Newbie Sport Wagen Question

SoCal Surf

New member
Joined
Aug 28, 2020
Location
Los Angeles
TDI
Golf Sport Wagen
Hi, I'm not a car guy, but I've fallen for the 2015 Sport Wagen TDI SEL...I took one for a test drive and now I just have to have one. Lacking the ability to fix a car, I've always just done leases, knowing I had warranty to fix any problems, but now that I'm thinking of getting a 2015 (some of which have 2 year warranties), I was wondering how high a mileage car can I get and still be fairly safe? I'm only going to get a certified pre-owned car and I know diesels run forever, but wasn't sure if I should be looking for cars under a certain number of miles.
Appreciate any advice.
Thanks.
 

nathanso

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2019
Location
Redwood City, CA
TDI
2015 GSW TDI S 6M
If you're referring to a dealer CPO warranty, VW only offers that on cars with "less than 72,000 or 75,000 miles (model-year specific)" so that narrows it down somewhat. SELs are more difficult to find than SE and S trim cars, and some here would gladly forego the SEL-specific sport seats and other amenities to avoid the trouble-prone (read: leaky) panoramic roof shared by the SEL and SE models. I sought out my S trim GSW for just that reason.
 

SoCal Surf

New member
Joined
Aug 28, 2020
Location
Los Angeles
TDI
Golf Sport Wagen
Thanks for the reply. Didn’t know about the sunroof issue, is there a fix for it or do they all leak and it’s just a matter of when? But to get back to my original question how many miles on the meter, before you get concerned on a used car purchase? I’ve been trying to stay under 45k, but wasn’t sure if I should be thinking lower. And the warranty I’m seeing at VW dealers is two years/24,000 miles on lower mile 2015’s.
Thanks again.
 

1854sailor

Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
Aug 10, 2004
Location
Westerly, RI
TDI
2015 Golf SE SportWagen, 2015 Golf SE Hatch Back.
Also remember that the emissions system has an eleven year, 162K mile warranty as a result of the "Dieselgate" agreement.
 

hskrdu

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Oct 17, 2003
Location
Maryland and New England
TDI
2003 Golf GLS 4D 5M, 2015 GSW SE 6M
If reliability and a simple/easy car experience is what you are looking for, the Mk7 TDI (especially in a vehicle with sunroof or DSG) may not be the car for you.

That being said, if you can deal with preventative measures for the sunroof, deal with standard fuel related issues, deal with issues which sometimes pop up associated with the DSG, a turbocharger, a DPF, SCR, and other emissions-related tech, deal with VW quirks and ocassional electrical gremlins, deal with a level of engine complexity notably beyond the much loved MkIV platform, and are willing to become a TDI guy through research, then the Mk7 GSW can be a great platform and outstanding car.

To speak to your specific questions:

The TDI is no different than other cars when comes to "how many miles before I should be concerned?," usually asked as "should I avoid a high mileage TDI?" I would suggest that maintenance, owner upkeep, driving style, and location are far more important than miles. I'll take a car with 200,000 highway miles from the non-rust belt, with all receipts and a good caretaker-owner over a car with 75,000 city miles and no service records. If you are looking at CPO only cars, then the mileage question isn't as much an issue, since, as said, VW sets CPO mileage limits. Also consider that the only Mk7 TDIs are 2015: If you're looking at a car in 2020 with 25,000 miles on it, you have to ask how many months it has sat without being exercised.

The TDI is different when it comes to engine-related work. As weak as VW dealer techs might be for standard problems, it's even harder to find a department that is good with diesels. The CPO Warranty is 2/24, as you said, with a $50 issue-related deductible, and helps for non-emissions related troubles. Of course, this means you are relying on the VW techs to work on your car. The CPO warranty (as owner of a CPO car) is largely meaningless to me, and the emissions warranty is what you should be banking on when looking at Mk7 TDIs. If this is news to you, then I'd suggest lots more research is in order.

