standard guys... do you leave it in 1st when parked? or neutral + ebrake?

supton

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This is something that oilhammer has mentioned in regards to automatic transmissions, and I think it may be the same here.

On an automatic, he said to come to a stop and hold the car with the foot brake. Put the transmission in Park, then - while still holding the foot brake - set the park brake. This puts the holding power on the brakes rather than the parking pawl in the transmission.

So, to equate that to manual transmissions: stop and hold with the foot brake, put it in gear, set the brake, release the foot brake. This puts the load on the brake again.

Maybe I'm wrong, maybe it doesn't matter. It probably won't change anyones habits. I know that he is right about doing that on the automatics, but I still almost never use the park brake unless I realize I am going to be putting a big load on the parking pawl. And that realization comes when I go to move it again and it's difficult to move the lever out of park because so much weight is on the parking pawl.
I think you want to shift to neutral, set brake, let it roll, then when it stops, engage park. Seems my Toyotas have crappy parking brakes--stick or auto, with the brake engaged, if I pull a rear wheel I tan turn the rotor a bit before the brakes does its bit. Huge slop.
 

Chris

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I am now in the habit of always using the e-brake and reverse or 1st because a few years ago I parked in front of a little store in Mexico. When I came out, my truck was gone, I thought somebody stole it. I found it about 300 feet down a completely non-discernible hill, where it must have traveled veeeery slowly. With a lot of luck. it didn't hit anyone or anything. Another reason is that the Cadillac calipers in my truck are adjusted by the use of the e-brake...Mark
...though to be sure, the only function of the calipers that needs to self-adjust is the e-brake. And I suspect it's adjusted by use of the service brakes, not the e-brake.

That being said, it's good to use the e-brake and transmission in gear (suspenders and a belt).
 

maybe368

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...though to be sure, the only function of the calipers that needs to self-adjust is the e-brake. And I suspect it's adjusted by use of the service brakes, not the e-brake.

That being said, it's good to use the e-brake and transmission in gear (suspenders and a belt).

That is what I thought, but that is not what EGR, the kit manufacturer says. They are 76 to 78 Cadillac El Dorado calipers and are different from others. When the E brake starts getting weak, the pedal also drops. I talked to the tech department when my brake pedal began to drop and that is what I was told. Who knows what the actual truth is...Mark
 

kjclow

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This is something that oilhammer has mentioned in regards to automatic transmissions, and I think it may be the same here.

On an automatic, he said to come to a stop and hold the car with the foot brake. Put the transmission in Park, then - while still holding the foot brake - set the park brake. This puts the holding power on the brakes rather than the parking pawl in the transmission.

So, to equate that to manual transmissions: stop and hold with the foot brake, put it in gear, set the brake, release the foot brake. This puts the load on the brake again.

Maybe I'm wrong, maybe it doesn't matter. It probably won't change anyones habits. I know that he is right about doing that on the automatics, but I still almost never use the park brake unless I realize I am going to be putting a big load on the parking pawl. And that realization comes when I go to move it again and it's difficult to move the lever out of park because so much weight is on the parking pawl.
I've always heard the opposite procedure, especially for the dsg. Pull to a stop, engage parking brake, let off of brakes, push brake pedal back in and shift to park. You have to push the brake pedal back in or it won't shift. This is supposed to release the pressure off the tranny onto the parking brake.

As for the OP, in my manuals, I always leave it in gear, typically first, and set the parking brake. Turn the wheels so that if it rolls, the car will roll to the curb or yard and not into the street. So facing down hill, turn the wheels in. If facing up hill, turn the wheels out, if there is a curb. If no curb or minor curb, like in my neighborhood, turn the wheels in.
 

maybe368

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...though to be sure, the only function of the calipers that needs to self-adjust is the e-brake. And I suspect it's adjusted by use of the service brakes, not the e-brake.
I did some checking and those calipers are "hydro-mechanical" types and are completely different than most others because the e-brake is integral.. When that E brake is out of adjustment the caliper piston is also out of adjustment. The e-brake and caliper pistons are both adjusted by use of the e-brake and when they can no longer be adjusted that way, then the lever arm has to be re-indexed. I say that that is probably the time for new pucks...Mark
 
