Pilot bearing seized onto input shaft

1sloVR4

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
Location
TN
TDI
2006 Jetta TDI
Trying to pull the transmission but the pilot bearing is seized onto the input shaft. The transmission won't budge at all. Anyone have any tricks or tips for breaking loose the pilot bearing
 

1sloVR4

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
Location
TN
TDI
2006 Jetta TDI
A pry bar will fit in between the engine and transmission but the transmission won't move past the dowel pins (yes, it's free from the pins). I blasted nearly a can of PB blaster in the bellhousing from the 1/2" gap around the case. I'm not too optimistic but hopefully some of penetrating oil made its way to the pilot bearing.

Here's what I'm dealing with:



 

1sloVR4

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
Location
TN
TDI
2006 Jetta TDI
Finally got it popped off after some major prying. I wedged a large chisel in between the engine and transmission just above the oil pan (towards radiator) and then used two 2-foot pry bars on the top side to eventually break it loose.

Here's the culprit:





New pilot bearing for comparison:

 

mextdi

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2013
Location
San Antonio, TX
TDI
2006 Jetta TDI 1.9, 2012 Passat TDI SE DSG, Previous 2014 Beetle TDi, 2012 Golf TDi DSG
I had a hell of a time getting my pilot bearing out in one piece. It got torn to shreds using the tool I borrowed from Advance. There is a three jaw pilot bearing puller at HF you can get for about $20. That is what got mine out after a few tries.

Good luck!
 

oilhammer

Certified Volkswagen Nut & Vendor
Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Location
outside St Louis (where it's safe)
TDI
There are just too many to list....
I had to take the crankshaft out of one of those once, so I could upend it in a fixture at the machine shop and have them drill it out oversize, MAKE a sleeve from stainless and press it in, then press the new bearing in. It had chewed up the crank so bad. Lots of work, but saved them an $1100 crankshaft.

This is what happens when the DMF is allowed to remain "bad" for too long.
 

1sloVR4

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
Location
TN
TDI
2006 Jetta TDI
I had a hell of a time getting my pilot bearing out in one piece. It got torn to shreds using the tool I borrowed from Advance. There is a three jaw pilot bearing puller at HF you can get for about $20. That is what got mine out after a few tries.
Good luck!
The outer race was all the was left inside the crank and my puller couldn't get a good grip on it either. I ended up taking a deburring bit to it and then chiseled it out.
I had to take the crankshaft out of one of those once, so I could upend it in a fixture at the machine shop and have them drill it out oversize, MAKE a sleeve from stainless and press it in, then press the new bearing in. It had chewed up the crank so bad. Lots of work, but saved them an $1100 crankshaft.
This is what happens when the DMF is allowed to remain "bad" for too long.
Oh boy. That's a lot of work. Thankfully my crank and input shaft were not damaged. Comparing the old and new flywheel side by side, the old one had the same amount of play as the new one but it had significantly more wear on the splines. This was probably the cause of the intermittent metallic grinding/rattling noise I was hearing during cruise and acceleration. No noise at idle.
 

crazyrunner33

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2006
Location
Charlotte, NC
TDI
'10 Golf(bought back)
For future reference, one trick for removing the pilot bearing if the outer race is still in one piece, use a nut with a matching bolt and allen wrench. You get the nut behind the race, use the tightest allen that'll fit and tighten the bolt. With any luck, it'll pull the race right out.
 

soot1

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Location
Houston, TX
TDI
Currently none. Formerly: 2010 VW Jetta TDI 6M, 1993 Dodge Ram W250 Cummins 5M 4WD, 1990 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1986 VW Jetta Diesel 5M, 1980 VW Uabbit Diesel 4M. Currently driving 2018 Toyota 4Runner SR5 4WD.
Just a quick question for the audience here - does anybody know if a sintered bronze bearing is available for this particular application instead of the needle-roller? The reason I am asking is that years ago, I was replacing a throw-out bearing on my 1993 Ram, and for good measure, I decided to replace the whole clutch since I was already there, plus the truck had 150k on the clock. The OEM Sachs clutch kit came with a bronze bushing for the pilot bearing, but I read somewhere that a needle-roller was also available. So, I stopped by my local Advance Auto store and they did show on their parts diagram that the pilot bearing was a needle-roller, so I bought that one, too. Then, when I brought the truck and the clutch kit to the shop that did the work, the mechanic checked that the kit was complete before commencing work, and he was surprised to find both the roller and the bushing in the box. I then explained to him I bought the roller separately in case that was the right part. He laughed and told me Sachs put the correct part in the kit, and added that the sintered bronze bearing will easily make it to a 1 million mile mark, whereas the roller will have to be replaced much sooner, even with the extra oil seal, which the bushing doesn't have. Then, when he took the old clutch off, he removed the old bushing, and after he washed it in brake cleaner, it looked like new with no noticeable wear.
 
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