Korean Sportwagen?

lrpavlo

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2000
Location
Cocoa FL
TDI
09 Sportwagen DSG, 02 NB Auto
I love driving my sportwagen, I love the pass thru so I can put paddles up the center, I love that it is low for putting paddle boards on it, I love the torque! Buttt, the Kia has the seats, the 10/100 warranty is sure nice! Much cheaper to maintain, better dealership! iF the sport space came here, I for one would certainly look!
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
I suspect if the Kia wagon comes here, it will be slushbox only.
 

Armourbl

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 18, 2016
Location
Phoenix
TDI
2012 Golf TDI 4DR
I like what they are showing. Seems well thought out, even if it is more or less a copy of the VW. I personally like the white. I also like the obviously thought they put into the small details like the roof rack storage in the cargo area.

I wonder if they will offer it with the turbo charged engine they currently offer in the sedan version.

ben
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
We won't get it anytime soon. It does look decent, except for the chunky rear end and phony plastic fender vents. Classy.
 
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ATR

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jun 18, 2005
Location
Baltimore
TDI
2011 Golf TDI 6MT
My next door neighbor has the previous generation Optima. Bad part is the paint quality is pretty bad. Clear coat is beginning to flake up front from doad grit and such. My car has very little in the way of paint damage and I have a car that's twice the age of that kia.

It's a good car. Just not quite to the fit and finish of a VW.
 

peytah

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 27, 2009
Location
Seattle, WA
TDI
2010 JSW TDI, 6 sp manual, Pano roof, lifted
If Kia offered this in the US, I would likely just ship. Especially after all the emissions shenanigans. Probably great for the $ and dat warranty.
 

dnslater

Active member
Joined
Jan 29, 2015
Location
Indianapolis
TDI
2013 Sportwagen TDI
One of the great features of wagons is rear visibility. Kia followed the trend I hate in modern sedans by raising the cowl for styling reasons so the rear side window is almost useless. Otherwise I like it. Nice interior.

VW is one of the few that has maintained a low belt-line on their wagons and SUV's.
 

cobra390t

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2012
Location
NC
TDI
06 VW Jetta BRM 5SPD ,2005 Passat TDI Wagon( SOLD ), 05 Mk4 Golf BEW , 04 MK4 Golf BEW , MPG Who cares It's a Diesel
it's pro great for the Value on the $ with no emission issues , they even got the interior right
 

20IndigoBlue02

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 22, 2001
Location
Was North NJ, now SoCal
TDI
2002 Golf TDI-- deceased
I see no resemblance to the JSW, other than it has 4 doors, 4 wheels, and a hatch.

But, KIA's head designer did come from VW/Audi (TT, A6, A3, New Beetle, MKV Golf, Eos)
 

GetMore

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2003
Location
Patterson, New York
TDI
1997 Passat TDI, 2010 Jetta Sportwagen
It was an interesting game in Korea, trying to figure out what car they had copied. Just about all of them were copies of something else.
 

cowgirlkaboom

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Location
Everywhere, Oregon
TDI
2011 Golf
Do not want. I bought a Kia Rio for my ex. When it came time to replace the rear brakes I was quoted $1200by the dealer and this didn't even require new calipers. I looked into getting it done at the various generic muffler shops and they said they couldn't do it due to some special tool being required. I eventually tracked down all the parts and tools from Napa and Kia and it totaled $900, so I traded it in. I think the last time I spent $1200 on brakes as in the Bay area on my Audi TT. Maybe they are better now but that really ruined my opinion of Kia and makes me think of any Kia as a disposable car.
 

frugality

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Sep 19, 2003
Location
Spring Lake, Michigan
TDI
none, 2016 GTI
It won't be right until they offer it with 3 pedals.
And a crank in front, and snap-in windows, and a choke knob on the dash, and mechanical timing advance lever on the steering wheel.

When even supercars and other high-end sports cars are coming with dual-clutch automatics exclusively......that might be the handwriting on the wall that manual transmissions are becoming antiquated technology, and that 'driver's cars' have extra paddles, not extra pedals.
 

Purch

Veteran Member
Joined
May 10, 2011
Location
Uxbridge, Ont.
TDI
2013 Golf TDI 6spd
And a crank in front, and snap-in windows, and a choke knob on the dash, and mechanical timing advance lever on the steering wheel.

When even supercars and other high-end sports cars are coming with dual-clutch automatics exclusively......that might be the handwriting on the wall that manual transmissions are becoming antiquated technology, and that 'driver's cars' have extra paddles, not extra pedals.
Not all of us are lazy people that just want a car to go from A to B. Some of us actually like to DRIVE our cars, not have our cars drive us. I will never buy an automatic. If that requires me to drive a base car with no bells or whistles, so be it.


