rocketeer928 - My 2003 VW Jetta TDI

n8ronJ

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2007
Location
Niagara Frontier - Somerset, NY
TDI
2014 BMW 328d XDrive, 2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5speed Platinum Grey (sold), 2010 Jetta 6speed (bought back)
rocketeer - Upgrade those nozzles! Then you can sell the used PP520's to me. :) I'm sure they wouldn't know the difference since I have a Platinum Gray '03 too.!
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
Don't swap the pump, just the nozzles. PP764s or 502s would give it a nice bump, when you're ready for a clutch.
 

rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
IndigoBlueWagon said:
Don't swap the pump, just the nozzles. PP764s or 502s would give it a nice bump, when you're ready for a clutch.
I was wondering which nozzles would be the next step, so I'm glad you posted them for me. For future reference, would the PP764 or PP502 nozzles and a Stage 3 clutch support the RC5 RocketChip?

Took my car out for a couple of Italian tune-ups this evening on a fairly safe (from cops), long on-ramp where I live. Not sure, but I thought I might have felt my Valeo clutch slip a little. I'm really curious what torque I'm getting with my current set-up, and horsepower too. I don't want to wish the summer away, but NE Dyno Day can't get here soon enough.
 
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IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
I think I'd go for 764s in the current environment. What I mean by that is the 502s seemed to have, in the past, flowed more fuel than the 764s. Now that doesn't seem to be the case. As always I'd ask Jeff but my .02 is that the 764s are the way to go with a 10mm pump and your setup. I think it would kick some butt.
 

Rollingcircle

New member
Joined
Jul 10, 2009
Location
CT
TDI
Jetta GLS
Hey Rocketeer928,
Where did you get the braided oil line from? I need a new one.
Thanks
Jim

rocketeer928 said:
Removed the oil line connection union from the top of the 17/22 turbo to replace it with the braided oil line connection union.



The original union has a copper washer, while the union for the braided line has an O-ring and aluminum washer.

A little dab of grease was used to keep the aluminum washer onto the connection union as I installed it on top of the 17/22 turbo with a 14-mm socket to 40 Nm (30 ft‑lb).




The original OEM turbo oil supply line banjo bolt was replaced with the braided oil line connection union, including a washer and O-ring. The transmission was in the way to use my torque wrench, so I tightened with a 17-mm socket with a 3/8‑inch ratchet until as tight as possible.



Reinstalled the rear clamp mounting bracket for the braided turbo oil supply line with 13-mm socket to 25 Nm (18 ft-lb). Placed the upper clamp on the oil line. Fed the braided oil line to the top of the 17/22 turbo and hand threaded, which was difficult. Fed the braided oil line to the lower oil connection union and hand threaded. Removed the vacuum reservoir with an 8-mm wrench. Tightened the upper and lower unions with a 15-mm wrench. Reinstalled the upper and lower securing clamps on the braided oil line with a 10-mm socket to 10 Nm (7 ft-lb), and reinstalled the vacuum reservoir.





 

rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
Re-plumbing of the Upper Intercooler Pipe

Here’s the way I originally plumbed the upper intercooler pipe.





Unfortunately, the upper intercooler pipe sits too low and rubs against the top of the serpentine belt tensioner. The top of the tensioner started to get worn, even with a rubber cap placed upon it.





Peter (IBW) at ID Parts sent to me a straight reducer hose to re-plumb the intercooler pipe.



Using the 3-inch metal tube that came with the upper intercooler pipe, I placed the straight reducer pipe on top of the 45-degree hose coming from the EuroJet intercooler. The 45-degree hose was positioned further toward the back of the engine bay.



This allowed the upper intercooler pipe to be placed on the straight reducer hose, which allowed it to be above the tensioner without touching and moved back.



With a little stretching, the elbow hose was clamped between the upper intercooler pipe and the DG race pipe.



The clamp groove on the DG race pipe is less than ¾-inch, so the t-bolt clamp would not fit well. Therefore, I ground both sides of the t-bolt clamp, so that it would fit. I think the t-bolt clamps look better than the common screw clamps.



