cummins 5M 4WD, 1990 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1986 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1980 VW Uabbit Diesel 4M. Currently driving 2018 Toyota 4Runner SR5 4WD.
In my opinion the 2010 is a much better Jetta to own than the '11-15 cars. VW significantly de-contented the '11s because the MKV ('05-10) was too expensive to build. There are a lot of differences between the cars, and in general the MKV has more sophisticated design, better suspension, and a better interior than its successor. If you've found a nice one I'd grab it.

It'll have some typical MKV issues, but overall I think you'll be really happy with it.
I totally agree with the above. The word "de-contented" is a very polite way to say that the 2011+ models were bastardized, cheaply-made knockoffs of the 2009/2010 models. I cannot offer any insight into the qualities of the after-dieselgate performance as I sold mine back to VW, but I can still chime in on what my impression of the vehicle was before the "fix" was applied. Here is a list of issues I encountered in 9 years of owning a 2010 Jetta with 6-speed manual:

1. Minor oil leak from the intercooler inlet hose. Known issue, I've never bothered to fix it as this was likely a design intent. During each 10k oil change, I disconnected both the inlet and the outlet hoses, cleaned thoroughly with hot water and dish detergent, reassembled, and that was it for the next 10k miles.

2. Minor oil leak from the turbo oil return line on the lower back side of the engine. I ignored this nuisance for the first 5 years, then decided to fix it. This leak is caused by the wrong size of o-ring located in the banjo bolt that secures the return line to the engine block. Fix is very easy, but you will have to jack up the front end: remove the banjo bolt, wash everything in solvent, apply silicone sealant instead of the o-ring (alternately, leave the cleaned o-ring in place and apply the silicone over the o-ring), reassemble, allow 24 hours for the silicone to cure, and you are done.

3. Gas struts on the trunk lid - both went limp on me after about 5 years of service. Replacement is a 5-minute job, no tools required, but OEM struts will set you back about 25 dollars each. You know the struts failed if they don't automatically lift the trunk after unlocking it.

4. Glow plug #1 died on me. Replacement is super easy, but at that time, I paid $100 for a new one. They may be cheaper now. You will need a 12mm, 6-pointed deep socket and a torque wrench as these plugs are extremely fragile and eyeballing the tightening torque may destroy your $100 investment.

5. Faulty door lock module on driver's door, as mentioned by Jetlagmech. Very common issue on all four doors, but can be fixed at almost zero cost on 2010 models because the modules from that model year can be taken apart. That is no longer the case on newer models (not sure about the cutoff year), where these $150 modules are completely sealed, and I don't know if they can be taken apart without destroying them.

6. At low ambient temperatures (50 degrees and below), the small display on the dash between speedo and tacho would not illuminate. It came on only when the temperature inside the car climbed above that threshold.

7. Erratic radio behavior - upon starting the engine, the large display on the center console is supposed to display the time. It was hit or miss with about 1 failure in 10 starts. No big deal, I just turned the radio on and off, and the clock stayed on after that.

8. The OEM Continental tires were garbage, although if the car has 70k on the clock, I assume they were replaced by now. I had to get rid of them at 25k due to the intolerable noise they made.

That is about all I can think of right now. Overall, I was happy with the vehicle and how it performed. Just before diesel gate blew wide open, I was exploring what it would take to delete the EGR, DPF and the other emissions stuff, but the scandal broke soon after, and the delete idea became a moot point.
 