If you are looking for a lease-like experience via the CPO, I don't think you'll find it. If your car goes to VW for non-diesel work, it's a roll of the dice if the service department correctly diagnoses and fixes the problem. If your car goes to VW for actual TDI-related work, you may find that you'll be without your car for days/weeks (and loaners seem to be at the discretion of the dealer).

Some other thoughts:
Among owners at TDIClub, the VW dealer service network is generally not well regarded. My 2003 has not been to a dealer since 2003. No one touches my cars except me (for all scheduled maint and other tasks) or a TDI guru for things I can't do. The only exception is emissions warranty work for the Mk7. Many of us avoid the dealer for TDI-related work at all costs. If you expect to have a positive TDI experience where no one maintains your car except the dealer, be sure your dealer has a rockstar TDI guy (and get to know them).

"Diesels run forever..." Be careful about applying conventional wisdom about diesels from twenty years ago to the Mk7 TDI. Most modern engines in passenger cars will easily run hundreds of thousands of miles if the maintenance schedule is followed. There are as many disadvantages with the Mk7 TDI engine as advantages- and some would say the negatives of the emissions equipment outweighs the overall positives. We have two Mk7's only because it was the last chance (for a while) to get a zero mile/low mile stick-shift TDI wagon in the US (at a great price). I kept my 2003, precisely because of the expected problems with the GSW (and because it's the best TDI platform). She liked the Mk7 so much she parted with her MkIV, but we kept it in the family.

Now, all that being said, I like the Mk7 a lot. Not as much as the MkIV, but IMO it's a great platform with a good engine that's burdened by both VW quirks and complex emissions issues.

If anything I've said is news, my advice is to spend more time reading the forums.

Hope this helps.
 

SoCal Surf

New member
Joined
Aug 28, 2020
Location
Los Angeles
TDI
Golf Sport Wagen
HSKRDU, thank you for such a well thought out explanation of what I can expect. I do lots of research before I buy anything (my wife thinks I'm nuts) so your response gave me lots to think about. I'm pretty anal about maintaining my stuff, so although I'm not super handy, I do scheduled oil changes, tire rotations, etc on time. But, you are kind of making it sound like I'm taking a risk with a TDI even if I keep my stuff maintained (honestly, the sunroof thing has me a bit bummed out. I live in SoCal, we rarely get rain, but I can't tell if I run a weed whacker line through the drain ports every 6 months to clear them out will be enough to keep from getting water in the car.) Thanks again for dose of reality. I guess I'm gonna have to rethink this.
 

Nuje

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Location
Island near Vancouver
TDI
2015 Sportwagen; Golf GLS 2002 (swap from 2L gas); 2016 A3 e-tron
There's also a "service campaign" (or wording to that effect...but NOT a "recall":rolleyes:) where VW dealer will do some work to make the clogging of the sunroof drains a lot less likely. We live surrounded by loads of coniferous trees (and not coincidentally, a semi-temperate rain forest) and end up with lots of needles and other tree debris on our car. But it wasn't until a bird mega-dumped all over the sunroof, and I decided to hose it off (for a good 10minutes) that I managed to clog up one of the rear drains and get a water stain on the headliner.

I think that so long as you are aware of your car's environment (and it sounds like you are), the sunroof isn't an issue. I love having one and know that it's another maintenance thing, but still worth it for me. If you have a covered parking where you work and live,*and* you're in SoCal, I doubt you'll have any sunroof issues.
 

adjat84th

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Location
Virginia Beach, VA
TDI
'01 Jetta TDI/'15 Golf TDI
If you have a covered parking where you work and live,*and* you're in SoCal, I doubt you'll have any sunroof issues.
My thoughts exactly! 94k on my Golf and 310k on my Jetta both without any leaks. Granted neither are pano roofs
 

