Is it worth it?

rgolka

New member
Joined
Feb 13, 2024
Location
Calgary
TDI
2009 Jetta
I have. 2009 Jetta TDI with 260K km on it.

The other day I was driving and battery light came on, then power steering light and then it died.

Towed to dealership, they told me the serpentine belt snapped and my alternator had seized. It is an older car and not sure if I wanted to fix it so had it towed back to my house.

I attempted to get in to my car this evening and the power locks don't work, no lights come on in interior when opened the door and the release switch for fuel tank cover doesn't even work.

I'm guessing that my battery has been drained due to the alternator....????

Could this be a bigger issue than just having to replace belt, alternator and potentially a battery?
 

Tdijarhead

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Location
Lawrenceville PA
TDI
2003 TDI Jetta Daughters Car, 2001 TDI Beetle, Wife’s car, 2005 Golf TDI Mine, all 5 spds
Sounds like a belt and alternator for sure. Maybe a battery depending on if it will still hold a charge after being drained.
 

rgolka

New member
Joined
Feb 13, 2024
Location
Calgary
TDI
2009 Jetta
Yeah, it's been a couple days sitting there. So doubt the battery will come back.

Is it worthwhile to fix?
 

pedroYUL

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2011
Location
MI, USA
TDI
2015 Passat CVCA; 2015 GSW CRUA; 2012 wagon CJAA; 2004 wagon BEW
If you are handy (like Red Green) get an alternator pulley (maybe from @Mozambiquer ), belt and charge the battery. But I would first see if the serp belt got caught by the timing belt...in that case that engine might be done.

Alternator pulley seizing are super common, that doesn't mean the alternator is bad.
 

MrCypherr

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Location
Ontario
TDI
Mk6 Wagon
The cost compared to getting another car vs fixing it should tell you right there. If you can do it yourself, even better. I know it all depends on the situation but I feel like alot of the time fixing the car is cheaper than buying another car and fixing the problems that car has as well. Especially since this is a easier fix.
 
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rgolka

New member
Joined
Feb 13, 2024
Location
Calgary
TDI
2009 Jetta
If you are handy (like Red Green) get an alternator pulley (maybe from @Mozambiquer ), belt and charge the battery. But I would first see if the serp belt got caught by the timing belt...in that case that engine might be done.

Alternator pulley seizing are super common, that doesn't mean the alternator is bad.

Thank you. Yes not handy, just a mom who doesn't know these things and trying to not get duped and needs something reliable. The dealership didn't say anything about the timing belt. If I had a mechanic come to my place to look at it would they be able to assess the timing belt situation?
 

MrCypherr

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Location
Ontario
TDI
Mk6 Wagon
Looking at the timing belt to see if it got caught is pretty simple. Just remove the top timing belt cover and you should be able to see where and if it got caught. If you dont see any pieces, another method would be manually turning the engine over by hand to see if it stops. If the timing belt is fine and no pieces got caught in there, then all you would need is the serp belt, alternator pulley.
 

pedroYUL

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2011
Location
MI, USA
TDI
2015 Passat CVCA; 2015 GSW CRUA; 2012 wagon CJAA; 2004 wagon BEW
Thank you. Yes not handy, just a mom who doesn't know these things and trying to not get duped and needs something reliable. The dealership didn't say anything about the timing belt. If I had a mechanic come to my place to look at it would they be able to assess the timing belt situation?
Any mechanic worth their name would be able to tell if the serpentine belt got sucked into the timing belt path, specially if you mention it.

But before you call anybody, perhaps the cheapest way (start by avoiding the dealership, although when I was in Quebec I must say dealers were way better than around me now), get an alternator pulley from vendor @Mozambiquer , the mechanic will need a special tool to get that replaced. A new serp belt, and a charge of the battery, and you should be able to get back on the road.
 

pedroYUL

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2011
Location
MI, USA
TDI
2015 Passat CVCA; 2015 GSW CRUA; 2012 wagon CJAA; 2004 wagon BEW
Also, 260k km on these cars is nothing. I had a 2004 wagon which I bought with 80k km, it is now with my brother down in Florida with around 440k km.
 

