MK6 brake job

sgoldste01

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ESFlash

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Austin TX
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Do you really need a special tool that rotates while squeezing the rear brake piston back into the caliper?

============= In one word "yes" -- if you try the old wooden block "C" clamp method you will screw up the system plus it's really not that big of a deal --- I got a loaner tool from Advance auto parts -- ask for a Windback Tool for doing brakes, you give them a deposit and they loan a little kit that fits various sizes.. When you are done, return it and get all your bread back......free....can't beat the price.

Other auto parts places besides Advance have a loaner tools -- it's not worth buying this thing unless you are in the repair business.
 

HaveBulldogWillTravel

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I've also read that it's important to bleed your brake lines every two years, regardless of mileage. Really? My brakes feel great. Why mess with it?
Bleeding brakes every 2 years will greatly extend caliper life. It gets all of the moisture out of the system. The moisture always settles at the lowest point in the system...the calipers. Bleed'em!
 

740GLE

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harbor freight has a tool for $40 that has all the attachments in the world, worked on my saab 9-3 arc and should work when i'll need to do my jetta, metalnerd has one cheaper but only one attachment.
 
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sgoldste01

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Bleeding brakes every 2 years will greatly extend caliper life. It gets all of the moisture out of the system. The moisture always settles at the lowest point in the system...the calipers. Bleed'em!
Is this true of all auto brands, or is this a VW idiosyncrasy? I don't remember any of my Hondas expecting this every two years.
 

hotpocketdeath

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Is this true of all auto brands, or is this a VW idiosyncrasy? I don't remember any of my Hondas expecting this every two years.
This is a recommendation for all vehicles on the road (except for vehicles with Air Brakes, but they get a different servicing).

http://www.schleeter.com/maintenance-tips.htm
Brake fluid has been and still is the most neglected maintenance item.

Car makers have excluded brake fluid in the maintenance schedule in order to keep the costs of long term service to a minimum. This won't effect you if you have leased your car or don't plan on keeping it past the warranty period. However, if you plan on driving your car past 100,000 or 200,000 miles, changing the brake fluid every 2 years will have a significant impact on long term repair costs by preventing expensive brake or clutch hydraulic system repairs (clutches use brake fluid).
Virtually all maintenance sites will give the same recommendation.
 
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lou95gts

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harbor freight has a tool for $40 that has all the attachments in the world, worked on my saab 9-3 arc and should work when i'll need to do my jetta, metalnerd has one cheaper but only one attachment.
I can vouch for the Harbor Freight kit. Works like a charm. $34 on sale.
 

ECS Tuning

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Yes, every 40K you should flush your brakes and add new - over time the fluid will brake down, giving a less responsive feel.
 

sgoldste01

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Yes, every 40K you should flush your brakes and add new - over time the fluid will brake down, giving a less responsive feel.
I understand the consensus that we need to flush the lines every 2 years to remove accumulated water. But I've also heard that you don't need to add fluid between flushes (assuming you don't have a leak) because it's normal for the fluid level to drop as the pads wear, and if you bring the fluid level up between brake pad replacements, then when you compress the pistons to install new brake pads, you'll overflow the reservoir.
 

GraniteRooster

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I understand the consensus that we need to flush the lines every 2 years to remove accumulated water. But I've also heard that you don't need to add fluid between flushes (assuming you don't have a leak) because it's normal for the fluid level to drop as the pads wear, and if you bring the fluid level up between brake pad replacements, then when you compress the pistons to install new brake pads, you'll overflow the reservoir.
Yes, that is right. I am guessing that ECS meant adding new fluid while flushing totally through.
 
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Savageman69

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How many miles are on this car? Shouldnt be changing brakes on a mk6 yet these brakes last a long time
 

sgoldste01

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How many miles are on this car? Shouldnt be changing brakes on a mk6 yet these brakes last a long time
I just learned to do my own brakes on my wife's 2003 Honda Odyssey. So now I'm researching the brake replacement process on the Golf to see how similar/different the process is. The rotating pistons in the rear calipers is one difference.

Through my research about replacing the rotors and pads, I learned that we're supposed to bleed the brake/clutch lines every 2 years (my Golf is almost exactly 2 years old right now). I wouldn't have stumbled across that piece of info if it wasn't for my brake rotor/pad replacement research. I guess I should have done that several times by now on the Odyssey too, but I didn't know. With 120k miles on it, I'm thinking it's too late, the damage is already done on that car. And then there's my 1999 Civic; too late for that car as well.
 

warbird24

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I've not looked at the calipers on mine yet. As others have said, the pads wear very little and should last well over 40K miles.

