Fuel Additive

sledhead999

Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2016
Location
UT
TDI
2004 Jetta GL TDI Auto
Is anyone running a fuel additive with ULSD for 1.9L TDI?

The reason I ask, ever since ULSD was released the 7.3L Powerstroke gurus recommend 2 stroke oil at about 100:1 ratio. This is supposed to add additional lubrication to the injectors since the sulfur is so low.

Any thoughts?
 

Bob_Fout

Oil Wanker
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Sep 5, 2004
Location
Indiana
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2003 Jetta - Alaska Green (sold) / 2015 GTI 2.0T
100:1 is a bit much. I've run 128:1 (easy to remember since it's the number of gallons of untreated fuel in the same number of oz of 2 cycle. Sometimes 256:1, halving the previous.

In your PD I would run Power Service.
 

sledhead999

Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2016
Location
UT
TDI
2004 Jetta GL TDI Auto
I was off on my ratio stated above. I run 16oz to 26gal of fuel, or about 200:1 in my Powerstroke.

I run the white bottle of Power Service for anti gelling purposes in the winter. Is that what you would recommend for my PD?

Power Service
 
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bmwM5power

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May 3, 2007
Location
Rochester NY
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15 GSW TDI S 6MT / 02 JETTA TDI GLS 5MT 15 GOLF TDI 6MT
Ive tried optilube, powerservice, stanadyne, but the only additive that really gives you a little boost in power and fuel economy and quiets down the engine is the Liqui Moly ( Lubro Moly) super diesel additive LM 2002, I use a 300ml can per tank
 
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Bob_Fout

Oil Wanker
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Sep 5, 2004
Location
Indiana
TDI
2003 Jetta - Alaska Green (sold) / 2015 GTI 2.0T
I was off on my ratio stated above. I run 16oz to 26gal of fuel, or about 200:1 in my Powerstroke.

I run the white bottle of Power Service for anti gelling purposes in the winter. Is that what you would recommend for my PD?

Power Service
White bottle for winter, silver/grey bottle for non-winter.
 

TDI smile

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Edmonton, Alberta (b4 BC - LOWER MAINLAND = Chilli
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2002 TDI (ALH) with 513,000 km. First Owner and very happy... No Problems, never left us stranded on the Highway. Average useage is about between under 4 ltr. and 5 ltr. Normal longdistance travel: 4.1/100
Ive tried optilube, powerservice, stanadyne, but the only additive that really gives you a little boost in power and fuel economy and quites out the engine is the Liqui Moly ( Lubro Moly) super diesel additive LM 2002, I use a 300ml can per tank

Every Month or so I use that or DIESEL KLEEN, but not for every tank.;)
 

TDI smile

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Location
Edmonton, Alberta (b4 BC - LOWER MAINLAND = Chilli
TDI
2002 TDI (ALH) with 513,000 km. First Owner and very happy... No Problems, never left us stranded on the Highway. Average useage is about between under 4 ltr. and 5 ltr. Normal longdistance travel: 4.1/100
Is that bad to use on every tank?
For 200,000 km around I used NOTHING. My GURU told me to put once in a while DIESEL KLEEN in. I buy sometimes LIQUI MOLY, just as I feel!:cool:
 

Bob_Fout

Oil Wanker
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Indiana
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2003 Jetta - Alaska Green (sold) / 2015 GTI 2.0T
What will white bottle hurt if you use it in the summer? In essence why screw around with two formulas when one will do?
Won't hurt a thing. White bottle doesn't have all the same components as the silver bottle, as there has to be room for the anti-gel and water-handing components.

Here is what Power Service states about it. (http://powerservice.com/learning-category/faqs/)

Power Service said:
What is the difference between Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost and Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost?

Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost (in the white bottle) is a winterizer/antigel for use when temperatures drop below 30°F. for winter operability. Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost (in the silver bottle) is an injector cleaner and performance improver for use when temperatures are above 30°F. Use our seasonal tip to help remember which product to use: “White for winter, silver for summer.”


Can I use Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost and Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost at the same time?

Yes, we have many customers that do not want to lose the performance improvements provided by Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost when the weather gets cold. The products are compatible and can be used together.


How often should I use Power Service diesel additives?

Our recommended Year-Round Maintenance Schedule is:
Every time you fill up:

If temperatures are above 30°F, add Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost (silver bottle) for maximum performance. This Max HP Formula is loaded with cetane, detergent and lubricity improver to provide peak diesel performance.
If temperatures are below 30°F, add Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost (white bottle) for winter operability. This Arctic Formula will prevent fuel gelling and protect against fuel-filter icing.

Will it hurt my engine to use Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost year-round, even though it contains an antigel for winter operability?


No, it will not hurt your engine to use Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost (in the white bottle) year-round. However, for maximum performance we recommend using Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost (in the silver bottle) when temperatures are above 30°F. (Use our seasonal tip to remember: white for winter and silver for summer.)
 

