Just Bought Used TDI that was low on oil. Need some advice about getting motor flushed and as clean as possible.

hskrdu

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Oct 17, 2003
Location
Maryland and New England
TDI
2003 Golf GLS 4D 5M, 2015 GSW SE 6M
Personally I guess I am just glad that we all get to choose what we do to our own vehicles and I for one am not going to cheap out and stretch that oil as far as I possibly can, just because its theoretically possible. I would rather "introduce" fresh clean oil as often as is reasonably possible :) Instead of relying on ash and soot and other burned up elements to soften up our oil and increase its lubricity when we could just put in fresh oil and "know" its clean and lubricating properly :) To each there own :)
Some more digging through the last 20 years of relevant posts may reveal that rather than "cheapening out" by following the recommended 10k OCI, your "fresh clean oil" is introducing more wear during its "fresh clean" stage, than it is over the last 5k of use. If you are even remotely interested in going by more than a gut feeling, feel free to click on and read the post I quoted from DBW above, as well as research and read the associated content. "Theoretically possible" refers to theory, rather than the tested and proven results I am referring to. In the end, I'd suggest that non-theoretical results indicate the 10k OCI, in many TDI situations, is changing the oil early. Yes, to each their own.
 

Ford Guy

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2021
Location
Colorado
TDI
2006 Jetta 4dr
he data sheet for 8008 says "meets, exceeds and is suitable for use" and lists 505.01.. By contrast, Liqui-Moly Top Tec 4100 lists 505.01 as one of its "Approvals". Correct me if you see something different, but I think that indicates that the Schaeffer oil does not have the VW 505.01 approval.
Meets and exceeds would very much show factory approval for the oil or they would not print it on the bottle, because either way it makes them accountable for its use as a 505.01 oil. So the fact that it is stated on the bottle makes it more approved then the T6 Rotella that 1/3+ of this forum uses in there TDI's that is in no way mentioned on the bottle and the Schaeffer is without question a superior oil anyways, so.... your point?

And for reals, I am curious, why all the hate? I am just asking questions as a new member and being attacked from every angle simply because I am trying to find the best oil for my car in my use in my climate and altitude?
 

Ford Guy

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2021
Location
Colorado
TDI
2006 Jetta 4dr
Some more digging through the last 20 years of relevant posts may reveal that rather than "cheapening out" by following the recommended 10k OCI, your "fresh clean oil" is introducing more wear during its "fresh clean" stage, than it is over the last 5k of use. If you are even remotely interested in going by more than a gut feeling, feel free to click on and read the post I quoted from DBW above, as well as research and read the associated content. "Theoretically possible" refers to theory, rather than the tested and proven results I am referring to. In the end, I'd suggest that non-theoretical results indicate the 10k OCI, in many TDI situations, is changing the oil early. Yes, to each their own.
I guess im just more inclined to find a decent roller lifter camshaft for this car rather then play all these ridiculous imported oil games because of the flat tappets. With such a large fan base for this motor im sure someone somewhere has had the intelligence to make a decent roller lifter camshaft and eliminate completely the need for all this jumping through hoops :) That and "Americanize" it as much as I can with a small dry sump oiler for the turbo bearing and a remote oil filter with a decent sized filter on it with additional oil capacity and this thing may just go a million miles with very little effort and get way better mileage without all that valve spring pressure that would no longer be necessary :) Either that, or ill just change the oil and go on my merry way :)
 

DivineChaos

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2019
Location
gets cold here
TDI
mk6 jetta sportwagen tdi
What we're stating is the 10,000 mile oil change interval is excessive. In Europe 20,000 miles is standard for these cars and 30,000 is still acceptable. You are literally just wasting your money and putting your engine through things that doesn't need to be put through. These oils are designed very differently from the oils you are used to. But it's your money, if you want to waste it and harm your engine so be it.. there has been oil analysis done every 5,000 miles on these cars by a few people. And it's shown that 20,000 miles is extremely acceptable oil change interval the only reason why we don't have it here is because we don't have the oil viscosity sensor in our cars. And because us Americans are so used to 3,000 mi oil change intervals. It is excessive. I would understand if you're constantly towing a heavy load. But you are on the highway over 80% of the time. I myself have sent in my oil at 10,000 miles, and they stated I could easily get another 1 0,000 out of it. But I digress.
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
I guess im just more inclined to find a decent roller lifter camshaft for this car rather then play all these ridiculous imported oil games because of the flat tappets.
I don't see the logic in attempting to re-invent the cylinder head design instead of spending a few extra dollars on the correct oil. The Pumpe Deuse engines were only made by VW for a few years, reportedly because they didn't want to pay Bosch for the common rail tech they ended up with eventually anyway. Despite that, cam systems can last a long time if the correct oil is used. Just to reiterate, the best oil for your car is a 5w40 that holds a VW 505.01 approval. With that oil the cam system can easily last hundreds of thousands of miles.
 