Hopefully, all the clamps will hold.
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tothemax

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Location
West Coast
TDI
03 Jetta, 03 Golf, 2016 Q5
rocketeer928 said:


I’m still finding that the exhaust tip touches a metal piece hanging from the rear bumper, which can be seen in the above picture. However, it’s still much better than when I initially did the installation.

SWEET RIDE!!! rocketeer

I love your thread and your car... reading this is like going down memory lane for me as... not only do we have the same car but you also seem to be doing many of the same mods I did or plan to be doing ... so...

Here's a bit of comparing notes....

I also got the lower IC piping and also the PD150 TIP from Peter but I cannot find the time to install it... I think I will at the upcoming Portland GTG in August.. Was it pretty easy to install? I am only doing the lower IC.. I am not doing the upper for now.


At least I installed my new Euro rubs last week..

I am considering the same taillights as you as well as the smoked Hella... I am concerned about the smoked thought, because someone told me that if I get rear ended w/ smoked taillights I can be found at fault because they are not street legal. The taillighs and smoked side marker lights are my next mods for sure.


I looked at your tip situation and I came across the same question when I did my straight exhaust... I want to offer you a tip... no pun intended

Take a look at the

Hedman 17205 Hot Tips Stainless Steel Exhaust Tip








I installed this tip and it looks very OEM kind like the VR6

I did not spring for the valence, but just dremeled out the TDI valence.. It should look even better on your valence.



Here's where I bought the tip

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000CO7JFS/ref=asc_df_B000CO7JFS826814?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=nextag-auto-delta-20&linkCode=asn

A number of us here installed this tip and it looks great..







Here's mine:







 
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rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
Nice ride. I recognize you from the robo-TDI-whatever-it-is in your signature line.

Installing the lower IC pipe wasn't too bad, though I little challenging in getting the hoses to sit right, especially on the 17/22 turbo side. I ended up doing the installation twice. First, onto the stock IC and then onto the EuroJet SMIC. I had to shell out some unexpected $$$ to buy 2.5-inch radiator hose to get the lower IC pipe to mate up with the EuroJet, but in the end it worked out fine.
Thanks for the tip on the exhaust tip. I may consider this as a future mod. A couple of questions. Did you or someone else weld that tip onto your tailpipe? Since it's not bent downward, but rather goes out straight, do you get a lot of soot build-up on the back of your Jetta? I wouldn't want that.
 
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tothemax

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Location
West Coast
TDI
03 Jetta, 03 Golf, 2016 Q5
rocketeer928 said:
Nice ride. I recognize you from the robo-TDI-whatever-it-is in your signature line.

Installing the lower IC pipe wasn't too bad, though I little challenging in getting the hoses to sit right, especially on the 17/22 turbo side. I ended up doing the installation twice. First, onto the stock IC and then onto the EuroJet SMIC. I had to shell out some unexpected $$$ to buy 2.5-inch radiator hose to get the lower IC pipe to mate up with the EuroJet, but in the end it worked out fine.

Thanks for the tip on the exhaust tip. I may consider this as a future mod. A couple of questions. Did you or someone else weld that tip onto your tailpipe? Since it's not bent downward, but rather goes out straight, do you get a lot of soot build-up on the back of your Jetta? I wouldn't want that.
Tnx for the info on the IC piping.

I got the guy a the muffler shop to weld it.

Unfortunately it does blow soot on the rear.... but it does not show too much w/ the gray color, I guess it's the compromise I have to make to have this kind of tip.

P
 
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tothemax

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Location
West Coast
TDI
03 Jetta, 03 Golf, 2016 Q5
With all you mods, you might think about RC5.

Also, does the sound insulation on top of the skid plate cut a lot of the cabin noise out? mine is nosier than $hit.

P




rocketeer928 said:
Then I will not be getting this tip. I'm happy with what I have.
 