After replacing the rear sway bar, I'll put money on it that the caliper bolts are 12 point or triple square variety. Not sure of this, but that could cause a snafu if you elect to do them yourself.

Both Major Auto Parts stores in Webster have the needed caliper piston tool. If you've never used one, ask for a demo and I am sure someone can show you.
 

Savageman69

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I've not looked at the calipers on mine yet. As others have said, the pads wear very little and should last well over 40K miles.

After replacing the rear sway bar, I'll put money on it that the caliper bolts are 12 point or triple square variety. Not sure of this, but that could cause a snafu if you elect to do them yourself.

Both Major Auto Parts stores in Webster have the needed caliper piston tool. If you've never used one, ask for a demo and I am sure someone can show you.
40k??? I hope thats a joke..i have over 35k and they havent even started wearing yet...if its anything like my mk4 they last well over 160k
 

TDI_Timmy

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I understand the consensus that we need to flush the lines every 2 years to remove accumulated water. But I've also heard that you don't need to add fluid between flushes (assuming you don't have a leak) because it's normal for the fluid level to drop as the pads wear, and if you bring the fluid level up between brake pad replacements, then when you compress the pistons to install new brake pads, you'll overflow the reservoir.
Why not get the fluid back up to the max line? This insures as the pads wear further you have plenty of fluid in there.

Also, when doing a brake job (I usually coincide with a full flush) I empty the reservoir first with the turkey baster so that when I push pistons back there is plenty of room. Then, when doing the flush I empty reservoir again and add new fluid as I am going through the bleeding process.
 

sgoldste01

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Why not get the fluid back up to the max line? This insures as the pads wear further you have plenty of fluid in there.
I believe the reason for this is that the volume of extra fluid in the reservoir is enough that even if the pads wear all the way down, the fluid will not go below the minimum line. Thus, when the pads are replaced and the pistons are compressed all the back into the calipers, the fluid will rise again to the max line all by itself, with no fluid ever having been added.
 

Turboneon1997

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Maybe he is just changing to some pads that don't suck. The special tool for the rear brakes isn't required, but it makes life sooo much easier. and yes bleeding the brakes every few years with some quality fluid. Especially if you are tough on brakes
 

Personne

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How many miles are on this car? Shouldnt be changing brakes on a mk6 yet these brakes last a long time
Brake wear is highly dependent on driving (braking) style. I will not claim any universal authority or wisdom on the subject, other than to say that I have always been hard on pads and rotors. None of my cars in over 30 years has fared any worse or better than the VW in this regard - beit US, Japan or european-made vehicles. I messed around with lining composition optimized for seasonal temperature ranges, used different brands and quality - from the $15 "value-priced" to the Premium-Extreme-Racing grade and heavy-duty sets destined for taxi and police-pack vehicles.

Oh, the lovely smell of superheated asbestos in the morning... light billowing smoke rising from the front fender and wheel well... brushing away graphite-coloured soot from mags...

'Goes without saying, I have also left a lot of rubber on the bitumen and I have therefore spent a lot on shoes. A typical brake pad will usually last me anywhere between 15,000 and 25,000 Kms . I know that "normal" people can and do get 50 or 60 thousand klics out of their braking system if not more and it's OK, really; but understand that for adrenaline junkies, pushing Gs is almost as thrilling as pulling them.

In my experience, one or two semi-emergency slowdowns from high speed to an almost complete stop will invariably draw months of life from even the toughest compounds.
 

sgoldste01

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Maybe he is just changing to some pads that don't suck. The special tool for the rear brakes isn't required, but it makes life sooo much easier. and yes bleeding the brakes every few years with some quality fluid. Especially if you are tough on brakes
Don't our MK6 cars need DOT4? I don't have the owner's manual in front of me, but I'm confident this is something we don't have to buy at the dealer for 2x to 3x the price (vs. the coolant we use, which I think does need to come from the dealer).
 

Savageman69

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Brake wear is highly dependent on driving (braking) style. I will not claim any universal authority or wisdom on the subject, other than to say that I have always been hard on pads and rotors. None of my cars in over 30 years has fared any worse or better than the VW in this regard - beit US, Japan or european-made vehicles. I messed around with lining composition optimized for seasonal temperature ranges, used different brands and quality - from the $15 "value-priced" to the Premium-Extreme-Racing grade and heavy-duty sets destined for taxi and police-pack vehicles.

Oh, the lovely smell of superheated asbestos in the morning... light billowing smoke rising from the front fender and wheel well... brushing away graphite-coloured soot from mags...