hskrdu

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Oct 17, 2003
Location
Maryland and New England
TDI
2003 Golf GLS 4D 5M, 2015 GSW SE 6M
But, you are kind of making it sound like I'm taking a risk with a TDI even if I keep my stuff maintained (honestly, the sunroof thing has me a bit bummed out. I live in SoCal, we rarely get rain, but I can't tell if I run a weed whacker line through the drain ports every 6 months to clear them out will be enough to keep from getting water in the car.) Thanks again for dose of reality. I guess I'm gonna have to rethink this.
"Risk" is not the word I would use- or at least not the primary message that I intended to convey. There is risk in every car purchase, sometimes from a financial perspective, and always from a mechanical perspective, whether it is inherent to the car, or outside your control. Some cars are "riskier" than others, but again, I wouldn't necessarily say this of the Mk7 TDI- so far the cars seem to be fairly reliable, although that's both anecdotal and comes from a small sample size. Certainly if you consider yourself risk averse, you will want to research the Mk7 forums. What I was trying most to speak to was the idea that a CPO car, much less a CPO TDI would provide you with a lease-like experience similar to what you are used to. That doesn't mean you can't have a great experience with a Mk7 (as said, the girl parted with her much loved MkIV because her Mk7 was so good after 20k miles), but the issues I pointed out are things you should be researching and thinking about to help make an informed decision. The key items I was responding to in your post were that your previous cars were leases, that you didn't do much work yourself, and your focus on mileage.

Leasing a newer model year gasser (even one with lower mechanical reliability) can be fairly convenient for most lessees- which I guess is why so many people lease cars, despite the financial loss compared to owning (plus the chance to try lots of different cars, and stay in newer model year vehicles). The convenience comes from several things: Most newer cars generally experience mild mechanical issues compared with older cars (if not fewer issues), so a two year newer car lease might provide you the two most trouble-free years of that car's life. When you do have a problem with a leased car, you can take it to any service department (that meets the lease requirements) and generally expect that there will both the common parts and a mechanic that can address the issue. While your leased vehicle is in the shop, you may get offered a loaner- and certainly you'd expect your car to be ready within a reasonable amount of time, etc. In comparison to a CPO Mk7 TDI, you are starting with a car that's five years old. If it has low miles, it has been sitting (which IMO is the worst thing for it). The CPO provides bumper to bumper, but there may be no loaner, and if you have a engine related issue, the service department may struggle to deal with it (from using the wrong oil, to throwing parts at problems they can't properly diagnose). If you have a DPF problem, or other emissions-warranty related issue, you are covered by the E-warranty, but may be without your car for days (and without a loaner). Bottom line: You may have a great experience with a Mk7 TDI, but I wouldn't be looking for a new-car, lease-like experience.

Where are you in So-Cal? (I'm out at Camp Pend many times a year). If you are close to Brandon at SMS European in LB, this would solve what I said earlier about finding a rock star TDI tech.

Sunroof: Yes, there is a TSB for the sunroof. There are multiple issues that need to be addressed, and some owners have had success with these fixes. Certainly if the car is garaged or lives in a less-rainy environment, your chances of water intrusion are much lower. If not, you can have VW apply the TSB fixes. My Mk7 has the pano-sunroof, and VW will certainly not be allowed to pull my sunroof components, grind down the connection points, or take the plenum apart- that's asking for trouble from a VW service department. I've already removed the rear drain line caps, and will do the fronts before the winter, but I still expect to see new stains on the C pillar under the rare "wrong" conditions- why? Because if you cut a giant hole in the roof of a VW, water will find its way inside. I wouldn't tell you to avoid a Mk7 TDI because of the sunroof, but many members here have posted that the sought out an S model just to avoid the SR.