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Greaseburger

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2005
Location
Swanzey,NH
TDI
99.5 Jetta,2011 Tdi sportwgon
rocketeer928 Where did you get your headlights? I want something different for mine and can't decide:)
 

rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
tothemax said:
With all you mods, you might think about RC5. Also, does the sound insulation on top of the skid plate cut a lot of the cabin noise out? mine is nosier than ...
If I decide to go with the 11-mm IP and PP764s then I'll consider the RC5. Yes, the second skin sound barrier does seem to help with cabin noise. I also put some underneath the felt of the hood.
Greaseburger said:
rocketeer928 Where did you get your headlights? I want something different for mine and can't decide:)
Actually, I got them off eBay last year from someone in Asia. They are Depo. I don't use the angel eye functionality; removed those bulbs. I like the "not typical" Jetta look they give my car.
 
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rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
Rear Sway (Stabilizer) Bar

I decided to install the rear sway (stabilizer) bar from ID Parts to help reduce under-steer and improve turn-in. (Edit: This rear sway bar from ID Parts is no longer available) The rear sway bar is powder-coated in blue, which happens to match my painted brake calipers. Doesn’t really matter, since hardly anyone will actually see it except when the car is lifted.



Here’s where the rear sway bar is going to be located, which sort of hides it underneath the car.



First, I marked the center of both the rear sway bar and the metal swing arm underneath the car where it will be located. You can see the yellow crayon mark for the center point on the swing arm of the car.



Using C-clamps and duct tape, I secured the rear sway bar to the swing arm to drill the lower holes, lining up the two marked center points. I actually had to relocate the C-clamps to hold better, which will be seen in a subsequent picture. Drilled with a 3/8-inch drill bit and electric drill.



After drilling each hole, I would brush away as much metal shavings as possible. I did a thorough brushing of everything before the final installation. I didn’t use compressed air because I was afraid that I might get a metal shaving in one of my eyes.

After drilling each lower hole, I installed and temporarily tightened down the bolts, so that I could accurately drill out the second holes on each side. You can see where I had to relocate the C-clamps for better holding. Once the first two holes were drilled (one on each side) and the bolts were tightened in place, I cold remove the C-clamps to drill out the next two bottom holes.



Here’s a picture of the two bottom holes drilled out on the driver’s side.



Next, by using a bolt on each side and four C-clamps, I positioned the rear sway bar in its final location in order to drill out the four upper holes. At first, I tried the duct tape approach, but that wasn’t working as well as the four C-clamps.



Once an upper hole was drilled on each side, the bolts were temporarily secured so that the other two upper holes could be drilled, and to make sure everything lined up correctly.



After all eight holes were drilled, I cleaned up the metal shavings on the rear sway bar and swing arm. Using the rear sway bar as a template cause the paint within the four holes to be stripped during drilling. Therefore, I sprayed all the exposed metal surfaces on the rear sway bar and swing arm with rubberized undercoat to help resist rusting.

Using eight stainless steel washers, the rear sway bar was installed with a 9/16-inch wrench and socket until good and tight.



Lesson learned: I struggled through drilling six of the eight holes with two combination metal, wood, and plastic bits and a cobalt metal-only bit. The drilling took a lot of time, strength, and sweaty frustration. For the last two holes, I used a DeWalt (DW1390) 3/8-inch Pilot Point Titanium Combination Drill Bit with a patented small tip design. The difference between this bit and the other bits was night and day. The last two holes were drilled with relatively little effort and time compared to the other bits. The little pilot tip on the DeWalt was all the difference, and I wish I had known it was going to work so well before I had started.

After installing the rear sway bar, I had about a 70 mile back-and-forth trip to check out how it worked. When I pulled out of my driveway, which has about a 1-inch lip on the end onto the road, I heard a loud creaking noise. It was as if the rear sway bar was adjusting itself within the swing arm. It clanked and creaked a few times going over bumps in the road. However, I could definitely feel the car handling better and not rolling as much around the highway ramps and cornering.