Froginluv

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2016
Location
Chicago
TDI
2010 Jetta TDI manual, 2005 Golf GLS TDI, previous 2002 Jetta TDI auto
I totally agree with the above. The word "de-contented" is a very polite way to say that the 2011+ models were bastardized, cheaply-made knockoffs of the 2009/2010 models. I cannot offer any insight into the qualities of the after-dieselgate performance as I sold mine back to VW, but I can still chime in on what my impression of the vehicle was before the "fix" was applied. Here is a list of issues I encountered in 9 years of owning a 2010 Jetta with 6-speed manual:
1. Minor oil leak from the intercooler inlet hose. Known issue, I've never bothered to fix it as this was likely a design intent. During each 10k oil change, I disconnected both the inlet and the outlet hoses, cleaned thoroughly with hot water and dish detergent, reassembled, and that was it for the next 10k miles.
2. Minor oil leak from the turbo oil return line on the lower back side of the engine. I ignored this nuisance for the first 5 years, then decided to fix it. This leak is caused by the wrong size of o-ring located in the banjo bolt that secures the return line to the engine block. Fix is very easy, but you will have to jack up the front end: remove the banjo bolt, wash everything in solvent, apply silicone sealant instead of the o-ring (alternately, leave the cleaned o-ring in place and apply the silicone over the o-ring), reassemble, allow 24 hours for the silicone to cure, and you are done.
3. Gas struts on the trunk lid - both went limp on me after about 5 years of service. Replacement is a 5-minute job, no tools required, but OEM struts will set you back about 25 dollars each. You know the struts failed if they don't automatically lift the trunk after unlocking it.
4. Glow plug #1 died on me. Replacement is super easy, but at that time, I paid $100 for a new one. They may be cheaper now. You will need a 12mm, 6-pointed deep socket and a torque wrench as these plugs are extremely fragile and eyeballing the tightening torque may destroy your $100 investment.
5. Faulty door lock module on driver's door, as mentioned by Jetlagmech. Very common issue on all four doors, but can be fixed at almost zero cost on 2010 models because the modules from that model year can be taken apart. That is no longer the case on newer models (not sure about the cutoff year), where these $150 modules are completely sealed, and I don't know if they can be taken apart without destroying them.
6. At low ambient temperatures (50 degrees and below), the small display on the dash between speedo and tacho would not illuminate. It came on only when the temperature inside the car climbed above that threshold.
7. Erratic radio behavior - upon starting the engine, the large display on the center console is supposed to display the time. It was hit or miss with about 1 failure in 10 starts. No big deal, I just turned the radio on and off, and the clock stayed on after that.
8. The OEM Continental tires were garbage, although if the car has 70k on the clock, I assume they were replaced by now. I had to get rid of them at 25k due to the intolerable noise they made.
That is about all I can think of right now. Overall, I was happy with the vehicle and how it performed. Just before diesel gate blew wide open, I was exploring what it would take to delete the EGR, DPF and the other emissions stuff, but the scandal broke soon after, and the delete idea became a moot point.
Thank you so much @soot1 for the detailed lists, much appreciated. Also thank you for your inputs @jetlagmech and @IndigoBlueWagon.
It is also my understanding that 05-10 Jetta was of better build quality and design...Also insurance is much cheaper as well for me :D :D
I am planning to get an ECU tune after the emission warranty expires. Heard Malone Stage 2 was the best compromise dollar/performance gain. Any take :confused:?
 

oilhammer

Certified Volkswagen Nut & Vendor
Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Location
outside St Louis (where it's safe)
TDI
There are just too many to list....
2010 was the last year of the "real" Jetta, that is, a sedan version of the Golf. It is a better car than the 2011+ NCS Jetta, which was severely decontented. The base price dropped a whopping seven grand, too, so that should tell you something. Not that the NCS is "bad", but those that got the TDI engine got a cheap car with an expensive engine. Seriously, the 2011 Jetta starting price was $1k less than a Scion iQ, and that was only half a car!

If you found one with sub-100k miles, and a manual to boot, you've got a great find!
 

Froginluv

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2016
Location
Chicago
TDI
2010 Jetta TDI manual, 2005 Golf GLS TDI, previous 2002 Jetta TDI auto
Drove 6hr down south to KY, test drove...and loved it so brought the Jetta back home.
1-owner, 65k Miles, all struts/shocks and rotors/pads replaced...and full tank. Sub $6.5k so I consider it as a great deal. :D:D:D





First full tank, but I should get around 500 miles. I think the dieselgate fix hurts it a bit... What was your average for 2020 Jetta TDI manual?
 
Last edited:

soot1

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Location
Houston, TX
TDI
Currently none. Formerly: 2010 VW Jetta TDI 6M, 1993 Dodge Ram W250 Cummins 5M 4WD, 1990 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1986 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1980 VW Uabbit Diesel 4M. Currently driving 2018 Toyota 4Runner SR5 4WD.
What was your average for 2020 Jetta TDI manual?
There is no such thing as 2020 Jetta TDI manual, not in this country, anyways. The last model year sold here was the 2016.
 

johnsTDI

Veteran Member
Joined
May 25, 2019
Location
Canada,ont North America were Neighbours to usa
TDI
2012 Highline
I got a 4 cyl 2012 TDI 6 speed Manual that does away using DEF fluid because its not the 3.0Liter 2010 found on jetta tdi's mine was Dealer mantained from new, and i really like it Lots of Low end torque right off the line & awesome fuel Economy on Highway Cumute. :) so far its been a great vehicle to own...!! Cheers :)
 

Froginluv

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2016
Location
Chicago
TDI
2010 Jetta TDI manual, 2005 Golf GLS TDI, previous 2002 Jetta TDI auto
There is no such thing as 2020 Jetta TDI manual, not in this country, anyways. The last model year sold here was the 2016.
LOL...typo :D:D:D. I obviously meant 2010 Jetta TDI Manual (like mine) for comparison
 