Lastly, I wasn't saying that the TDI presents more risk even if you have all the scheduled maintenance done, I was saying (similar to above) that a TDI is different. With a lease of a newer car, you do what over the first few years? Take it to the dealer for a few fluid/filter changes? Rotate the tires every 5k miles? Check the dipstick, top off the oil, wash it, add windshield washer fluid, and clean the interior? In my earlier post, in comparing MK7 TDI ownership with a lease, I said "deal with standard fuel related issues." Some members here will raise an eyebrow at that, but for many, we are so accustomed to it, we don't think about it from a gasser perspective. While I was writing this I asked the girl what it meant to "deal with standard fuel related issues." Without much hesitation, she said: Always use fuel stations with high turnover, so you don't get old fuel or avoid water in the fuel, know where your next diesel station will be if you are running low and away from truck routes, have a fuel adaptor in the trunk since the Mk7 won't take the middle sized nozzle, have some wipes handy in case the pump is a mess from careless customers, don't run too low on fuel to keep the system running best, make sure the pump dispenses #2 and don't judge by handle or sign color, let the foamy fuel settle since the Mk7 doesn't have an easy vent button like the MkIV, shoot for higher cetane stations if possible, add some anti-gel when expecting frigid temps, add fuel conditioner when concerned with fuel quality/water/cetane, don't use bio-d above 5-10%, don't use the untaxed #2, save the receipt and note the odometer for pen and paper calculations. Most of us don't even think about these things (and some will disagree with my notes). I certainly don't worry about any of it, but it's just once slice of what's different in a 5 year old TDI vs a new gasser lease to which you may be accustomed. There are thousands of TDI owners driving around in bliss, unconcerned with any of this, but since you self-described as anal about maintaining stuff, think about letting your turbo cool off before highway shut-down, or monitoring your DPF so you avoid shut-down while it's at 600* Celsius, or wonky DSG shifts after Phase2 emissions mods (we have only stick-shifts, so someone else can better speak to DSG issues).

In the end, if you love the TDI, the joy of ownership includes the joy of upkeep and learning about your car. Reliability is not what keeps TDIClub going, but the rational and emotional attachment that (many) owners have with their cars, and the community that has developed to share fixes, troubles, and triumphs.

HTH.
 
Last edited:

RIP TDI

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 16, 2000
Location
Santa Barbara, CA
TDI
'15 GSW SE 6MT, '01 Golf GLS 5MT, '96 Passat variant
To hskrdu's very thoughtful and helpful posts, I would add some emphasis to one of his points and add another point.

Avoiding shutting down when the DPF is regenerating is highly recommended, but it requires you to monitor regen status regularly and at times alter your driving plans or route to allow the regen to complete before shutting down. This happens somewhere between every 180 - 250 miles, depending on driving conditions and this frequency can be a definite inconvenience if you haven't accepted this as another tradeoff of owning a TDI.

Regarding some TDI owner's preference for the S model because of its lack of sunroof, if seat comfort/adjustability and night vision are important considerations for you, the SEL with its upgraded seats and Lighting Package offer really big improvements in these areas. While its true that SEL (or GTI) seats can be retrofitted, Lighting Package retrofitting is a much more involved proposition, and the aftermarket alternatives to the borderline-inadequate standard halogen reflector headlights, while less cost- and labor intensive, are somewhat compromised for performance and/or quality.

FWIW, in my SE wagon I have the pano roof, retrofitted SEL seats and arguably the best of the aftermarket headlight systems, but if I had to do it all over again, I would have gotten an SEL for the Lighting Package alone. I have accepted the design/production shortfalls of the pano roof and, fortunately, eliminating the drain tube check valves solved the leakage issue for me.

TDI owner's either learn to accept the weak points, while celebrating the uniqueness of these cars, or they move on to more conventional or reliable alternatives.
 

RIP TDI

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 16, 2000
Location
Santa Barbara, CA
TDI
'15 GSW SE 6MT, '01 Golf GLS 5MT, '96 Passat variant
Hah...I should have said "for the Lighting Package and 12-way seats"! Believe it or not, I bought my car primarily for the color combo, knowing I would be foregoing the LP and SEL seats (some SEs had the LP, some didn't)
 

Nuje

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Location
Island near Vancouver
TDI
2015 Sportwagen; Golf GLS 2002 (swap from 2L gas); 2016 A3 e-tron
The upgrade in the quality and comfort of the seats in the SEL (Highline) over SE and S (Comfortline and Trendline, respectively in RoW) is not to be underestimated as well. That'd be my first upgrade if I didn't have the top trim.
 

