Moving from '05 Passat to '13 - a few questions

Passat'n Adventure

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Location
Augusta, GA area
TDI
05 Passat GLS Wagon - Deleted and 5 speeded
I currently have a B5.5 and I have been through the 'challenges' that present themselves. I am currently trying to decide if I should move into a new model - and are some of the old gremlins still there? Is the BSM still part of the mix in the new automatics? Does the new engine require exhaust fluid? (I have seen mentions of urea in the maintenance posts). I am trying to figure these things out before I step foot onto the floor of a showroom.
 

kydsid

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2012
Location
Texas
TDI
2012 Passat
I'll answer the one I can about exhaust fluid, yes it requires it, but uses on the order of 2-3 gallons (avg) per 10k miles. This means the overall expense per mile is very minimal. The cost of the fluid shouldn't be a concern. If extra systems, computers, wiring etc worry you then that is a valid concern for exhaust fluid. But I was not swayed by that and have been driving diesels, mostly pickups, for 17 years.

Don't know what BSM is, however I can say I love the DSG. Very smooth, does take some time to adjust your driving. Some people are annoyed by its reactions, I am not. I am not afraid or dissapointed with it even though I am soon to do the 40k service.

I am first time VW buyer and like the car, however several B5 owners have had neutral to negative reactions to this car. Please test driver extensively to know what you are and are not getting in comparison to the B5.

Cheers good luck and welcome to TDIclub.
 

TDI2000Zim

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Location
NJ
TDI
VW hat meinen '14 Passat TDiSE getötet.
When you switch the ignition ON, count to five before cranking the engine (particularly after two weeks of parking). The High-Pressure-Fuel-Pump can't run dry.
 

50harleyrider

Veteran Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Location
charleston,wv
TDI
2005 B5.5 TDI/geared BSM, BV43A turbo,stage 2 TDTUNING. 2005 5sp manual passat tdi stage 2 tdtuning,BSM delete. 2015 Passat TDI 6sp manual.
I currently have a B5.5 and I have been through the 'challenges' that present themselves. I am currently trying to decide if I should move into a new model - and are some of the old gremlins still there? Is the BSM still part of the mix in the new automatics? Does the new engine require exhaust fluid? (I have seen mentions of urea in the maintenance posts). I am trying to figure these things out before I step foot onto the floor of a showroom.
I'm running both so my $.02 worth: Overall, the B5.5 is a better made car and bit higher quality. Remember I'm in B5.5 automatics and B7 manual. The manual is far superior in every way to the automatic in the B5.5. I test drove a 2012 DSG B7 and while it is a big improvement on my tiptronic, can't compare to the manual for fun, economy and performance not to mention maintenance down the road. Comfort and convenience are similar with the edge to the B7 just because it is evolved although my right knee hits the plastic tunnel in the B7 which I don't like and have heard other leggy drivers complain about. All in all, I'd advise you to convert your B5.5 to manual 5 sp, do the BSM delete and save your money. Overall, I have to barely give the B5.5 the edge although warrantys are nice to have and who knows what quirks will arise down the road in the B7.
 
Last edited:

TDI2000Zim

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Location
NJ
TDI
VW hat meinen '14 Passat TDiSE getötet.
there is no prime pump, am I worng?
The 'prime pump', aka, the fuel sender, normally needs a second or two to lift diesel from the tank and have the CR HPFP fed during start up, and if it is cold, make that 5 seconds.

But if the car has been parked for two weeks with cold weather, better wait 10 seconds or more before cranking.

See this thread: http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=341082
 
Last edited:

phlfly

Banned
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Location
N.VA
TDI
Passat SEL
The 'prime pump', aka, the fuel sender, normally needs a second or two to lift diesel from the tank and have the CR HPFP fed during start up, and if it is cold, make that 5 seconds.

But if the car has been parked for two weeks with cold weather, better wait 10 seconds or more before cranking.

See this thread: http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=341082
I thought I read here, when you push start button to go accessories /on position, but not a start an engine. So the tank fuel pump doesn’t work in this position?:confused:
And this feature is only on Passat since it’s only one pump, compare to Jetta it has two pump before going to HPFP.
 