MrCypherr

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Location
Ontario
TDI
Mk6 Wagon
Yeah if taken care of and the body is in good shape, 240k km is on the low end. Mine has rolled 350k km and runs like a dream like it has 80k on it. Just keep up on the maintenance and if it needs anything, replace it then and there and dont wait too long cause other things may need replacing as well.
 
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IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
If you like the car you should get it repaired and keep it. The issues you have are minor. And as others have posted, 260K clicks is nothing in these cars.

Keep in mind that the dealer is by far the most expensive option for repairs. If there's an independent shop there that works on VWs they can fix what's broken on your car. The issues aren't specific to a TDI, so it doesn't matter if they're diesel specialists or not. And they will probably get you better pricing on the alternator and battery, if needed.
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
I'd probably get it fixed and then trade it in on something more reliable. The '09 TDIs had the biggest problem with hpfp failures, which are tremendously expensive to repair out of warranty. Same with the emissions components.
 

MrCypherr

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Location
Ontario
TDI
Mk6 Wagon
Unless they want to put the money into doing a CP3 pump conversion or if they had issues before and its been changed to the updated one.
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
I don't know why you would think the '09s are more prone to HPFP failures. The pumps are all the same.
 

MrCypherr

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Location
Ontario
TDI
Mk6 Wagon
The 09's to early 2011 (I think) had known bad batches of the HPFPs. VW Germany knew about this and anything produced after Late 2011-Early 2012 had the superseded HPFP which where "better".
 

turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
I don't know why you would think the '09s are more prone to HPFP failures. The pumps are all the same.
I thought that was common knowledge here on the forum. VW had Bosch make revisions to the wear coatings and internal clearances on the CP4.1 due to the high failure rates on the early commonrails.
 
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Bob S.

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 17, 2006
Location
Central MD.
TDI
A B4V, some ALHs & BRMs
Wise counsel is offered above on first determining if remnants of the Serpentine (S) belt entered into the Timing (T) belt (typically happens via the gap at the lower cover. When S belt remnants enter into the T belt area, it can cause the Crank shaft/Cam Shaft/injection pump to skip proper timing.

You wrote: "...driving and battery light came on, then power steering light and then it died." A simple S belt failure would explain the battery light (alternator not charging), but not the engine to "die". A T belt timing issue would explain that.

In response to your question: "Could this be a bigger issue than just having to replace belt, alternator and potentially a battery?'

Skipped timing can be relatively minor (rare). Or, it can result in valve to piston contact with possible/probable internal engine damage the extent of which will depend upon how much the T belt timing skipped. The cam shafts in the CR engines are said not to be a rugged as earlier TDI engines. Many have reported the need to also replace cam shafts when replacing bent values.

Occasionally, one is lucky and repairs are as simple as replacing the T belt, retiming the system installing a new S belt and alternator. Sometimes, it is major engine work with many variables in-between.

You would be well served to get the car looked at by a trusted, and knowledgeable TDI mechanic familiar with the Common Rail engine used in the typical NA TDI.

If you do end up having to go into the timing belt, IMO & experience, it is well worth the investment to install the reduced clearance lower timing belt cover in an attempt to prevent any future S belt entry into the T belt area. The part is available from many of the trusted TDI parts suppliers or from https://whitbreadperformance.com/products/common-rail-tdi-lower-timing-belt-cover

Best of luck with it.
 

CanadianALH

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2023
Location
Canada
TDI
2002 Jetta 5spd 2006 Jetta DSG (wifes)
Wise counsel is offered above on first determining if remnants of the Serpentine (S) belt entered into the Timing (T) belt (typically happens via the gap at the lower cover. When S belt remnants enter into the T belt area, it can cause the Crank shaft/Cam Shaft/injection pump to skip proper timing.

You wrote: "...driving and battery light came on, then power steering light and then it died." A simple S belt failure would explain the battery light (alternator not charging), but not the engine to "die". A T belt timing issue would explain that.