bigb

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2018
Location
Arizona
TDI
2015 Sportwagon S
The upgrade in the quality and comfort of the seats in the SEL (Highline) over SE and S (Comfortline and Trendline, respectively in RoW) is not to be underestimated as well. That'd be my first upgrade if I didn't have the top trim.
When you upgrade from the base seats does the seat height end up being any higher? One of the reasons I bought a base model was the headroom with no sunroof is greater but I wonder if SEL seats would take away some of that headroom? (I don't have much to spare) I've found in other vehicles sometimes better seats mean more stuff like motors underneath and padding that can steal precious headroom.
 

After8

New member
Joined
Jul 4, 2020
Location
Toronto
TDI
2013 Jetta
"Risk" is not the word I would use- or at least not the primary message that I intended to convey. There is risk in every car purchase, sometimes from a financial perspective, and always from a mechanical perspective, whether it is inherent to the car, or outside your control. Some cars are "riskier" than others, but again, I wouldn't necessarily say this of the Mk7 TDI- so far the cars seem to be fairly reliable, although that's both anecdotal and comes from a small sample size. Certainly if you consider yourself risk averse, you will want to research the Mk7 forums. What I was trying most to speak to was the idea that a CPO car, much less a CPO TDI would provide you with a lease-like experience similar to what you are used to. That doesn't mean you can't have a great experience with a Mk7 (as said, the girl parted with her much loved MkIV because her Mk7 was so good after 20k miles), but the issues I pointed out are things you should be researching and thinking about to help make an informed decision. The key items I was responding to in your post were that your previous cars were leases, that you didn't do much work yourself, and your focus on mileage.

Leasing a newer model year gasser (even one with lower mechanical reliability) can be fairly convenient for most lessees- which I guess is why so many people lease cars, despite the financial loss compared to owning (plus the chance to try lots of different cars, and stay in newer model year vehicles). The convenience comes from several things: Most newer cars generally experience mild mechanical issues compared with older cars (if not fewer issues), so a two year newer car lease might provide you the two most trouble-free years of that car's life. When you do have a problem with a leased car, you can take it to any service department (that meets the lease requirements) and generally expect that there will both the common parts and a mechanic that can address the issue. While your leased vehicle is in the shop, you may get offered a loaner- and certainly you'd expect your car to be ready within a reasonable amount of time, etc. In comparison to a CPO Mk7 TDI, you are starting with a car that's five years old. If it has low miles, it has been sitting (which IMO is the worst thing for it). The CPO provides bumper to bumper, but there may be no loaner, and if you have a engine related issue, the service department may struggle to deal with it (from using the wrong oil, to throwing parts at problems they can't properly diagnose). If you have a DPF problem, or other emissions-warranty related issue, you are covered by the E-warranty, but may be without your car for days (and without a loaner). Bottom line: You may have a great experience with a Mk7 TDI, but I wouldn't be looking for a new-car, lease-like experience.

Where are you in So-Cal? (I'm out at Camp Pend many times a year). If you are close to Brandon at SMS European in LB, this would solve what I said earlier about finding a rock star TDI tech.

Sunroof: Yes, there is a TSB for the sunroof. There are multiple issues that need to be addressed, and some owners have had success with these fixes. Certainly if the car is garaged or lives in a less-rainy environment, your chances of water intrusion are much lower. If not, you can have VW apply the TSB fixes. My Mk7 has the pano-sunroof, and VW will certainly not be allowed to pull my sunroof components, grind down the connection points, or take the plenum apart- that's asking for trouble from a VW service department. I've already removed the rear drain line caps, and will do the fronts before the winter, but I still expect to see new stains on the C pillar under the rare "wrong" conditions- why? Because if you cut a giant hole in the roof of a VW, water will find its way inside. I wouldn't tell you to avoid a Mk7 TDI because of the sunroof, but many members here have posted that the sought out an S model just to avoid the SR.

