Diesel TO WVO CONVERSION proton wira (aka Mitsubishi Galant)

Haytham

New member
Joined
Apr 6, 2021
Location
SEA
TDI
1.0 elite
does anybody have any experienced performing these type of conversion. i'm planning to convert the car once i buy it and have enough knowledge on what to do. The car is proton wira but borrowed the engine from 9th gen mitsubishi galant. the car is 20 year old and used
 

miningman

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Location
alberta
TDI
2003 Golf
you obviously havent researched this matter very clearly......... theres been more tdi motors destroyed by WVO than you can shake a stick at
 

TDIMeister

Phd of TDIClub Enthusiast, Moderator at Large
Joined
May 1, 1999
Location
Canada
TDI
TDI
Keep the oil well settled, fine-filtered and dry. To remove suspended water, use a desiccant like silica gel. A heated setup like from Greasecar would be preferred but you may get away without it because of the tropical climate where you are (I assume Malaysia - I was born there).

If you are disciplined at keeping the oil clean and dry, you should be able to get some lifetime still. If and when the engine or car dies (whichever comes first), oh well - it owes you nothing given its age. :)

Most of the oil in SE Asia will be from palm. It makes excellent biodiesel with the highest cetane numbers but unfortunately also comes with the highest viscosity. You never have to worry about gel point because it never goes below 20°C ambient unless you're in one of the Highlands. Ideally, it would be preferable first to transesterify waste palm oil into biodiesel first instead of pouring the oil straight into the tank. You could even make a business or cooperative out of it to collect the used oil, which is available in abundance, turn it into biodiesel and sell/use it among a co-operative.
 

philngrayce

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2004
Location
Connecticut
TDI
'02 Jetta, '06 Jetta, Both Gone '13 Leaf, Gone Liberty CRD, Subaru Forrester and MB300SD
I don’t know anything about Protons or Mitsubishi Galant diesels. But since you are asking on the VW forum, I can tell you that 20 year old tdi motors are generally pretty tolerant of WVO. You need to do the conversion right, operate it correctly and use clean, dry oil. As with any modification, there is always some risk, and you should be willing to accept that going into it. Of course, you want to be sure you have a good source of oil before you commit to this project.

Good luck, let us know how you make out and feel free to ask questions.
 

avcentraltias

Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2020
Location
Midlands UK
TDI
1z Powered T4 Van
Running on WVO seems to be an art rather than a science. All four of my cars and vans are running on WVO but some are happier on it than others, and its taken me a few years to figure out whats best for each vehicle and at what time of year. All are low compression diesels, by modern standards and all are running Bosch injector pumps. In the winter I will use a blend of WVO and Diesel and if it gets really cold ill just use diesel as the oil will start to solidfy and that causes problems.

If you are in a warmer part of the world that wont affect you much, but you still have three major enemies. Water, water and WATER! Water molecules are suspended in used oil but as water molecules are heavier than oil molecules they sink to the bottom but any water left in the oil and your car isn't going anywhere. All you have to do is find a way to keep the oil perfectly still before you use it and leave it undisturbed for a minimum of three months, maybe less if you live somewhere warm. Personally, I leave mine to stand for a year before I use it, but by then I don't even have to filter it and its dry. Then you have to find a way of recovering the settled oil from the water, fat and other vomit smelling rubbish that is now at the bottom of your settling tank.

As for converting the vehicle, you just need to be able to get the vehicle to start and then warm the fuel pipes up while the car is running. That might mean using two tanks. One for diesel and one for WVO and just switching them over using a simple valve. Ive seen people wrap their engine coolant pipes around the fuel filter to warm the WVO up when the vehicle is running. Heat exchangers are a good idea and really easy to fit. Ive used expensive conversion kits in the passed and concluded that they arent really worth it. You can put something together for a fraction of the price that does much the same thing and without the added complications of fault finding during a breakdown.

You will wreck your engine doing this. Maybe not for years, maybe sooner, but my view is that WVO saves me thousands of pounds every year. So replacing a second hand engine every now and again is a small additional cost in comparison.

Good luck with it.
 
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