HOW TO: Change 2006 Jetta BRM Timing Belt

p5150

Active member
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Location
Lancaster, CA
TDI
2013 Passat SEL, 2006 Jetta (Sold)
Take my advice for what its worth. This is by no means an all-inclusive how to so dont blame me for any shortcomings. Im an ASE certified engine mechanic but my TDI experience is limited. Ive done a lot of timing belts but no TDIs before this.

Due to the lack of a good A5 how-to, I started out my timing belt with the guidance for an A4, but a few things are different. Although I have never done a A4 belt, it appears by reading other posts that an A5 is much easier.

In retrospect, I wouldnt have removed the cam/valve cover or the dual fuel/air pump. I did it because you have to for the A4. Not necessary on the A5 because you dont need to realign the cam sprocket with the camshaft. You dont need to remove the cam sprocket.

Specialty Tools REQUIRED:

Camshaft Sprocket Locking Pin - MN3359
Crankshaft Locking Tool - MNT10100
12-point INTERNAL wrenching 10mm bit (also called a tri-square)
19mm 12-point deepwell socket (for rotating crankshaft)
  1. Put the car on jackstands. Dont get under the car unless it is on jackstands. Dont be stupid, they are really cheap at Harbor Freight.
  2. Turn the steering wheel all the way to the right.
  3. Remove top engine covers, bottom engine cover and lower passenger side engine/wheelwell cover.
  4. Remove coolant overflow reservoir.
  5. Disconnect fuel filter lines running across the front of the engine. Leave the aluminum lines attached to the valve cover. Make sure to leave the other lines from the chassis connected to the filter. Remove the fuel filter mounting bolts and set it out of the way.
  6. Remove the intercooler to throttle body air duct. Plug the throttle body and intercooler pipes to keep things out.
  7. Disconnect the throttle body wire and move it out of the way.
  8. Using a 17mm open end wrench on the tab on top of the accessory belt tensioner, release the pressure on the accessory drive belt and remove it.
  9. I recommend against rotating the crankshaft counter clockwise. This puts pressure on the tensioner that it is not designed to hold. Rotate the engine only in the clockwise direction except for small (less than one tooth) adjustments while installing the belt.
  10. Use your SPECIALTY TOOL internal wrenching 12-point 10mm bit to remove the accessory belt pulley. I placed my 19mm socket with a 1/2" drive ratchet on the crank rotation bolt to hold the crank stationary while I broke the torque on the 4 bolts retaining the pulley with a 3/8" drive ratchet. If you set it up right you can just squeeze the two ratchets together to break torque and do the same for the reinstall. The pulley will come right off so dont drop it on your face.
  11. Remove the accessory belt tensioner. (2 bolts)
  12. Place a jack with some type of pad under the edge of the oil pan. I used a phone book and it worked like a champ. Support the weight of the engine with the jack. STAY OUT FROM UNDERNEATH THE ENGINE AND KEEP IN MIND THAT THE JACK COULD FAIL. DONT RELY ON THE JACK FOR SAFETY WHILE YOU WORK UNDER THE CAR.
  13. Completely remove the motor mount to include the vibration dampner on the car. (4 bolts and 2 bolts on chassis/mount tie plate) Also remove the adapter fixture on the engine. (3 bolts) Pressurize/relieve pressure on jack or move engine as necessary to take tension off bolts to aid with removal.
  14. Remove the upper timing belt cover. Using 10mm standard socket, remove the lower timing belt covers.
  15. Get a good look at the belt and how it is routed. Using the 19mm socket (1/2" drive ratchet preferred) rotate the engine CLOCKWISE (as looking at the pullies through the passenger side wheelwell).
  16. Look closely at your Crankshaft Locking Tool - MNT10100 and you will see an arrow on the face slightly offset from the top. This tells you your CRANKshaft point of #1 cyl TDC. When installed, its arrow should line up with the arrow on the crankshaft timing belt pulley. DO NOT INSTALL THE LOCKING TOOL YET
  17. The CAMshaft position determines if the CRANKshaft point of TDC is on the compression or exhaust/intake stroke. Remember that the camshaft will rotate once for every two rotations of the crankshaft. When the camshaft is correctly positioned, the locking pin will fit on the left side of the pulley (vehicle aft side) and keep it from rotating. You can always look at the back of the cam pulley to see where the hole is that goes all the way through it by checking periodically as you rotate the crank pulley. This will help you get the pin positioned correctly.
