IDParts Complete Lower Control arms w/ TT bushings...question?

Dh4276

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2019
Location
South Carolina
TDI
2006 Golf GLS TDI, BEW
I've got the Cupra's in my rear beam. That was quite the project.


I’m doing this in less than a month from now, anything specific to anticipate? Doing the Capra R rear bushings when I change the shocks and springs all at the same time.


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KrashDH

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Location
Washington
TDI
2002 Golf
I’m doing this in less than a month from now, anything specific to anticipate? Doing the Capra R rear bushings when I change the shocks and springs all at the same time.


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Lots of info on the rear beam bushings out there. The old bushings can be a bear go get out. The right press and cups are key.


Some will remove the beam from the car, some will install with it hanging to avoid disconnecting the brake lines and having to do a bleed.


I removed it from the car knowing that I would need the flexibility to get western on it's a$$. It was tough enough with the beam out getting everything out and replaced, I wouldn't have wanted to be crawling on the floor with limited space to do it. Although since I re assembled everything with grease and installed the Cupras, I could probably tackle it under the car next time.


As well, I was due for a brake bleed so it worked out well.
Give yourself ample time to get it done. If I recall it only took me 30+ minutes to actually get the beam out from under the car.
 

Dh4276

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2019
Location
South Carolina
TDI
2006 Golf GLS TDI, BEW
Lots of info on the rear beam bushings out there. The old bushings can be a bear go get out. The right press and cups are key.


Some will remove the beam from the car, some will install with it hanging to avoid disconnecting the brake lines and having to do a bleed.


I removed it from the car knowing that I would need the flexibility to get western on it's a$$. It was tough enough with the beam out getting everything out and replaced, I wouldn't have wanted to be crawling on the floor with limited space to do it. Although since I re assembled everything with grease and installed the Cupras, I could probably tackle it under the car next time.


As well, I was due for a brake bleed so it worked out well.
Give yourself ample time to get it done. If I recall it only took me 30+ minutes to actually get the beam out from under the car.


I took a week off to do the whole suspension to make sure I wouldn’t get rushed trying to put things back together. I have no idea the last time a brake bleed was done on this car, so that might be a way to go being I’m gonna have the shocks and springs out anyways.


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jayb79

Veteran Member
Joined
May 20, 2000
Location
Exeter,NH
Be careful removing the rear brake lines from the swingarm. Make sure the nut going into the flex line is actually spinning and not twisting the metal line. Probably not as much of a problem as up here in the rust belt but I spent more time trying to get the lines to loosen without braking them than removing the axle.
 

KrashDH

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Location
Washington
TDI
2002 Golf
I got this done yesterday. Took me a total of 3 hours. And that was watching the Bruins beat up on the Redwings!

Installed the LCA assemblies with ball joints, TREs, and sway bar links. Alignment is really close still but I'll take it in to get an alignment. Ball joints were pre installed in LCA so I just covered exposed bolts with Fluid Film. Every other bolt that came out and went back in got the ole' Evinrude Triple Guard Marine grease.

Not sure if it's required for the LCAs, but I tourqued everything with the suspension loaded up.
 

sriracha

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2014
Location
805
TDI
2005 Jetta Wagon 5mt, 1982 Rabbit truck (gas)
After driving my wagon more, I still can't believe how much better the car handles with the TT bushings and HD ball joints. Just the slightest adjustment at the steering wheel and the car moves in the lane. The car is so much more responsive to input.

I'm excited to install the Cupra R rear beam bushings and see how that improves things.
 

03TDICommuter

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Location
So. Cal
TDI
01' NB, 5spd
After driving my wagon more, I still can't believe how much better the car handles with the TT bushings and HD ball joints. Just the slightest adjustment at the steering wheel and the car moves in the lane. The car is so much more responsive to input.

I'm excited to install the Cupra R rear beam bushings and see how that improves things.
Still holding up well? I'll be going through my Beetle this coming weekend. Previous owner already replaced LCA's many years ago but from the feel I think they're already toast.
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4 and the Cummins-es
Are you talking about these?
https://www.powerflexusa.com/shop/p...-tt-a3-s3-front-control-arm-rear-bushing-2841
Race vs street version is the colors I'm assuming

Looks to be a better solution than the standard poly product that's for sure. Also, looks like they could have engineered a way to accept grease into the internals as well, but they didn't.
Those be the ones, and still not making any noise or delivering anything less than connected to the road feel.

The beam axle is easy with an air hammer and a bushing splitter chisel. I scored a big rivet gun used just for that job. It is about 20 FPE per hit( an aircraft rivet gun taking .498 chisels ). Its stroke is in excess of 6". Since I was scared of the job and willing to pay some big $$ before learning how easy it actually is, the $150 spent on a 7x rivet gun was cheap in comparison...and I did not have to part with the gun like I would have just the $$ had I gone that way. I would like to try it with a big little one, like a CP715 and a .401 chisel just for comparison purposes.

