EGR Delete Kits

PimpJuice216

New member
Joined
Sep 16, 2020
Location
Norwalk Ohio
TDI
1998 Jetta 1.9L
I have a 1998 mk3 Jetta TDI and I want to do an EGR delete but am not at all sure on which kit is worth my money and will last. Does anyone have any suggestions?
 

Mongler98

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Location
Northern MD (HAGERBUSH)
TDI
98 Jetta TDI AHU 1.9L (944 TDI swap in progress)
all you need is to remove the parts, put a bank of steel over the egr port on the manifold with a new gasket, and bypass the hoses with some copper pipe and pex fittings. do not use barbed. the 3/4 PEX fittings in brass are a perfect size. infact, if you want my kit i made, your welcome to it. the blank plate and the bypass fittings. i wont need them on my 944 build. $10 with plus shipping?
BTW, DO NOT clean the intake manifold unless your willing to spend another 4 hours cleaning the intake runners on the head. TRUST ME, you can and many have destroyed a perfectly good engine that way. Chucks flying off into the valves is bad mkay!
And honestly, fixing and repairing the EGR system is in your best interest seeing as you are in a place that has winters.
 

garciapiano

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2018
Location
Southern California
TDI
1997 Jetta TDI (1Z)
Unfortunately, I don’t believe there is a plug and play kit for mk3s. I had to assemble my own.

It's simpler if you leave the stock intake in place. However, because the "EGR delete" on the mk3s doesn't actually delete the EGR valve and just deletes the cooler, you'll still have that restrictive butterfly valve and the poorer-flowing stock intake. The EGR valve is integral to the intake on the Mk3s, can't be removed by itself so you need a different intake manifold if you wish to remove it.

For my kit, I discarded the stock AHU/1Z intake manifold and used a smoother-flowing PD130 intake from a Passat, so my parts list is longer:

- PD130 intake from a longitudinal layout engine (so that it faces the correct way) Link with more info: https://forums.tdiclub.com/index.php?threads/pd130-pd150-intake-manifolds.248917/post-2592878
- New intake manifold gasket
- Race pipe to adapt between charge pipes and intake manifold
- Silicone intercooler hose / step-down 45° angle to connect to stock intercooler piping, with a matching hose clamp
- Coolant hose to adapt the heater hoses to the now-gone EGR cooler; (if you want OEM VW like me, it’s part number 1H0819371)
- 3/8" double-ended hose barb to adapt the coolant bottle to flange outlet water line (or just a new, complete run of hose)
- Small vacuum hose cap for the N75 Vacuum control solenoid (since it no longer needs to attach to the EGR Valve)
- Blanking cap and gasket for the exhaust manifold, with new copper nuts
- You'll also want a tuning chip to get rid of your EGR code check engine light since you'll now have that stored.

You'll also want, as Mongler mentioned, to clean the ports in the head if you decide to remove the stock intake manifold. it is a pain in the behind and takes forever, but it is necessary.

The result (I painted the manifold black for some reason):


The PD130 is a well-documented modification; while subtle, the car definitely breathes better. Spool time and throttle response are improved.
 
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Mongler98

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Location
Northern MD (HAGERBUSH)
TDI
98 Jetta TDI AHU 1.9L (944 TDI swap in progress)
- Small vacuum hose cap for the N75 solenoid (since it no longer needs to attach to the EGR Valve)
the n75 has NOTHING to do with the EGR. do not disconnect any of that. you want to delete the entire EGR controller by plugging the line from the vacuum pump to it! not the n75
 

garciapiano

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2018
Location
Southern California
TDI
1997 Jetta TDI (1Z)
the n75 has NOTHING to do with the EGR. do not disconnect any of that. you want to delete the entire EGR controller by plugging the line from the vacuum pump to it! not the n75
Correct! My mistake. It has been a while since I tinkered with either of those. For some reason, I thought they were integrated into one unit. They do look somewhat physically similar. The vacuum control valve is separate from the N75. But yes, you will need to cap off that port on the vacuum controller if you decide to delete the EGR itself.
 
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Mongler98

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Location
Northern MD (HAGERBUSH)
TDI
98 Jetta TDI AHU 1.9L (944 TDI swap in progress)
See the problem with egr deletes is it causes more issues than it solves.
A car that takes even longer to warm up or even have heat in the winter, most states will require an inspection for emissions and it will fail and you will always have a check engine light unless you spend $300 on a tune to delete it. It's a bunch of work for nothing gained.
 

ToddA1

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Aug 3, 2011
Location
NJ 08002
TDI
'96 B4V, '97 B4, '97 Jetta
I’d just adjust the value in vcds, if you want to do it. Pretty much does the same thing, without any sacrifices.

-Todd
 

CasaEd

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2017
Location
Portugal
TDI
VW Passat TDi B4, VW Passat TDi B4 GL, VW Passat B3 PD AWX Conversion
The gain from an EGR delete is a longer engine life, re-burning burnt exhaust gas shortens the engines life considerably and you don't get that build up of crud in the intake manifold and head inlet tracks.
 
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