JSWTDI09

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jan 31, 2009
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada
TDI
2009 JSW TDI (gone but not forgotten)
To answer the OP's other question - there is no BSM issue with the new Passats. It is a totally different engine. There is no chain driven balance shaft.

Have Fun!

Don
 

TheGrove

TDIClub Enthusiast, Veteran Member
Joined
May 17, 2006
Location
S Central PA (Breezewood)
TDI
2012 Passat SEL Premium Opera Red - Dieselgate Fix, KermaTDI Tune, 2004 Passat GLS Northern Green-RIP
I currently have a B5.5 and I have been through the 'challenges' that present themselves. I am currently trying to decide if I should move into a new model - and are some of the old gremlins still there? Is the BSM still part of the mix in the new automatics? Does the new engine require exhaust fluid? (I have seen mentions of urea in the maintenance posts). I am trying to figure these things out before I step foot onto the floor of a showroom.
There is no BSM to worry about.

I thought I read here, when you push start button to go accessories /on position, but not a start an engine. So the tank fuel pump doesn’t work in this position?:confused:
And this feature is only on Passat since it’s only one pump, compare to Jetta it has two pump before going to HPFP.
The tank pump will work in the accessory position for a few seconds.
 

DonC

Veteran Member
Joined
May 5, 2004
Location
New England
TDI
2004 Passat TDI 2013 Passat TDI SE
I previously owned a 2004 TDI 2.0 and loved the car. It gave me many miles of good service but for some issues. The sunroof leaked through the tubing connection that would make the floor damp if not wet causing me to use towels under the monster mats in an attempt to soak up the "dampness". Only after I traded the car did I become aware that VW knew of this "deficiency". Also, cells started to appear as perhaps the transmition control module on the passenger front foot well got "wet" and caused some problems in the harness and wires to the solenoid valves in the transmition. The only other issues were a leaking CVT boot and the BSM change out that I avoided doing at 106,700 miles. I decided to trade my "baby" for a 2013 SE TDI and am pleased even though its relatively brand new. I'm impressed with the quality of this vehicle and only hope that the turbo issues are resolved BEFORE going through the headache of a replacement. I believe that the engine is well designed and could have the same lifespan as the 5.5. I intend to keep it a long time.
 

phlfly

Banned
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Location
N.VA
TDI
Passat SEL
There is no BSM to worry about.



The tank pump will work in the accessory position for a few seconds.
Good to know, so after fuel filter change, it could be use this method for sevaral time to get enough fuel to HPFP.
 

Passat'n Adventure

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Location
Augusta, GA area
TDI
05 Passat GLS Wagon - Deleted and 5 speeded
To answer the OP's other question - there is no BSM issue with the new Passats. It is a totally different engine. There is no chain driven balance shaft.

Have Fun!

Don
Glad to hear that the BSM is not included. What about oil requirements - have they invented a new standard for this one?
 

Passat'n Adventure

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Location
Augusta, GA area
TDI
05 Passat GLS Wagon - Deleted and 5 speeded
I'm running both so my $.02 worth: Overall, the B5.5 is a better made car and bit higher quality. Remember I'm in B5.5 automatics and B7 manual. The manual is far superior in every way to the automatic in the B5.5. I test drove a 2012 DSG B7 and while it is a big improvement on my tiptronic, can't compare to the manual for fun, economy and performance not to mention maintenance down the road. Comfort and convenience are similar with the edge to the B7 just because it is evolved although my right knee hits the plastic tunnel in the B7 which I don't like and have heard other leggy drivers complain about. All in all, I'd advise you to convert your B5.5 to manual 5 sp, do the BSM delete and save your money. Overall, I have to barely give the B5.5 the edge although warrantys are nice to have and who knows what quirks will arise down the road in the B7.
Since you have experienced both and had some time with them, I appreciate your input...... do you worry about the turbo issue that has been discussed so much with the B7?
 

hysterwv

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2006
Location
WV, OH, KY
I've had both, sold my B5.5 to 50harleyrider (he had more than one) at 320k miles. It was a "solid" car. Did the BSM (after mine failed), and all the "regular" stuff. Really pretty problem free.