  18. Use of the MN3036 tool to hold or turn the camshaft sprocket really isnt mandatory but it helps to get the pin aligned. You can also rotate the engine with this tool. Dont attempt to rotate the engine with the camshaft sprocket bolt.
  19. Insert the camshaft sprocket locking pin once the motor is placed at #1 CYL TDC on the COMPRESSION stroke. Once the pin is installed, insert the crankshaft locking tool and verify that the arrow on the tool is aligned with the arrow on the crank timing belt sprocket. You may need to SLIGHTLY rotate the crank with your 19mm socket to get it to seat. One tooth is one tooth too many.
  20. It is also OK to put in the crank lock and then try to get in the cam pin if you are having trouble with the order of things.
  21. Once all of the locks are installed, loosen the tensioner nut and relieve the tension by rotating the tensioner cam with a 5mm allen head. I marked the old belt and cam/crank sprockets with paint and then transferred the old marks to my new belt just as a safety measure.
  22. Loosen the idler pulley nut and remove the idler pulley. The belt should come out easily now.
  23. Change the water pump.
  24. Transfer marks to new belt (optional). If you do this, ensure that you dont make a mirror image of the marks by placing the faces of the belts together. Transfer the marks by placing the back of the new belt on the face of the old one.
  25. Align tab of tensioner and install on engine. Do not tighten retention nut.
  26. Begin the install of the new timing belt. Do not pry the belt. Your optional marks should line up and the belt should at least be halfway on. You dont need to put in the idler pulley yet. Once the belt has been started, you may not be able to get it all the way on very easily. Remove the pin from the cam sprocket and the locking tool from the crank. Rotate the engine while gently pushing on the belt to feed it all the way onto the sprockets. The engine should rotate smoothly with the only resistance being the compression of the air. IF AT ANY POINT THE ENGINE FEELS AS IF YOU HAVE SOLID RESISTANCE (NOT NORMAL ENGINE COMPRESSION) YOU MUST STOP!!! Dont force it and bend a valve.
  27. FYI: If you have marked the belt, the marks will no longer align after rotation of the engine. The marks only serve for sprocket orientation during installation and should not be used for verification after the motor has been rotated.
  28. Once the belt is fed all the way on, install the idler pulley and torque to specs.
  29. Rotate the engine at least two more complete revolutions with your 19mm socket/ratchet. The engine should rotate smoothly with the only resistance being the compression of the air. With a 5mm allen wrench rotate the cam on the belt tensioner until the spring force indicator needle points in the middle of the gap. Torque to specs
  30. Continue to rotate clockwise. Stop at TDC on the compression stroke again. Re-insert the locking tools to verify that your timing is still correct. If timing is incorrect, you MUST fix it by removing the belt at this point and readjusting your cam sprocket. Chances are that if you ARE off it is only by one tooth.
  31. REMOVE LOCKING TOOLS.
  32. Install timing belt covers.
  33. Install motor mounts. Torque to specs and remove jack. i used the specs for an A4.
  34. Install accessory drive pulley. There is an alignment nipple on the face of the timing belt sprocket for the small hole in the accessory belt pulley.
  35. Install accessory drive belt tensioner and drive belt.
  36. Install fuel filter and coolant overflow bottle.
  37. Connect throttle body wire.
  38. Conduct a good tool check and start the car. If the car doesnt want to fire, take note of the sound of the electric priming pump. It runs for about 3 seconds. Turn the engine over only when the priming pump is running in order to push the air out of the system. Mine had a hard time starting so I did about 5 consecutive 3-second cranking periods with full on/off key positions and it fired right up.
  39. Fill your coolant.
  40. Reinstall undercarriage protective covers after a good leak check.
 
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p5150

Active member
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Location
Lancaster, CA
TDI
2013 Passat SEL, 2006 Jetta (Sold)
nice writeup chitty. I wish I had seen it before I typed out mine or even started the process LOL
 

chittychittybangbang

Veteran Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2007
Location
CT
TDI
a slow, smokey, and broken down one
Wow, you liked it so much you thanked me three times :) I also have a small but focused bulletin board, feel free to sign up!
 

kirkus

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2006
Location
Memphis, TN
TDI
'11 A3 S-Line TDI
Excellent!