Froginluv

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2016
Location
Chicago
TDI
2010 Jetta TDI manual, 2005 Golf GLS TDI, previous 2002 Jetta TDI auto
Also, I know that most owners of '09 and '10 Jetta TDI sold them back to VW, but anyone had Malone tuning on their car? I am thinking of going Stage 2 but unsure since the car has the emission fix done in 10/2017 or 11k miles ago so don't want to void the Extended Emission Warranty.
Any thought :confused:
 

soot1

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Location
Houston, TX
TDI
Currently none. Formerly: 2010 VW Jetta TDI 6M, 1993 Dodge Ram W250 Cummins 5M 4WD, 1990 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1986 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1980 VW Uabbit Diesel 4M. Currently driving 2018 Toyota 4Runner SR5 4WD.
And holy crap, only $6,500? When I sold my 2010 Jetta back to VW barely 18 months ago, the Blue Book value at that time was about $12,000, and that was before the mandatory $5,500 incentive was applied, so I walked away with almost $18k. My Jetta had 59k miles on the clock when I turned it in, so the buyback amount was inflated by a couple hundred dollars for the lower-than-normal mileage, but still, the car lost almost 50% of its value in only 18 months. When I saw how much you paid for the car, I thought you got once-in-lifetime break, but I was curious about that, so I checked the Blue Book value, and, sure enough, you paid about what the car is worth. Mind boggling. I am now considering a trip to my local VW dealer and asking whether my old Jetta is still awaiting the fix, and, if so, what it would take to buy it back.
 

Froginluv

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2016
Location
Chicago
TDI
2010 Jetta TDI manual, 2005 Golf GLS TDI, previous 2002 Jetta TDI auto
And holy crap, only $6,500? When I sold my 2010 Jetta back to VW barely 18 months ago, the Blue Book value at that time was about $12,000, and that was before the mandatory $5,500 incentive was applied, so I walked away with almost $18k. My Jetta had 59k miles on the clock when I turned it in, so the buyback amount was inflated by a couple hundred dollars for the lower-than-normal mileage, but still, the car lost almost 50% of its value in only 18 months. When I saw how much you paid for the car, I thought you got once-in-lifetime break, but I was curious about that, so I checked the Blue Book value, and, sure enough, you paid about what the car is worth. Mind boggling. I am now considering a trip to my local VW dealer and asking whether my old Jetta is still awaiting the fix, and, if so, what it would take to buy it back.
Definitely DO it! Will be extremely sad that all these great '09-'10 Jetta TDI won't get fixed but instead crushed. Also hate to be orphans on the road :D
 

soot1

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Location
Houston, TX
TDI
Currently none. Formerly: 2010 VW Jetta TDI 6M, 1993 Dodge Ram W250 Cummins 5M 4WD, 1990 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1986 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1980 VW Uabbit Diesel 4M. Currently driving 2018 Toyota 4Runner SR5 4WD.
Also, I know that most owners of '09 and '10 Jetta TDI sold them back to VW, but anyone had Malone tuning on their car? I am thinking of going Stage 2 but unsure since the car has the emission fix done in 10/2017 or 11k miles ago so don't want to void the Extended Emission Warranty.
Any thought :confused:
The extended emissions warranty is worthless piece of toilet paper. Just ask those unfortunate souls who have it, yet cannot drive their TDIs due to the simple fact that their DPF filter cracked, and the new ones have 4-6 months wait time. And, to add insult to injury, a few short months after getting their new, long-awaited DPF, the new one cracks and they are back to square 1. What good is such "warranty"? You might be better off just going straight for the delete/tune and never have to worry about cracked DPF and warranty on parts that are no longer there. That would be my approach.
 

soot1

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Location
Houston, TX
TDI
Currently none. Formerly: 2010 VW Jetta TDI 6M, 1993 Dodge Ram W250 Cummins 5M 4WD, 1990 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1986 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1980 VW Uabbit Diesel 4M. Currently driving 2018 Toyota 4Runner SR5 4WD.
Oh, I forgot - my lifetime calculated average was about 46 MPG, with 50/50 city/highway mix. In pure city traffic, it dropped to about 42, but on highway, it quickly cracked the 50 barrier, and on trips >50 miles, it wasn't unusual to get 60 MPG, especially in hot weather. I am, however, a very light-footed driver.
 

jetlagmech

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Location
Toledo, WA
TDI
2010 jetta
My lifetime fuelly average is 42.5 over the tracked 170,000+ miles. on hiway trips is easy to break 50 mpg when not using winter fuel. My 2010 does not have the emissions update, no tune.
 
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