ZippyNH

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2015
Location
Southern NH
TDI
2015 JETTA TDI SE
Know it's been said before....
Even recently changed oil in a TDI is black... honestly, most every Diesel is similar.
Change it, watch the level, and drive...
Tip..the oil is DIFFERENT than gasoline oils in most cases, so don't use your regular brand.
Check the threads, pick a new brand that meets your cars needs based on year, emissions, etc....
 

UhOh

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 24, 2014
Location
PNW
TDI
2000 & 2003 Golf GLS
I don't see the logic in attempting to re-invent the cylinder head design instead of spending a few extra dollars on the correct oil. The Pumpe Deuse engines were only made by VW for a few years, reportedly because they didn't want to pay Bosch for the common rail tech they ended up with eventually anyway. Despite that, cam systems can last a long time if the correct oil is used. Just to reiterate, the best oil for your car is a 5w40 that holds a VW 505.01 approval. With that oil the cam system can easily last hundreds of thousands of miles.
OP, listen to ^^^! Not only does he know these cars, he is a major parts vendor for these (and a lot of other diesels). My life has been made a lot better because I listened to people like him!

When VW put out the maintenance intervals that was... YEARS ago. Oils, basic oils, have improved a lot. But, in the case of your engine you MUST comply with the spec- no "might be compatible" or "it's high-end oil so it IS good" apply here.

Best would have been if you'd have taken a baseline BEFORE doing anything. When I got my car I sent an oil sample off to the lab in order to get an idea of its engine's health. My engine, though it looked like it was mixed in with retrieved sunken treasure, was in excellent health. I'll note that it had 5k mile intervals changes with high-end (appropriately spec'd) oil. Previous owner shelled out WAY more than necessary; but, I am thankful for it; read: "if you want to do a future buyer a service then shell out more than is necessary!" (but, it's unlikely you're going to be able to recoup that extra expense, especially on our cars which are getting way up their in age). For over 100k miles I've been running a mid-grade oil in my TDI (ALH motor; more forgiving), as well as in the wife's TDIs (she's had two of them now) as well as a ton of other diesels I have, and everything continues to work flawlessly. My car just hit 220k miles, and had managed 800+ mile and 55+mpg tanks in 5 of its last 6 fill-ups.

My truck mechanic (for my 12V Cummins) has a BEW [I believe] TDI. Currently about 180k miles. It's his wife's car. Because he's a high-performance guy (doing compound turbos on all the folks' trucks out here in the hinterlands) he HAD to tweak that car. Raced it for one season. 7 lb flywheel. Waste-gated turbo: he'd gotten up to 53 lbs of boost, but after blowing up 3 turbos he decided to hold back to 35 lbs. The bottom end AND the cam(!) are still stock. A point to be had here is that VW TDIs are extremely tough engines, there's no need to handle them with kid gloves, to use super fancy oils and such.
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
The Shell, Schaeffer, and Mobil/Delvac 5w40 oils are all great oils for your PD TDI. Dumping any of them at 5k miles is just a waste unless you're regularly towing through sandstorms in Death Valley, or tracking the car. But deeply engrained misconceptions are hard to overcome. Whatever lets you sleep easy.
 

billc508

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2017
Location
boston ma
TDI
2015 golf sportwagen
Hello, I am not a world wizard expert on vw diesel but I have owned four of them and run a number of over the road diesels and marine craft also with diesel and also a diesel engine tank in the service so here is two cents worth. Any possible damage that might have occurred or excess wear has already happened so nothing will restore any of that. If your car runs good and your mileage is pretty good and no horrible sounds when you accelerate then you are likely in good shape, Doing a few oil change at 5K is good insurance and can't hurt, however. Most of the discussion centers around oil but as you are running synthetic oil made for diesels then it is really the additive package that should have some thought. There are a number of chemicals that make up the additive package in the oil that enables it to perform as it should. You have viscosity index improvers that make the oil useable over a range of temps so 5W oil base can give the necessary 30 or 40W viscosity at running temp. You have anti foaming and anti corrosive compounds and a number or others without which the oil will revert to the base number and will not give the lubricating quality it is supposed to do. Which is why a filter only change is not so hot of an idea. You need the oil change to restore the additive package which will break down over time and degrade performance. It's true that synthetics do not break down in the same way that mineral oils do but it is the additive package that makes it perform as a multi grade oil, if the additives deplete then you will have a synthetic product but it will not give you multi grade performance and the result will be severe wear. Also there are by products of combustion such as some soot and ash residuals that diesel oil is dsigned to hold in suspension to prevent coking up the system. Changing the oil flushes these contaminants out of your system so they are not rolling around in there taking up volume and not providing lubrication. Filters too are self sacrificing, they degrade over time by doing their job of trapping particulates but the more they trap the less efficient they are. Oil analysis can tell you how much contamination is picked up and if there are signs of severe wear if you choose to go that path. I personally don't do that with my diesel cars, I do change the oil a little more often however because it suits my comfort level and I routinely put 200 to 300 thousand on them before I replace. Just some things to think about.
 
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