'Goes without saying, I have also left a lot of rubber on the bitumen and I have therefore spent a lot on shoes. A typical brake pad will usually last me anywhere between 15,000 and 25,000 Kms . I know that "normal" people can and do get 50 or 60 thousand klics out of their braking system if not more and it's OK, really; but understand that for adrenaline junkies, pushing Gs is almost as thrilling as pulling them.

In my experience, one or two semi-emergency slowdowns from high speed to an almost complete stop will invariably draw months of life from even the toughest compounds.
Wow 15-20,000 kms is horrible lol...You realize you drive a wagon right and not a race car lol....Crap im in my mid 20s and my brakes last forever but i didnt buy a 140 hp diesel to win races if i wanted to be boy racer id have a honda or a mustang
 

sgoldste01

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When bleeding the brake/clutch hydraulic lines (every 2 years), what quantity of fluid should I have on hand to do this job? Is 1 liter enough?
 

jasong70

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DC
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Ya well, you're in Montreal....and we all know how the Montrealais drive.

PS: I appreciate the driving style allot more than the style in L'outaouais. It's like people are asleep at the wheel.


Brake wear is highly dependent on driving (braking) style. I will not claim any universal authority or wisdom on the subject, other than to say that I have always been hard on pads and rotors. None of my cars in over 30 years has fared any worse or better than the VW in this regard - beit US, Japan or european-made vehicles. I messed around with lining composition optimized for seasonal temperature ranges, used different brands and quality - from the $15 "value-priced" to the Premium-Extreme-Racing grade and heavy-duty sets destined for taxi and police-pack vehicles.

Oh, the lovely smell of superheated asbestos in the morning... light billowing smoke rising from the front fender and wheel well... brushing away graphite-coloured soot from mags...

'Goes without saying, I have also left a lot of rubber on the bitumen and I have therefore spent a lot on shoes. A typical brake pad will usually last me anywhere between 15,000 and 25,000 Kms . I know that "normal" people can and do get 50 or 60 thousand klics out of their braking system if not more and it's OK, really; but understand that for adrenaline junkies, pushing Gs is almost as thrilling as pulling them.

In my experience, one or two semi-emergency slowdowns from high speed to an almost complete stop will invariably draw months of life from even the toughest compounds.
 

bsalbrig

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Oct 13, 2004
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Siler City, NC; Woodbridge, VA
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I've not looked at the calipers on mine yet. As others have said, the pads wear very little and should last well over 40K miles.

After replacing the rear sway bar, I'll put money on it that the caliper bolts are 12 point or triple square variety. Not sure of this, but that could cause a snafu if you elect to do them yourself.

Both Major Auto Parts stores in Webster have the needed caliper piston tool. If you've never used one, ask for a demo and I am sure someone can show you.
They are on there with a torx bit. I had to take mine off to add some anti-squeal to the back of the pads at around 80k. Even at 80k the pads were still like new....I may get 200k+ with my driving style.

The brakes take a special thin viscosity fluid. I have only heard of the factory fluid and ATE. Motive Products is the cheapest place I have found it ATE SL.6. I have the motive bleeder and am about to get 5-6 containers of it to do all the family cars that require this new fluid.
 
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sgoldste01

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Thanks for the tips. How much is required to bleed the fluid on one car? Is 1 liter enough?
 

bsalbrig

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You want to have too much and what you dont use if opened is unusable. The motive bleeder is a good tool to have; I wouldn't attempt the job without one. I would get at least 2L to do the job, pour them into the bleeder to sit for a few hours to let air settle out. You probably could get the job done on 1L per car but because of the ESP system any bubbles will cause erratic performance.
 

sgoldste01

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I was reading some reviews of the Motive bleeder, and saw several people say that they prefer to use the Motive only for pressurizing the system, but that they don't put the new brake fluid into the Motive itself. They say that clean up and dirt contamination is more problematic than if you instead pour the fluid directly into the master reservoir, keeping an eye on the level, and adding more fluid as necessary.

Read the first two customer reviews on this page:

http://www.amazon.com/Motive-0100-E...TF8&coliid=I322UPE5ZNGDN7&colid=3SA9YVHS3XUKJ

What are your thoughts of this approach? For those of you who put the fluid directly into the Motive, how do you ensure that it's clean for the next time you use it?
 

bsalbrig

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I'm sure it would work fine either way. I have only used mine with fluid in the bleeder. Brake fluid is water soluable; a little water and some simple green will clean it up like new.
 
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