I'm 6'1" and haven't had issues with my knee on the tunnel. In fact, I find it more comfortable than the B5.5, but then again the suspension (and drivers seat) was pretty worn at 300k+ miles. I have 23k miles on my '12 that I bought in September and even though it's slightly less "solid", I'm enjoying it much more. Bigger, modern features, higher mpgs. There were a few posters here that have over 70k miles with no turbo issues. I'm not too worried about it. It's not a "certainty" like the BSM issue.

I'm satisfied with the DSG, but I drive 99% highway. Not much shifting going on. The 40k mile DSG services aren't cheap, but that's OK.
 
Last edited:

Mbmaring

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2001
Location
Hendrum MN
TDI
2012 Passat TDI SEL Black on Black
When you switch the ignition ON, count to five before cranking the engine (particularly after two weeks of parking). The High-Pressure-Fuel-Pump can't run dry.
Hard to to when I only have a start button! Still getting use to not needing a key in the ignition
 

VeeDubTDI

Wanderluster, Traveler, TDIClub Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 2, 2000
Location
Springfield, VA
TDI
‘18 Tesla Model 3D+, ‘14 Cadillac ELR, ‘13 Fiat 500e
The tank pump does not run until you start the engine. Sitting with the ignition on will not pump any fuel anywhere. Climb back there and listen to it for yourself.
 

compu_85

Gadget Guy
Joined
Sep 29, 2003
Location
Springfield VA
TDI
... None :S
When you switch the ignition ON, count to five before cranking the engine (particularly after two weeks of parking). The High-Pressure-Fuel-Pump can't run dry.
The in tank pump does not run when the key is just switched on. It runs when the engine is running, I don't know if it runs while cranking. I'll try to test this weekend.

-J


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

TurboDieselPoint

Veteran Member
Joined
May 16, 2012
Location
N/A
TDI
2014 Passat TDI SE 6-Speed Manual
Perhaps there a fuel pump relay in the fuesebox or something that could be bypassed to run the lift pump?
 

JSWTDI09

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jan 31, 2009
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada
TDI
2009 JSW TDI (gone but not forgotten)
Glad to hear that the BSM is not included. What about oil requirements - have they invented a new standard for this one?
Yes. All 2009+ TDIs require a low SAPS synthetic motor oil. VW's specification is 507.00. All 507 oils are (by definition) 5W30 oils. If you decide you want a thicker oil, there are 5W40 oils that meet Mercedes Benz specification 229.51 that are also safe. Using any oil that is not low SAPS risks damaging your very expensive emissions system. Do not let some cheap oil change place change your oil. Do it yourself or go to a trusted mechanic that knows what kind of oil is required.

Have Fun!

Don
 

TDI2000Zim

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Location
NJ
TDI
VW hat meinen '14 Passat TDiSE getötet.
The tank pump does not run until you start the engine. Sitting with the ignition on will not pump any fuel anywhere. Climb back there and listen to it for yourself.
Then the remote start has no reason to wait a few seconds in cold weather to crank the engine the moment you click it, as is currently the case.

Whatever it is, whether it is slow fuel sender suction of cold fuel, or the need to warm up the cylinders with the glow plug, VAG has designed the remote start to WAIT during start up to crank the engine in cold weather.

I can't contradict the engineers in VAG, it is better to hold that key ON for a few seconds before cranking in cold weather, as they have programmed the remote start to do.

Still, when you crank it, and it takes more than one turn of the flywheel, it doesn't sound to me as cold cylinders, but of no fuel delivery ;).
 

compu_85

Gadget Guy
Joined
Sep 29, 2003
Location
Springfield VA
TDI
... None :S
Then the remote start has no reason to wait a few seconds in cold weather to crank the engine the moment you click it, as is currently the case....Whatever it is, whether it is slow fuel sender suction of cold fuel, or the need to warm up the cylinders with the glow plug, VAG has designed the remote start to WAIT during start up to crank the engine in cold weather....
It's called preglow ;) Older cars had the text "WAIT TO START" in the cluster instead of the coily icon. That's what the remote start / pushbutton start is waiting for.