MichaelB

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Aug 11, 2009
Location
SE Wisconsin
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2014 Passat SE DSG
Won't hurt a thing. White bottle doesn't have all the same components as the silver bottle, as there has to be room for the anti-gel and water-handing components.

Here is what Power Service states about it. (http://powerservice.com/learning-category/faqs/)
Well the only component I am looking for is water handling. And white still has a cetane boost and a lubricity add, the rest of it so what? And that water is still present in the summer. What is (maximum performance) we recommend using Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost (in the silver bottle) Don't you need maximum performance in the winter time too? It sounds like a marketing strategy to sell 2 products vs 1. I am not knockin' their product, just trying to simplify things.
 
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Bob_Fout

Oil Wanker
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Location
Indiana
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2003 Jetta - Alaska Green (sold) / 2015 GTI 2.0T
Well the only component I am looking for is water handling. And white still has a cetane boost and a lubricity add, the rest of it so what? And that water is still present in the summer. What is (maximum performance) we recommend using Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost (in the silver bottle) Don't you need maximum performance in the winter time too? It sounds like a marketing strategy to sell 2 products vs 1. I am not knockin' their product, just trying to simplify things.
There's only so much room in the bottle, you give up "max performance" for the winter-functions. Some people mix the white/silver 50/50.

Just water-removing? This used in conjunction with PS white/silver might do the trick.

http://powerservice.com/psp_product/clear-diesel-fuel-tank-cleaner/
 

MichaelB

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Aug 11, 2009
Location
SE Wisconsin
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2014 Passat SE DSG

DPM

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Newtownards, N. Ireland
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2019 Rav4 AWD Hybrid, Citroen C4 BlueHDI
why would anyone worry about water in the fuel in one of these puny little car things? Seems kinda obsessive, no?
 

Rico567

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jun 13, 2003
Location
Central IL
TDI
2013 Passat TDI SEL Premium (Turned in 7/7/18)
Ive tried optilube, powerservice, stanadyne, but the only additive that really gives you a little boost in power and fuel economy and quiets down the engine is the Liqui Moly ( Lubro Moly) super diesel additive LM 2002, I use a 300ml can per tank
That stuff is eight bucks a can on Amazon. I thought my adding Opti-Lube according to directions was pretty high.......
 

Bob_Fout

Oil Wanker
Joined
Sep 5, 2004
Location
Indiana
TDI
2003 Jetta - Alaska Green (sold) / 2015 GTI 2.0T
I believe if you want to maximize water removal white bottle will work just fine year round. Buying both and mixing just complicates things.
Ask Power Service what they recommend to remove water.

If mixing is complicated... do you cook or bake? Had chem in school? ;)
 

Drivbiwire

Zehntes Jahr der Veteran
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Oct 13, 1998
Location
Boise, Idaho
TDI
2013 Passat TDI, Newmar Ventana 8.3L ISC 3945, 2016 E250 BT, 2000 Jetta TDI
2014 Common Rail, Passat TDI
Type of injector: Solenoid

Cause of failure: Water that was not suspended in the system.
Internal parts all showed extreme areas or RUST and CORROSION due to free water forming and circulating in the fuel system. The areas that showed the most damage are areas inside the injector where fuel does not freely circulate. This prevents water which forms to remain for long periods of time OR these ares areas are where water can boil off and cause steam pitting which is also suspected as a cause of the failure.

Im still working to see if these injectors can be restored and the extent of the parts required to return to service, if at all.

Solution: Regular dosing of Power Service (White Bottle)

Cost of repair $3500-$4000

 
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MichaelB

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2009
Location
SE Wisconsin
TDI
2014 Passat SE DSG
I believe if you want to maximize water removal white bottle will work just fine year round. Buying both and mixing just complicates things.
Ask Power Service what they recommend to remove water.

If mixing is complicated... do you cook or bake? Had chem in school? ;)
Just had to replace a set of pp764 that with the 100k cleaning/recalibration were not salvageable due to some fine grit that made its way past the stock fuel filter. Also signs of water. Reinstalled my cat 1r-0750 filter to hopefully prevent this issue in the future. Also went back to regular dosing of white bottle power service as per DBW.
2014 Common Rail, Passat TDI
Type of injector: Solenoid

Cause of failure: Water that was not suspended in the system.
Internal parts all showed extreme areas or RUST and CORROSION due to free water forming and circulating in the fuel system. The areas that showed the most damage are areas inside the injector where fuel does not freely circulate. This prevents water which forms to remain for long periods of time OR these ares areas are where water can boil off and cause steam pitting which is also suspected as a cause of the failure.

Im still working to see if these injectors can be restored and the extent of the parts required to return to service, if at all.

Solution: Regular dosing of Power Service (White Bottle)

Cost of repair $3500-$4000
Bob thanks for banning me for a week it gave me time to pause and reflect about what is said here by me and others. Keep up the good work:eek:
 
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cp

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2001
Location
usa
TDI
2006 TDI Beetle
Massive corrosion...on a two year old system?