Lastly, I wasn't saying that the TDI presents more risk even if you have all the scheduled maintenance done, I was saying (similar to above) that a TDI is different. With a lease of a newer car, you do what over the first few years? Take it to the dealer for a few fluid/filter changes? Rotate the tires every 5k miles? Check the dipstick, top off the oil, wash it, add windshield washer fluid, and clean the interior? In my earlier post, in comparing MK7 TDI ownership with a lease, I said "deal with standard fuel related issues." Some members here will raise an eyebrow at that, but for many, we are so accustomed to it, we don't think about it from a gasser perspective. While I was writing this I asked the girl what it meant to "deal with standard fuel related issues." Without much hesitation, she said: Always use fuel stations with high turnover, so you don't get old fuel or avoid water in the fuel, know where your next diesel station will be if you are running low and away from truck routes, have a fuel adaptor in the trunk since the Mk7 won't take the middle sized nozzle, have some wipes handy in case the pump is a mess from careless customers, don't run too low on fuel to keep the system running best, make sure the pump dispenses #2 and don't judge by handle or sign color, let the foamy fuel settle since the Mk7 doesn't have an easy vent button like the MkIV, shoot for higher cetane stations if possible, add some anti-gel when expecting frigid temps, add fuel conditioner when concerned with fuel quality/water/cetane, don't use bio-d above 5-10%, don't use the untaxed #2, save the receipt and note the odometer for pen and paper calculations. Most of us don't even think about these things (and some will disagree with my notes). I certainly don't worry about any of it, but it's just once slice of what's different in a 5 year old TDI vs a new gasser lease to which you may be accustomed. There are thousands of TDI owners driving around in bliss, unconcerned with any of this, but since you self-described as anal about maintaining stuff, think about letting your turbo cool off before highway shut-down, or monitoring your DPF so you avoid shut-down while it's at 600* Celsius, or wonky DSG shifts after Phase2 emissions mods (we have only stick-shifts, so someone else can better speak to DSG issues).

In the end, if you love the TDI, the joy of ownership includes the joy of upkeep and learning about your car. Reliability is not what keeps TDIClub going, but the rational and emotional attachment that (many) owners have with their cars, and the community that has developed to share fixes, troubles, and triumphs.

HTH.
" Reliability is not what keeps TDIClub going, but the rational and emotional attachment that (many) owners have with their cars, and the community that has developed to share fixes, troubles, and triumphs "
So True!
 

whizznbyu

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2006
Location
Waxhaw, NC
TDI
2015 Golf Sportwagen 6 speed manual. B5 died at 302k miles.
Also remember that the emissions system has an eleven year, 162K mile warranty as a result of the "Dieselgate" agreement.
Emissions would be DPF, AdBlue, EGR? Drivetrain warranty: is it 5 or 6 years/60,000 miles? Drivetrain would include TURBO?
 

1854sailor

Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
Aug 10, 2004
Location
Westerly, RI
TDI
2015 Golf SE SportWagen, 2015 Golf SE Hatch Back.
I'll have to find the actual warranty document to be sure. Our hatchback has a slow weep from the water pump and the dealer said that it was covered under the extended TDI warranty. Parts are on order.

Emissions would be DPF, AdBlue, EGR? Drivetrain warranty: is it 5 or 6 years/60,000 miles? Drivetrain would include TURBO?
 

hskrdu

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Oct 17, 2003
Location
Maryland and New England
TDI
2003 Golf GLS 4D 5M, 2015 GSW SE 6M
Gen 3:

The emissions system warranty shall cover the following parts or systems:
  • The entire exhaust after treatment system, including the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst, the Diesel Particulate Filter, the Selective Catalytic Reduction converter, the dosing injector and other Diesel Exhaust Fluid system components, the exhaust flap, and all sensors and actuators
  • The entire fuel system, including fuel pumps, high pressure fuel rail, fuel injectors, vibration damper, pressure control valve and all sensors and actuators
  • The EGR system, including EGR valves, EGR cooler, EGR filter, EGR
  • temperature sensor, all related hoses and pipes, and all sensors
  • and actuators
  • The turbocharger, including the turbocharger damper
  • The On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) system, including SCR DEF quality sensor, and any malfunctions detected by the OBD systems other than those related to the transmission.
Additionally, the engine long block warranty shall cover the engine sub-assembly that consists of the assembled block, crankshaft, cylinder head, camshaft, and valve train.