Most helpful thing I've found on the web!:cool:
Just finished mine Friday evening. It's running like a new car.:D
Couldn't find a water pump w/ metal impeller.:confused:
Thanks a bunch!!
 
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etextdi

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2006
Location
Tx
TDI
06 jetta
How long does this take opening the hood to closing?
did mine last month,'06 BRM. first timer. have always done my own maintenance but I don't make a living at it.8 work hours. that includes water breaks,neighbor stopping to chat,unloading groceries for the wife(higher priority!). worked at a slow pace as I had plenty of time with 4 days off. without distractions prolly 6 1/2 hrs. I believe that next time could do it in 4~5 hrs. I viewed several "How To's" but used VWVortex primarily. Sorry I don't have the link but my netbook died with the link. It's included on numerous posts on this site.
 

schoolcb

Active member
Joined
Sep 27, 2011
Location
Mid Cities area of TX
TDI
2006 Jetta TDI
Awesome instructions. Did my timing belt for the first time, this was a huge help. One note though for those using the engine lift that sits over the engine (bought mine at Harbor Freight). Given the lack of room to place the feet and the rearward position it has to sit, it pulls the engine back an inch or two making that bolt that is normally accessible through the passenger side fender impossible to get to. Other than that I had no troubles.
 

philngrayce

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2004
Location
Connecticut
TDI
'02 Jetta, '06 Jetta, Both Gone '13 Leaf, Gone Liberty CRD, Subaru Forrester and MB300SD
No Vag-Com needed?

Nice wrote up, thanks.
 

arneeche

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2011
Location
Oklahoma
TDI
2006 Jetta TDI (former), 2012 Jetta TDI (Former), 2014 JSW TDI
add another successful timing belt job to the list. Went smooth and stress free thanks to the instructions you posted and the pictures from myturbodiesel.com. Thanks!!
 

Ol'Rattler

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 3, 2007
Location
PNA
TDI
2006 BRM Jetta
No Vag-Com needed?

Nice wrote up, thanks.
All though it is nice to have, you don't really need it. You can consistently get torsion within 1 unit of zero if your technique is good.

After you tension the belt, you turn the engine 2 turns in the direction of rotation, by the crankshaft bolt, until the crank pin is a slip fit.
Then you re-tension the belt if the pointer is off. After that, you loosen the three cam bolts and tweak the cam by the center bolt until the cam pin is a slip fit.

If you remove the pins and turn the engine 2 more times until the crank pin is a slip fit, the cam tool will be a slip fit and torsion will be within 1 unit of Zero, as well if you did the procedure correctly.

What you did was made the final adjustment with the belt slack in the right place and compensated for belt stretch.

As an aside, the cam and crank tools are not "lock tools", like a lot of people call them. What they are designed to do is to index the crank and cam and if used correctly they will be always be a slip fit. If you put any kind of load on them you are doing something wrong.
 

RedPepper

Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2012
Location
San Diego, CA
TDI
2006 Jetta, Red, 5-Spd
Success!!

Thanks to a great write up here and at turbodiesel.com we have another success. 7hrs two peoples first time changing one. Went pretty smooth and would have been smoother of the shop I was working at wasn't closing. Best part is my car didn't blow!
 

James & Son

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2008
Location
Maryhill, Ontario, Canada
TDI
2006 Jetta
Thanks to a great write up here and at turbodiesel.com we have another success. 7hrs two peoples first time changing one. Went pretty smooth and would have been smoother of the shop I was working at wasn't closing. Best part is my car didn't blow!
For the first timer, myturbodiesel.com write up is good. But after the first time you need Growlers check list( edit: see post 9). I also want to thank P5150 for the thread and his writeup leading to the above.
 
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keaton

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2009
Location
Mesa AZ, 85202
TDI
2005 Mk5
when I did the timing belt on my Mk2 1.8L motor I just put marks on the cam pulley, crank, and belt without putting the motor to TDC. After I got the old belt off I transferred the marks to the new belt and installed it so the marks lined up, check the timing with a gun and it was spot on.

any reason that will not work on a BRM?

this is the kit i'm looking at with a HD belt and metal pump
http://shopping.boraparts.com/product_info.php?cPath=21_28_135&products_id=316
 

turbocharged798

Veteran Member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Location
Ellenville, NY
TDI
99.5 black ALH Jetta;09 Gasser Jetta
Because its wrong and the belt won't tension properly.

