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Peloquin and 5th gears install, Part Two

M

mickey

Guest
Here, the three "blocks" have been removed.



Gear puller in place. I had to grind a bit of metal off one of the puller's hooks to get it to fit under the gear. You yank that entire pack of gear, rings and synchros off the shaft as a unit.



Presto! Now it gets interesting. The gear puller will not fit under that 5th gear. There is a puller specified in the Bentley manual for the purpose. It costs about $80. Then you need to buy special hooks because the ones that come with the special puller are sold separately. They're ANOTHER $80!!! I tried prying the gear with a screwdriver, but chipped one of the teeth. (That's why I decided to go ahead and install the taller 5th gear pack.)



Here's how I did it: Since I had already chipped a tooth and didn't want to invest in a pair of puller hooks I bought these two nifty Seal Pullers at a specialty tool store. Wicked looking things, eh? But I'm sure some other prying deviced could be improvised that would work even better. These hooks put a lot of pressure on one tiny point and are apt to cause chipping. (Didn't in my case, but I don't trust this method.) I've seen various chisels and nail pullers that look kind of like screwdrivers but are bent at the tip. A pair of those could be used to hook under the gear and pry it upward.

The manual says to heat the gear to about 100 degrees C. (212 F.) before trying to pull it. I just warmed it up nicely with a propane torch, which you'll see in some of these pics standing next to a can of gasoline. (Not the recommended storage solution.)



Now the shift mechanism is removed. It won't go peacefully. Use a soft mallet, or cover the end of your hammer with a folded shop towel, and beat on it a bit. Not too hard! Aluminum isn't very tolerant of shocks. There is a casting "tab" that you can use a chisel or screwdriver on to drive the shifter housing away from the tranny. Once you open up a crack you can pry the thing out of there. Not fun!



After a few other external odds and ends, and about a million bolts, are removed you can pull the case apart. It won't want to go peacefully. There are some parts of the casting that stick out, and are intended for placing a chisel against and smacking the case smartly. Eventually it'll break loose. WARNING!!! Take EXTREME care not to damage the mating surfaces of the transmission case and the clutch housing! Because of the precision fitment of the transmission parts it is not possible to put a gasket between the two castings! It relies on very precise machining to properly seal. There is an assembly paste that is specified for reassembly, which you should certainly use, but it is used VERY sparingly and will not seal the case if you damage those surfaces! Consider yourself warned.



That's it for now. Stay tuned for Part Three.

-mickey

[ April 10, 2001: Message edited by: mickey ]
 
M

mickey

Guest
All together now: "Oh Two Jay, Oh Two Jay, Oh Two Jay....!!!"



-mickey
 
S

SkyPup

Guest
OMG
This thing is going to fly! Hope you have a unlimted supply of hand soap!!!

nice work man....
 

TDI Believer

Responsible For Global Warming
Joined
Sep 20, 1999
Location
Charles Town,WV
TDI
2012 Touareg TDI
Mickey,

I have to hand it to you for taking on a task like this! Personally, I love tearing down an engine. But tranmissions? Those are way more difficult IMHO. She's going to be one sweet ride when you get her back together!

BTW: I took mine to the dealer for the Quaife and they chipped the 5th gear exactly as you did. They had to keep the car a couple of extra days waiting for replacement parts.

Keep us informed of how it all is coming together.

- Rich
 
M

mickey

Guest
Well, I've certainly learned a lot during this fiasco. And the #1 lesson I've learned is that cars aren't nearly as complicated as I thought they were. Engines are simplicity itself. The transmission contains about a zillion parts, but they're all just stacked up in a perfectly logical order. If you have a good shop manual and the right tools just dig in! It'll work out.

Fiddling with the tranny is kind of fun, actually. I've never done this kind of thing before.

The big "secret" of internal engine work is measure, measure again...and then measure some more. Measure every single dimension very carefully. Anything that is out of spec should be fixed or replaced.

Ditto for transmissions. You just use a set of feeler gauges to check clearances betwen the various gears and synchros. The gears themselve just need visual inspection. If they're chewed up, replace them.

Of course, it remains to be seen whether I'll get the thing to actually work again!

-mickey
 

JeffT

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 4, 1999
Location
Diesel is diesel is diesel!
In a prior life I wanted to be an auto mechanic and spent 6 months disassembling and reassemblying manual and automatic transmissions. The autos were easy as pie but the manuals were a lot harder, all those gears to pull. Mickey you are right about all the tolerances, they are critical in a manual tranny.
 
M

mickey

Guest
I'm still freaked out by automatics. They are a complete mystery to me. How do they know when to shift? Is there a little elf in there moving levers or something?


I know they're based around a planetary gear system. My Peloqin has planetary gears. Somehow, using nothing but gears, it shifts the torque back and forth between the wheels in such a way that the wheel with the MOST grip gets torque, rather than the wheel with the LEAST grip like a standard open diff does. That is not only freakishly weird to me, but it also begs the question: Why don't ALL cars have planetary torque-proportioning diffs? Seems pretty silly not to.

-mickey
 

JeffT

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 4, 1999
Location
Diesel is diesel is diesel!
The autos work on pressure via the valve body. As the car builts up rpms, the pressure changes, is applied to clutch disks which engage the next gear. Its pretty simple, and everything just fits together on a spline, and the valve body is the critical element.

Little ball bearings opening and closing passages as pressures change.

We worked on what is probably the simplest auto out there, the Chevy powerglide. I can still rebuild one of them in my sleep I'm sure.
 

diesel des

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 19, 1999
Location
Belfast,NI
Mickey, I chickened out and got a gear box dude to put the LSD into my box. I had to mod the Peloquin to fit as it was for a 02A box and mine is the 02J. This involved taking appart the Peloquin and fittinh nuts. Its an weird peice of equipment! Any how, box is in the car now and I am impressed at how its pulls round bends now and doesnt spin out wide. You will be impressed!
 
M

mickey

Guest
You can't see the reverse shaft in these photos. These just show the 5th gear set. Look in Part III for pics inside the case.

-mickey
 
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