The next day, I went back under the car to tighten up those bolts once more. My hope is that the creaking is not a permanent feature of installing this rear sway bar.
 
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tothemax

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Location
West Coast
TDI
03 Jetta, 03 Golf, 2016 Q5
rocketeer928 said:
I decided to install the rear sway (stabilizer) bar from TDI Parts to help reduce under-steer and improve turn-in.

........

The next day, I went back under the car to tighten up those bolts once more. My hope is that the creaking is not a permanent feature of installing this rear sway bar.
Pls keep us updated. I have been thinking about getting one of those but I certainly would not do too good with the creaking ... I cannot stand creaks and funny noises in my car.
 

VW97JettaTDI

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2008
Location
Wisconsin
TDI
VW97JettaTDI
Nice thread!

Just ordered the VNT-17/22 and it on the way i hope :) Im so excited i think i peed my pants! :D
 
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rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
Update on Rear Sway (Stabilizer) Bar

I tightened the four bolts of the rear sway bar a bit more. When I drive normally over the bumps in the road there are no creaking sounds. When I slowly go over the ~1-inch lip at the end of my driveway or make a hard left or right turn from a stop, I do still hear the creaking. This morning I exited the highway, didn't slow down much while going around a curve on the exit ramp, and the rear sway bar creaked again loudly.

Hmm... I'm starting to think that the rear sway bar might be sliding on the stainless steel washers that I decided to use. I think I'll try to remove those washers, re-tighten, and try again to see if there is a difference.

Besides the occasional creaking, the rear sway bar does improve the handling of my Jetta.

Update on 16 Aug 2009: I removed the washers I had used, and now the creaking and clunking is pretty much gone. Das ist gut!

I learned from IBW that I'm only one of a few that has the ID Parts rear sway bar. I think Shine gave them a hard time or something, and they may have stopped selling them.
 
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rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
Upper Braided Line for the Dieselgeek By-pass Filter System

NOTE: Due to an issue that I experienced and years of frustration, I no longer use the Dieselgeek by-pass filter system on my TDI. See Post #885 for details.


I recently read that the Dieselgeek by-pass filter system was upgraded with a stainless steel braided oil outlet hose to replace the Kynar tubing and fittings (
http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=252924), and I decided that this was something I wanted to do. First, in the past I had some leaking issues with the Kynar tubing set-up, which was rectified by DG. However, I’ve always been a bit leery that a leak would occur again or the Kynar tubing might someday decide to pop out while on the road. Second, since the by-pass system’s inlet hose and the turbo oil line I got from KermaTDI are both braided, I felt having the by-pass system outlet hose also braided would complete “the look”. I contacted DG and bought the stainless steel braided oil outlet hose and its fittings to connect to my current aluminum by-pass filter base and valve cover.

Here is my original DG by-pass filter system with the Kynar outlet tubing to the valve cover.



Removed the Kynar tubing and the fitting on the valve cover with a 12-mm wrench.



Covered the threads of the braided oil outlet hose fitting for the valve cover with Teflon tape, and installed with an 11‑mm and a 12-mm wrench.



Removed the braided oil inlet hose from the aluminum by-pass filter base with a 14-mm wrench.



Removed the aluminum by-pass filter base from the engine bay with a 6-mm Allen socket with the Amsoil by-pass filter still attached.



Carefully removed the Amsoil by-pass filter from the aluminum by-pass filter base, and removed the filter base’s outlet fitting with a 12-mm wrench. Using an M10 × 1.0 tapered tap, re-threaded the outlet hole of the aluminum by-pass filter base for the braided oil outlet hose banjo bolt.



Sprayed copious amounts of brake cleaner through both sides of the outlet hole to remove the metal shavings from the re‑threading. I had to also carefully use a pick to dislodge some of the more stubborn shavings

Reinstalled the Amsoil by-pass filter; first coating the filter gasket with fresh oil.

Placed the aluminum by-pass filter base loosely over the stock oil filter housing and tightened the braided oil inlet hose with a 14-mm wrench. Loosely installed the braided oil outlet hose onto the valve cover fitting.