On front end re-assy, pull the ball joints all the way outboard. That way any time you take it apart, they always go to the stop and you won't wreck the alignment if it has to come apart at some point.
cheers,
Douglas
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4 and the Cummins-es
Any tips? I dread having to do mine.
The bushing splitter chisel is designed for just this task. It cuts a strip out, and folds the edges of the cut inwards. It is truly a piece of cake. With mine I got about half way through and the bushing came out in one piece. I was scared-er than you, Jokila, on that you may rely. I have no more fear...LOL
cheers,
Douglas
 

Gothmolly

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Location
Providence, RI
TDI
2002 Golf
What indicates that you need to do this? My rear end ride is harsh because the rear bushings rusted solid, but how do you know if the front needs it?
 

KrashDH

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Location
Washington
TDI
2002 Golf
Any tips? I dread having to do mine.
The bushing splitter chisel is designed for just this task. It cuts a strip out, and folds the edges of the cut inwards. It is truly a piece of cake. With mine I got about half way through and the bushing came out in one piece. I was scared-er than you, Jokila, on that you may rely. I have no more fear...LOL
cheers,
Douglas
Yeah that tool would have been really handy. I ended up notching the bushing with a small body saw, then used the ole "hand chisel" and hammer to split the bushings. A couple more whacks after that it was out.

For a first timer, I personally didn't want having to fight doing it underneath the car because I hate rolling around on the ground for 1, and second, I knew I wanted room to work. It was also a good time to flush my brake fluid. So I just pulled the entire beam from the car when I did it. It may be a couple extra steps yes, but I would just time it with a brake bleed. I know I would have gotten really riled up if the first time I had to do it was under the car. If I have to do it again though. I'd likely just drop the beam though since when I installed the new bushings, lots of grease

Having it out was nice to assess what was going on and being able to take full swings at that old bushing to fully split it. As well, I purchased the notorious ebay/amazon kit that's supposed to work with the Cupra-R bushings, but if I recall correctly, during installation, one of the cups in that kit wasn't deep enough to fully receive the bushing, so I ended up having to use a cup from my wheel bearing kit to receive the last bit of it. I recall you could get it in about 90% of the way with the kit though.

Make sure that you have a set of axle beam bolts too, some people have to cut one of them out because of the direction it was installed interfering with the fuel tank I believe. Mine didn't have an issue coming out (Golf) but I had them on hand just in case, because they are tty bolts.
 

jokila

Vendor
Joined
Dec 3, 2004
Location
Houston, Texas
TDI
2003 Jetta GLS, Manual
What indicates that you need to do this? My rear end ride is harsh because the rear bushings rusted solid, but how do you know if the front needs it?
When the front control arm's rear bushing wears loose you will see it torn and the bolt sleeve flopping around in there. You can see them from outside the car behind the tire. One way you can feel it is when you apply the brakes (the faster the speed, the more you see it), the wheel will suddenly want to turn slightly because of the freeplay in the bushing.

Also, I would never get the poly bushings, too much stiffness. The TT bushing is plenty of performance and practically lasts forever. I still have mine in there after 10 years. I think the first two sets only lasted 4 years each.
 
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sriracha

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2014
Location
805
TDI
2005 Jetta Wagon 5mt, 1982 Rabbit truck (gas)
Still holding up well? I'll be going through my Beetle this coming weekend. Previous owner already replaced LCA's many years ago but from the feel I think they're already toast.
Yes! The LCA with TT bushings are holding up great! Still really happy with the upgrade and I frequently take the car out for an aggressive drive through the local two-lane roads.
 

03TDICommuter

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Location
So. Cal
TDI
01' NB, 5spd
Yes! The LCA with TT bushings are holding up great! Still really happy with the upgrade and I frequently take the car out for an aggressive drive through the local two-lane roads.
Excellent! Thanks for the feedback. This weekend I'll be doing the front struts and at that time evaluate if I need to refresh the LCAs and if so I'll be sure to pick these up.

Dave
 

PakProtector

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Location
AnnArbor, MI
TDI
Mk.4 and the Cummins-es
I got the bolts done by dropping the body mount, and then lining up the washers to the dirt circles they left. Not the best way, and for sure cutting the axle pivot bolt would have been better. And yet here we are...LOL The air hammer is of course a bigger is better thing. That 7X rivet gun is ideal; sensitive 'teasing' trigger and then huge power when opened up. I suspect a .401 CP gun would also do, and its chisel is smaller than the .498 the rivet gun takes. That pup is designed for 7/16" steel rivets...and I have absolutely no trouble believing it. The smaller chisel could actually make it easier. Tempted to try an adapter so I can plug it into the monster...or maybe I will just get a 3X gun( the biggest of the .401 shank ).
cheers,
Douglas
 
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