Its wrong on gassers too because you have no idea if the timing was correct before hand.
 

Ol'Rattler

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 3, 2007
Location
PNA
TDI
2006 BRM Jetta
when I did the timing belt on my Mk2 1.8L motor I just put marks on the cam pulley, crank, and belt without putting the motor to TDC. After I got the old belt off I transferred the marks to the new belt and installed it so the marks lined up, check the timing with a gun and it was spot on.

any reason that will not work on a BRM?

this is the kit i'm looking at with a HD belt and metal pump http://shopping.boraparts.com/produc...roducts_id=316
Gasser are a different animal. They don't even use indexing tools. Also, on a gasser you really should use the factory recomended procedure and indexing marks because like TC798 said, you don't know if the crank to cam relationship was correct with the old belt.

On a TDI, for the smallest chance of getting it wrong, use the correct procedure and the recomended indexing tools. Chitty over on MyTurboDiesel rents those tools.

The kit you linked to would be a very good choice. All the correct quality parts and a good price. Aaron (BoraParts) is really good to work with.
 

meerschm

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Apr 18, 2009
Location
Fairfax county VA
TDI
2009 Jetta wagon DSG 08/08 205k buyback 1/8/18; replaced with 2017 Golf Wagon 4mo 1.8l CXBB
I have the tools, kit from IDI parts, have kicked my wife out of the garage ( er, asked her nice) and have the passenger side up on a jack stand. have a fender mount engine hoist as well as the floor jack.

decided to take my time and a heater hose cable remote release is on it's way. (that dude is buried pretty good)

do you think I should disconnect the battery while doing this?
 

Ol'Rattler

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 3, 2007
Location
PNA
TDI
2006 BRM Jetta
Why did you kick her out of the garage? Don't quit understand that.:confused:

Using a single jackstand is a bad idea. If the car moves at all, it will topple the jackstand and the car will fall. Use at least 2 or better yet 4.

Disconecting the battery is a VG idea whenever you are going to take apart electrical or stuff that moves.
 

CarolinaTDI14

Active member
Joined
Oct 23, 2013
Location
Havre de Grace, MD
TDI
2006 Jetta 1.9L TDI BRM
how much has it cost those of you who have not DIY'd it? I am new to owner my TDI and have never done a maintenance job this big on any vehicle I have owned. It is a bit intimidating seeing all fo the steps and not having all of the tools(locking tool, VCDS etc.) to do it. Don't ant to go to stealeership obviously and would look for a local shop in the Triad area of North Carolina...if anyone knows of such one, got two I know of.
 

Ol'Rattler

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 3, 2007
Location
PNA
TDI
2006 BRM Jetta
It isn't really all that complicated, however getting it right the first time is very important. The devil is certainly in the details.

Post the names of the 2 techs you know of, and someone will probably check in with their personal experience with those individuals or have recommendations for other techs.

If you hear the name "Prothe" or several other of the aliases he has for supplying parts, run the other way as fast as you can. He is from your neck of the woods (I think), and has destroyed many TDI's with his Chinese knock off parts.

The special tools required are not all that expensive. Actually, all you need are a crank indexing (lock) tool ($30) and a letter "A" sized drill bit (<$10) for the cam indexing tool.
 
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meerschm

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Apr 18, 2009
Location
Fairfax county VA
TDI
2009 Jetta wagon DSG 08/08 205k buyback 1/8/18; replaced with 2017 Golf Wagon 4mo 1.8l CXBB
how much has it cost those of you who have not DIY'd it? I am new to owner my TDI and have never done a maintenance job this big on any vehicle I have owned. It is a bit intimidating seeing all fo the steps and not having all of the tools(locking tool, VCDS etc.) to do it. Don't ant to go to stealeership obviously and would look for a local shop in the Triad area of North Carolina...if anyone knows of such one, got two I know of.

My local dealer provided an off the cuff answer last year of $1300.

local guru, listed here, estimated $1000, (including a few extras)

I figure my cost will be under $600, including engine fender hoist and fittings, timing belt kit, tool kit, and purchase of triple square sockets. (and the enjoyment of working on the car.)
 
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