Using separate copper washers on both sides of the braided oil outlet hose fitting, installed the banjo bolt onto the aluminum by-pass filter base first by hand and then with a 12-mm socket until snug. Tightened the aluminum by-pass filter base with a 6-mm Allen socket.

Before tightening the valve cover fitting, I wanted to test the oil flow through the braided oil outlet hose. So, I removed the fitting, put it in a container, and had my wife start the car.

LEAK!!!

The braided oil outlet hose fitting with the banjo bolt on top of the aluminum by-pass filter base leaked horribly. I tried tightening more, but it still leaked. I discovered that I started stripping the new threads on the aluminum by-pass filter base and that the lower copper washer would not make an adequate seal. When I had the leaking problem with the original Kynar tubing a few months ago, I had gouged the aluminum by-pass filter base with a wrench when tightening the tubing’s outlet fitting. It looked to me that the gouges prevent a good seal with the copper washer. As I will explain below, I think my problem wasn’t only the gouges in my aluminum by-pass filter base, but also an orientation problem with the new braided oil outlet hose fitting.



I contacted Dieselgeek and purchased their newer-style “double-clamp” aluminum by-pass filter base and by-pass filter cap. Dieselgeek was very reasonable in the price they charged me, with the stipulation that I return to them the above gouged base, which I happily did. Perhaps they will melt it down to create and sell a new aluminum by-pass filter base.
 
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rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
Continued - Upper Braided Line for the Dieselgeek By-pass Filter System

NOTE: Due to an issue that I experienced and years of frustration, I no longer use the Dieselgeek by-pass filter system on my TDI. See Post #885 for details.

Here are the new parts.



Installed the aluminum by-pass filter cap onto the Amsoil by-pass filter, again coating the filter gasket with fresh oil.



Placed the “double-clamp” aluminum by-pass filter base over the stock oil filter housing and tightened just a little with a 6‑mm Allen socket just to keep it positioned. Installed the Amsoil by-pass filter with its aluminum by-pass filter cap onto the base with a 6-mm Allen socket, so that the braided oil inlet hose fitting faced the inlet hose.



Hand threaded the braided oil inlet hose onto its fitting, and then tightened snugly with a 14-mm wrench.

Placed a copper washer over the banjo bolt, which was then inserted through the hole of the braided oil outlet hose fitting, followed by the other copper washer. Loosely hand threaded the banjo bolt onto the aluminum by-pass filter cap. Loosely hand threaded the braided oil outlet hose onto the valve cover fitting. Tightened the banjo bolt with a 12-mm socket, tightened both “double-clamp” aluminum by-pass filter base with a 6-mm Allen socket, and tightened the braided oil outlet hose onto the valve cover fitting with a 14-mm wrench while holding the fitting with a 12-mm wrench.

Again, had my wife start the car.

LEAK!!!

The banjo bolt fitting on top of the aluminum by-pass filter cap leaked like a sieve. Gushing! After cleaning up the leaking oil, I tried tightening the banjo bolt more, but soon realized that the banjo bolt was twisting on itself at its upper hole. Then my wife noticed that the fitting looked crooked, and upon looking at it closely it was indeed crooked. There was no way for a seal. I took the fitting apart and noticed that once side of the braided oil outlet hose fitting had a lip on it, which is of course the side I was trying to unsuccessfully seal to the aluminum by-pass filter cap. The other side of the fitting was flat! So, I had mistakenly tried to install the banjo bolt fitting upside-down with this lip protruding. Though I take responsibility for not looking closely enough at the fitting to see that it can only be installed ONE WAY (flat side down), it would have been ideal if Dieselgeek had warned me about this. Live and learn...

Though blurry because my old camera doesn’t do well with close-up shots, here’s a picture of the braided oil outlet hose fitting with the banjo bolt in the wrong direction (protruding lip downward).



And, here is a picture of the correct orientation (protruding lip upward).