Butchered by autocorrect on my SG5 using Tapatalk
 

dmarsingill

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2011
Location
Dacula, GA
TDI
2011 Sportwagen Turned in , 2000 Z3 Coupe, 2003 Ford Expedition
And a crank in front, and snap-in windows, and a choke knob on the dash, and mechanical timing advance lever on the steering wheel.

When even supercars and other high-end sports cars are coming with dual-clutch automatics exclusively......that might be the handwriting on the wall that manual transmissions are becoming antiquated technology, and that 'driver's cars' have extra paddles, not extra pedals.
I have a DSG and I disagree. Only in America is the manual a minority. It is pure laziness. Yes dual clutch shifts faster, but it still doesn't give you the control that a manual can give you if used correctly. The TDi is my wifes(she can drive a manual), it was the only acceptable color available within 200 miles when we bought our car. The only manuals we could find were white and toffee. In general, we only get manuals. We have only owned 2 autos between us....the TDi and the Expedition.

Donald
 

frugality

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Sep 19, 2003
Location
Spring Lake, Michigan
TDI
none, 2016 GTI
I currently drive a manual, but it's more of a cost thing than a 'driver control' thing. $1100 more for the DSG plus the fluid changes is a consideration. For a slushbox, there are still a few fluid changes to do, and usually the lifespan is shorter than a manual. From a purely economics standpoint, the manual is the more economical choice.

However, if I drive other people's automatic cars, or rental cars, I don't find myself lacking anything. I'm not missing this luddite 'driving experience' thing. I don't think driving a manual is somehow a more 'pure' or even 'control-able' driving experience.

I once forgot to set my parking brake, with the shifter in neutral. I got out of the car and walked away. The parking ramp had just enough incline that apparently the car started rolling after I turned and walked away. Bam. Car hit a police officer's personal car on the other side of the parking ramp. $2500 body shop work. That one accident was more costly than a DSG and a few fluid changes.

And although I'm very proficient with a manual, I've still stalled my TDI on rare occasions. It happened a lot early on, as it did for a lot of us coming off of ALH or PD TDIs. Those pulled strongly at idle. The CR TDIs are tuned to idle with so little fuel that they the car doesn't have nearly the same torque right off idle. Many of us 'skilled, experienced, hairy-chested manual-transmission-driving manly-men' were shamed by the number of stalls, especially early on. It still happens on rare occasions -- for me, usually at the start of summer when the A/C is on and I forget that I've got to slip the clutch a bit more with the A/C load. Occasionally, because of some hurry-up situation at an intersection (i.e., someone insisting that you go rather than them just taking their right-of-way and getting done with it), I've stalled due to getting thrown out of rhythm.

As far as I know, you can't stall a DSG. (Only seen a few instances on here, due to mechanical issues.) And it won't roll away on you, either.

I'm on the fence as to whether my next car will be a manual or an auto. There are advantages and disadvantages to both.

But I will repeat my sarcasm here: Manual transmissions are crude technology that are on their way out.

America has abundance, which is why we prefer automatics. Much of the rest of the world has manuals because of 2 things: Cheapness (esp. the developing world), and fuel taxes. The fuel savings in manuals has historically been the big driver in people buying manual transmissions. And since it's so ingrained in them, they don't know how to drive automatics. It's funny. I hosted a coworker from Bulgaria, and he was terrified of driving an automatic. "How do you do it?!" I figured I'd better ride with him from Hertz, and he proceeded to 2-foot it, screeching to a halt with a left-foot braking.

Folks who like their retro technology (are you listening to LP's right now, getting up and flipping discs every 25 minutes?) like to give the example of the rest of the world driving manuals, but the rest of the world is switching to automatics. It wasn't that they were against them, it's just that they were cost-prohibitive. As affluence raises and the cost of the technology decreases, Europe and the developing world much prefer just 2 pedals, and automatic sales are rising quickly.

Except for those with wistful notions that somehow you're a better driver and get a better driving experience in a manual.

The manual transmission is the appendix or the tailbone of the body of a car.
 
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peytah

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 27, 2009
Location
Seattle, WA
TDI
2010 JSW TDI, 6 sp manual, Pano roof, lifted
I've got as much love for the manuals (and gonads) as anyone, but we're obviously the minority and I think we'll have even fewer manual options in the future. So what to do...? Gotta compromise somewhere. Reliable car that fills needs and gets good mileage and does the shifting, or give up something else to row my own? Reliability, warranty, performance, availability, space, not bargain basement trim level? No thanks.

If VW makes it worth my while to stay in the family when the buybacks happen, I'm interested in a GSW TSI S 5 sp, but I'm not holding my breath. Every other option that appeals to me means an automatic. I'll live.
 
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