What does the factory recommend using to fight this problem? IIRC, they recommend you buy good fuel. How can they remain happily ignorant of this these miracle drugs which prevent all kinds of bad things from happening and causes all kinds of good things to happen simultaneously?
 

MichaelB

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2009
Location
SE Wisconsin
TDI
2014 Passat SE DSG
Massive corrosion...on a two year old system?

What does the factory recommend using to fight this problem? IIRC, they recommend you buy good fuel. How can they remain happily ignorant of this these miracle drugs which prevent all kinds of bad things from happening and causes all kinds of good things to happen simultaneously?
The factory doesn't recommend anything. DBW recommends Power Service White Bottle as an anti water solution. Take it or leave it . He works on the injectors VW installs which work perfectly fine until they encounter water in the fuel.
 

cp

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2001
Location
usa
TDI
2006 TDI Beetle
I'll leave it.

That's right; the factory doesn't recommend anything. I find it difficult to believe that the 'water in the fuel' problem has completely escaped the attention of VW AG's engineering department. In fact, I'm quite sure the problem of water in the fuel has been thoroughly examined by VW engineers and their findings are accurately reflected in the instructions in the owners manual--buy good fuel and let it go at that.

If a 2014 fell victim to ruined injectors by foregoing the use of snake oil in the fuel, my 2006 should have bit the dust years ago.
 

MichaelB

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Joined
Aug 11, 2009
Location
SE Wisconsin
TDI
2014 Passat SE DSG
I'll leave it.

That's right; the factory doesn't recommend anything. I find it difficult to believe that the 'water in the fuel' problem has completely escaped the attention of VW AG's engineering department. In fact, I'm quite sure the problem of water in the fuel has been thoroughly examined by VW engineers and their findings are accurately reflected in the instructions in the owners manual--buy good fuel and let it go at that.

If a 2014 fell victim to ruined injectors by foregoing the use of snake oil in the fuel, my 2006 should have bit the dust years ago.
I guess you never worked in an engineering department in manufacturing. I did and if it wasn't a problem in the factory it wasn't deemed a problem to the company. Factory engineers are not gods just people payed to do a job that satisfies the requirements of the factory they work for. The solution to water in the fuel would have been buy good fuel "not my problem" what you as an owner of our product buys and uses is not our problem. You give these engineers to much credit.
 
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20IndigoBlue02

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Aug 22, 2001
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Was North NJ, now SoCal
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2002 Golf TDI-- deceased
The factory doesn't recommend anything. DBW recommends Power Service White Bottle as an anti water solution. Take it or leave it . He works on the injectors VW installs which work perfectly fine until they encounter water in the fuel.
Prior to the CR's & DPF's in the US/Canada market, there was a TSB by VWoA to use the Stanadyne One-shot all-season, but that was primarily for its anti-gel properties.
 

20IndigoBlue02

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Location
Was North NJ, now SoCal
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2002 Golf TDI-- deceased
I guess you never worked in an engineering department in manufacturing. I did and if it wasn't a problem in the factory it wasn't deemed a problem to the company. Factory engineers are not gods just people payed to do a job that satisfies the requirements of the factory they work for. The solution to water in the fuel would have been buy good fuel "not my problem" what you as an owner of our product buys and uses is not our problem. You give these engineers to much credit.
Manufacturing engineers care about production/assembly of a product. You have apples to oranges experience.

The R&D and Field Support engineers (which I have experience in all three, listed), takes into account what happens in the field, and improving products with updates, replacements, and/or remedial solutions.
 

MichaelB

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Aug 11, 2009
Location
SE Wisconsin
TDI
2014 Passat SE DSG
X2. http://www.stanadyne.com/
Developed by a company that manufactures injectors & pumps
It's better than PS
Below is a quote from stanadyne's advertising:
"Helps Remove Water – special demulsifiers cause tiny water droplets to come out of suspension/emulsion, so the filter/separator can more effectively remove water."
From what stanadyne says about it's product. It helps but your filter/separator does the real heavy lifting.
 
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MichaelB

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Location
SE Wisconsin
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2014 Passat SE DSG
Manufacturing engineers care about production/assembly of a product. You have apples to oranges experience.

The R&D and Field Support engineers (which I have experience in all three, listed), takes into account what happens in the field, and improving products with updates, replacements, and/or remedial solutions.
Well then VW's field engineers have missed the boat dealing with water in the diesel fuel as there have been no updates, replacements, and/or remedial solutions from VW. As I said earlier they may view the water issue as "not my problem" The term engineer is very vague in today's world. I needed to add this; the R&D guys are the worst they prove a concept can be achieved then sell it to management (non engineers MBA type guys) then dump it on the production and field service people to make it work.

In my experience of 40 years in industry; heavy manufacturing and oilfield services, I have met and worked with a lot of engineers and technical people that were not good problem solvers. Most were intelligent, but either forgot how or did not understand the process of analyzing a problem and figuring out a logical path to find the root causes (plural) that could create the bad event. They were good at recognizing the problem but not always adept at working it back to the cause.
Tony
 
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