For those of you buying a new Dieselgeek by-pass filter system or upgrading the current Kynar tubing set-up, be aware of this detail. You will save yourself from frustration, and in my case, downright anger. I was ticked off!

I went to one of our local auto supply stores and bought their last two copper washers of the same dimensions (BTW, The Home Depot and Lowe’s do not carry copper washers – found out the hard way). Using the banjo bolt that was sent to me when I first purchased the braided oil outlet hose (good thing I had two), I tightened everything up again. This time, the braided oil inlet hose fitting looked flush and flat, and I tightened it to 25 Nm (18 ft-lb) with a 12-mm socket.



Again, had my wife start the car.

SUCCESS!!!

No leaks. I kept a careful eye on the system for a couple of days, and still no leaks. And, it looks a whole lot better than the Kynar tubing.

 
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rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
Emissions Test

I had my 2-year Connecticut emissions yesterday, and I passed with no problems. I had been told by a fellow Connecticut TDI Club member that the emissions tester will look for the EGR valve. So, I dutifully took off my DG race pipe and reinstalled the EGR, but without the EGR cooler. The guy who tested my car didn't even pop the hood! Oh well, better safe than sorry.

As soon as I got home, I reinstalled the race pipe and my boost/EGT gauge. Back to that fimiliar shudder upon turning the car off. Nice!
 
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rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
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UberWagen

Active member
Joined
Jul 30, 2009
Location
Riverside, CA
TDI
09 JSW White, DSG, Pano Roof, 17" Goal Sport
Dammit Rocketeer, you're making me want to get a project Jetta. Can't really do much to the wife's JSW. She doesn't understand the need to improve an already good product. I should just get a MkIV Jetta and start a buildup.
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
Rocketeer, keep me posted on the sway bar and creaking. It shouldn't make any noise, and if yours persists I wonder if it's a bit too small for the axle. Did if fit tighly when you put it in place?

I want one of those tractors, too. I mow my acre of lawn with a 21" Honda mower, propelled by me. I figure I need the exercise, but it's time consuming.
 

jsrmonster

Veteran Member - TDIClub Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 22, 2002
Location
Red Lion, PA
TDI
15 Golf SW DSG, RC3 piped, 99.5 Jetta Rocket PD150 6spd 4motion, 2000 ASV110 RC6 "Silverbullet" 5spd Race Car, 2003.5 Cummins QCLB 4x4 "Blue Monster" Jeep CRD juiced, MB Sprinter van juiced up
2 of the finest TDI's I've had the pleasure to work on from coast-2-coast

lots of attention to detail, and wicked fast too!

Good job guys!

Jeff ;-)
 

rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
jsrmonster said:
2 of the finest TDI's I've had the pleasure to work on from coast-2-coast
lots of attention to detail, and wicked fast too!
Good job guys!
Jeff ;-)
Thanks a bunch, Jeff. Means a lot to read that! The Jetta's still doing great with the RC4, except my clutch slips a little. That's going to be fixed soon with a DC Stage III+.

I'm assuming that the other TDI that you're referring to is the IBW. That's a really sweet car too. Wish I had one myself. I would also really like a clean, low mileage (relative to diesels) MKIII Jetta TDI too.

No $$$ or space for that right now, not to mention that my wife likely would not approve.
 
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rocketeer928

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Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
Please watch the language on this thread

Note to my fellow TDI friends: Please watch the salty language on this particular thread. I've got family that sometimes looks at the postings. Thanks!
 
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rocketeer928

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Location
Northeastern Illinois
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS TDI 5-speed
UberWagen said:
Rocketeer, you're making me want to get a project Jetta. Can't really do much to the wife's JSW. She doesn't understand the need to improve an already good product. I should just get a MkIV Jetta and start a buildup.
Well, go get one already! From your signature, it looks like you enjoy having a few different vehicles.

BTW, I have a 2003 Tacoma too; black. It's good to have while the Jetta is in my garage while I am working on it over several days.
 
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