In response to your question: "Could this be a bigger issue than just having to replace belt, alternator and potentially a battery?'

Skipped timing can be relatively minor (rare). Or, it can result in valve to piston contact with possible/probable internal engine damage the extent of which will depend upon how much the T belt timing skipped. The cam shafts in the CR engines are said not to be a rugged as earlier TDI engines. Many have reported the need to also replace cam shafts when replacing bent values.

Occasionally, one is lucky and repairs are as simple as replacing the T belt, retiming the system installing a new S belt and alternator. Sometimes, it is major engine work with many variables in-between.

You would be well served to get the car looked at by a trusted, and knowledgeable TDI mechanic familiar with the Common Rail engine used in the typical NA TDI.

If you do end up having to go into the timing belt, IMO & experience, it is well worth the investment to install the reduced clearance lower timing belt cover in an attempt to prevent any future S belt entry into the T belt area. The part is available from many of the trusted TDI parts suppliers or from https://whitbreadperformance.com/products/common-rail-tdi-lower-timing-belt-cover

Best of luck with it.
The serpentine belt breaking off and hitting the timing belt is rare but I do know a guy it happened to. Take the cover off and see if it has signs it jumping.
 
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turbobrick240

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Location
maine
TDI
2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
It doesn't sound like the OP is likely to be turning wrenches on her car. I think she'd probably be better served by driving a vehicle with simpler drivetrain and maintenance requirements.
 

Mozambiquer

Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Location
Versailles Missouri
TDI
2004 VW Touareg V10 TDI, 2012 Audi Q7 V6 TDI, 1998 VW Jetta TDI. 1982 VW Rabbit pickup, 2001 VW Jetta TDI, 2005 VW Passat wagon TDI X3, 2001 VW golf TDI, 1980 VW rabbit pickup,

BeauDaugherty

Active member
Joined
Feb 15, 2024
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USA
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2012 Volkswagen Tiguan 2.0 TDI BlueMotion Tech Sport SUV 5dr Diesel
Considering how old your car is and how much you've driven it, you need to think about whether fixing it is worth the money compared to what the car is worth and what you need from a car in the future. Fixing the serpentine belt, alternator, and maybe the battery isn't too complicated, but it will cost you some money.
 

IndigoBlueWagon

TDIClub Enthusiast, Principal IDParts, Vendor , w/
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
South of Boston
TDI
'97 Passat, '99.5 Golf, '02 Jetta Wagon, '15 GSW
Considering how old your car is and how much you've driven it, you need to think about whether fixing it is worth the money compared to what the car is worth and what you need from a car in the future. Fixing the serpentine belt, alternator, and maybe the battery isn't too complicated, but it will cost you some money.
Maybe, but trading a broken car is going to cost, too. The OP won't get much money for it in its current condition. Better to fix and then sell, or fix, drive it for a while and sell in a few months or a year.
 

MrCypherr

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Location
Ontario
TDI
Mk6 Wagon
Comparing the cost to a new(er) car, depending on what you find, and what that car needs for it to be in proper order, as maintenance or safety related, could be more than what the repair is. Or, if you are buying from a dealership/Small car lot, the payments may not even be close to worth it and youll be spending more especially on interest. Seeing you're in Calgary, it would be around 7-9% I'd assume, Same as here in Ontario.
 
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BeauDaugherty

Active member
Joined
Feb 15, 2024
Location
USA
TDI
2012 Volkswagen Tiguan 2.0 TDI BlueMotion Tech Sport SUV 5dr Diesel
Anyway, the OP won't get a lot of money for selling a fixed car. As far as I know, people usually try to avoid buying cars that had some major repair work done in the past. Unless a highly qualified mechanic repairs it, another mechanic will consult a buyer.
Still, it's a bit more money than selling a broken car for spare parts.
 

MrCypherr

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Location
Ontario
TDI
Mk6 Wagon
I dont see any major work mentioned by the OP. Alternator just seems like common work at that mileage.
 
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