-Jason
 

VeeDubTDI

Wanderluster, Traveler, TDIClub Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 2, 2000
Location
Springfield, VA
TDI
‘18 Tesla Model 3D+, ‘14 Cadillac ELR, ‘13 Fiat 500e
Then the remote start has no reason to wait a few seconds in cold weather to crank the engine the moment you click it, as is currently the case.

Whatever it is, whether it is slow fuel sender suction of cold fuel, or the need to warm up the cylinders with the glow plug, VAG has designed the remote start to WAIT during start up to crank the engine in cold weather.

I can't contradict the engineers in VAG, it is better to hold that key ON for a few seconds before cranking in cold weather, as they have programmed the remote start to do.

Still, when you crank it, and it takes more than one turn of the flywheel, it doesn't sound to me as cold cylinders, but of no fuel delivery ;).
It is waiting for the GLOW PLUGS :eek: :confused: :p :rolleyes: ;) :D

Just a thought, considering the engine waits for the GLOW PLUG LIGHT to turn off before cranking, and the colder it is, the longer it waits.
 
Last edited:

VeeDubTDI

Wanderluster, Traveler, TDIClub Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 2, 2000
Location
Springfield, VA
TDI
‘18 Tesla Model 3D+, ‘14 Cadillac ELR, ‘13 Fiat 500e
Also, almost every vehicle ever made takes more than one revolution of the engine before it is running. Remember back to the days of your 2000 TDI...
 

TDI2000Zim

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Location
NJ
TDI
VW hat meinen '14 Passat TDiSE getötet.
Also, almost every vehicle ever made takes more than one revolution of the engine before it is running. Remember back to the days of your 2000 TDI...
Cranking that 2000 Bug with its bad fuel sender gave me even nightmares. Nothing makes it feel like having dry heaves than trying to crank when fuel wasn't getting to the fuel pump and the combustion chamber.

BUT, that ALH HPFP never broke down.
 

phlfly

Banned
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Location
N.VA
TDI
Passat SEL
There is no BSM to worry about.



The tank pump will work in the accessory position for a few seconds.
The tank pump does not run until you start the engine. Sitting with the ignition on will not pump any fuel anywhere. Climb back there and listen to it for yourself.
That what I thought as well, but other member is saying different.
 

JSWTDI09

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jan 31, 2009
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada
TDI
2009 JSW TDI (gone but not forgotten)
BUT, that ALH HPFP never broke down.
The ALH HPFP never failed, because it doesn't exist. There was no HPFP on an ALH - hence no failures. The fuel pump on an ALH runs at much lower pressures. You are comparing apples and oranges.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that there are not problems with CR HPFPs. I'm just saying that comparing a new CR engine to an ALH is hardly a fair comparison. They are very different in many ways.

Have Fun!

Don
 

TDI2000Zim

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Location
NJ
TDI
VW hat meinen '14 Passat TDiSE getötet.
The ALH HPFP never failed, because it doesn't exist. There was no HPFP on an ALH - hence no failures. The fuel pump on an ALH runs at much lower pressures. You are comparing apples and oranges.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that there are not problems with CR HPFPs. I'm just saying that comparing a new CR engine to an ALH is hardly a fair comparison. They are very different in many ways.

Have Fun!

Don
The ALH fuel pump is also a high pressure fuel pump (http://tdiclub.com/TDIFAQ/TDiFAQ-1.html). Perhaps half the pressure, but high pressure nonetheless.

And very much less prone to failure.
 

VeeDubTDI

Wanderluster, Traveler, TDIClub Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 2, 2000
Location
Springfield, VA
TDI
‘18 Tesla Model 3D+, ‘14 Cadillac ELR, ‘13 Fiat 500e
The ALH fuel pump is referred to as an injection pump. Please don't start calling it a high pressure fuel pump as that will only confuse new members and visitors.
 
Top