The extended emissions warranty includes parts, labor, and applicable taxes. The extended emissions warranty shall not void or supersede any existing warranty. Conflicts concerning the warranty are to be resolved in favor of the consumer.

From:

For a 2015 Gen 3 VW the warranty is outlined in this booklet and provides that:

The warranty for other model year vehicles can be found in their respective warranty booklets under Emissions Modification heading on https://www.vwcourtsettlement.com/en/2-0-models/
 

ticaf

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Location
US Mid-Atlantic
TDI
Stock 2015 Golf SW S Manual TDI
I know diesels run forever
Oh boy... Modern diesels in consumer cars are pretty much on par with modern gasoline engines on consumer cars.
Now, industrial,marine and agricultural diesels WILL run forever in the sense that they are designed to get overhauled every 10k to 20k hours.

The only sensible reason to get a diesel IMO is the fuel efficiency. And that's valid only if you drive A LOT.
Otherwise, it's more of a hassle than a benefit, at least in the USA. In Europe for instance, diesels are so ubiquitous there is almost no debate.
 

whizznbyu

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2006
Location
Waxhaw, NC
TDI
2015 Golf Sportwagen 6 speed manual. B5 died at 302k miles.
Gen 3:

The emissions system warranty shall cover the following parts or systems:
  • The entire exhaust after treatment system, including the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst, the Diesel Particulate Filter, the Selective Catalytic Reduction converter, the dosing injector and other Diesel Exhaust Fluid system components, the exhaust flap, and all sensors and actuators
  • The entire fuel system, including fuel pumps, high pressure fuel rail, fuel injectors, vibration damper, pressure control valve and all sensors and actuators
  • The EGR system, including EGR valves, EGR cooler, EGR filter, EGR
  • temperature sensor, all related hoses and pipes, and all sensors
  • and actuators
  • The turbocharger, including the turbocharger damper
  • The On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) system, including SCR DEF quality sensor, and any malfunctions detected by the OBD systems other than those related to the transmission.
Additionally, the engine long block warranty shall cover the engine sub-assembly that consists of the assembled block, crankshaft, cylinder head, camshaft, and valve train.

The extended emissions warranty includes parts, labor, and applicable taxes. The extended emissions warranty shall not void or supersede any existing warranty. Conflicts concerning the warranty are to be resolved in favor of the consumer.

From:
Thank you for sharing this.
 

Rowan Lyon

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Location
Cold Lake, AB
TDI
2006 Jetta Wagon GLS 1.9 TDI BEW
Pet peave, every winter repairs to the DEF line behind the passenger tire near the DEF tank. Love the car hate the still under warranty redundant repair! 2015 post court case new purchase in 2017.
 

Mike in Anchorage

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2009
Location
Anchorage, AK
TDI
2016 Touareg Lux, 2015 Golf Sportwagen SE, new 4 Sept 2017;2009 VW Jetta TDI Sportwagen (Ruby) sold to VW on 22 SEP 2017
FWIW, I live in Alaska and the 2015 is my second Sportwagen. I also had a 2009. Neither caused me any problems with the sunroof - leakage or inoperation. I've never had any problems with the AdBlue system in the three+ years I've had the car. So, as you see, some folks have problems and others do not. Best wishes. I really love my 2015 TDI Sportwagen SE.
 

thundershorts

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 15, 2010
Location
west chester pa
TDI
2015 passat tdi sel premium 2015 golf s tdi gls tdi b5.5, 2002 eurovan,Peugeot 505 td,Citroen cx25 prestige
The prices for the 2015 sport wagons around here have increased about 4000 lately as the auction supply has dried up.
 
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