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turbobrick240

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That is what I thought, but that is not what EGR, the kit manufacturer says. They are 76 to 78 Cadillac El Dorado calipers and are different from others. When the E brake starts getting weak, the pedal also drops. I talked to the tech department when my brake pedal began to drop and that is what I was told. Who knows what the actual truth is...Mark
I don't think our cars share much in common with a 40 year old Cadillac. Other than both are front drive.:)
 

Sumfuncomet

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Always E brake and a higher gear, never in first. I parked a Beetle in the late 70s on a hill in first with no E brake. It moved downed the hill kind of slow motion with the engine turning over but not starting....low compression. If you never use the E brake or "parking brake" as it should be referred to they will become useless through not being used.
 

mjhandy

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2nd of not 3rd and always with the parking break.

I'm not in a stick anymore but I still use the parking break all the time.
 

Chris

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Jan 27, 2000
Location
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, USA
Always E brake and a higher gear, never in first. I parked a Beetle in the late 70s on a hill in first with no E brake. It moved downed the hill kind of slow motion with the engine turning over but not starting....low compression. If you never use the E brake or "parking brake" as it should be referred to they will become useless through not being used.
Why a higher gear? Kinda negates the whole "in gear" thing.
 

vanbcguy

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I used to be a "neutral with parking brake only" kind of guy but I've recently been parking on a steep driveway every night. Get the odd "creak" from the parking brake when I say get out of the car, that's had me add putting the trans in gear too just in case. If my car were to roll there'd be about a 50/50 chance that it would roll directly in to the side of another car.
 

jason_

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hmm interesting post so far guys.. looks like ill have to change my ways.
This is my first vehicle with a functioning parking brake. Past 30 years always left in gear or turned into a curb.

But I tug it enough on flat ground to keep from rolling. Some people PULL that mother f'er for dear life. I avoid unnecessary tightness unless it's critically needed. I'd rather leave it in gear then chase down stretched cables.

And 1st or reverse. Higher the gear the easier it is to turn the engine.
 

whitedog

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At five MPH, my parking brake will lock the tires. I'm confident that it will hold. If the cable breaks and crashes into another car well, that's what insurance is for. Park more, worry less. :)
 

The J

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I always leave it in gear with no e-brake. Most of my parking is on flat ground.

If I'm parking on a hill, it's in gear, tires turned into the curb, and e-brake as fail safe.
 

copakabata

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In my experience it's the people who never use their parking brake who are at greatest risk of having it stick on in the rare occasion that they need it.


[Edit: And I *always* apply the brake and leave it in gear]
I agree 100%. And it always seems to stick ON. :D

As for the gear:

Always in gear. Doesn't hurt to have the extra assurance it won't roll. As for getting hit and doing damage to power train, the chances are almost nil.

If on an incline, always in the uphill gear.

If on the flat, in the gear I would prefer it to roll (if it did), using common sense. (I.e. "I'm in a parking lot, do I want it to roll forward 3 feet and bump the curb, or roll backward 50 feet and hit the Cadillac?")


As for the brake:

Always applied unless the temperature is going to go below freezing AND moisture may be on the cables (rain, snow, puddles, etc.)

Below freezing and no moisture, I've had no issues.
 

VeeDubTDI

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Why a higher gear? Kinda negates the whole "in gear" thing.
I was wondering the same thing. :confused:

It is easier for the engine to turn in a higher gear than it is in a lower gear, increasing your chances of a roll-away.
 

[486]

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I used to use 3rd gear to roll start my car on a hill* (less driveline shock and tire chirpage).
*Not a diesel car
I push start mine every day in reverse on my driveway.

in the winter it doesn't kick over in the three tries the driveway length allows, so I just crank it. So I should say "whenever it's warm out...".
 
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