Diesel Fuel Additives - What are you using?

Lightflyer1

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Sep 13, 2005
Location
Round Rock, Texas
TDI
2015 Beetle tdi dsg
I would like to know this as well. Do you all have links to white papers or other technical articles on the subject?
Thanks in advance!
Just realize that a huge majority of people use no additive at all and experience no problems at all. If you have a specific issue such as cold weather, as mentioned above, then you should consider using one. I personally have never found any water in my fuel since 2005. If you do, you need to find a better supplier, not an additive. Most fuel has some small percentage of bio in it anyway so lubricity usually isn't that much of an issue. Most cars run just fine with the cetane levels currently in pump diesel.

Cold weather is the only thing I would consider using one for. Since I live in Texas that isn't an issue for me. I look at the pump I use to insure there is some bio content and leave it at that. The only thing even close to lab reports or study on this was called the Spicer report, and it found that even a small bio percent was the best thing for lubricity of all the additives tried.

Your choice to use one or not. Don't expect to notice any difference at all except your wallet will be lighter and your hands and car will stink if you get even a drop of the stuff anywhere. I have a couple gallons of different ones I tried some time ago and haven't used since. I would gladly give them away to anyone close to me, just to get them out of the garage. Think I may post them up in the local section for free.
 

Martin Winterkorn

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 29, 2018
Location
Valley of the Sun
TDI
2015 Golf TDI SE w/ Lighting Package
In the 21 years that I've been driving diesels, I've learned to buy and use whatever is on sale. From what I've learned, every brand uses the same additives to mix its own special formula. While the ratios might be proprietary, the chemical make up is not.


:)
+1

Just picked up a 64 oz bottle of Howe's Diesel Treat for Walmart fo $8.99. BK is right its all the same active ingredients, only each company has their own ratios.
 

CleverUserName

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2014
Location
NorCal
TDI
2014 OZ Cruze CTD & 2010 JSW 6MT & 2017 GMC Canyon CCLB ATX 2.8 Duramax
+1
Just picked up a 64 oz bottle of Howe's Diesel Treat for Walmart fo $8.99. BK is right its all the same active ingredients, only each company has their own ratios.
Diesel additives 101:

Nearly all diesel additives have the same basic ingredients. 2-EHN and aromatic hydrocarbons like trimethylbenzenes. If it is a winter formula, it will have some additional light distillates and solvents to prevent gelling. Naptha is a common anti-gel.

2-EHN boosts cetane. The aromatics are combustion catalysts, dispersants and also add lubricity. Naptha and light distillates lower the gel point.

If you live in a moderate climate, don't use a winter formula or All-in-one like Standayne PF. You'll end of paying for solvents in the formula which aren't necessary and will dilute the "good stuff".

Disregard all the brand specific advertising and buy a strong formulation. You can look at the product SDS to determine how concentrated the ingredients are. A higher concentration equals a more effective product, lower treat ratio and more value for your money.

Buying small bottles of any additive are expensive. You are better off buying in bulk and measuring it yourself at the pump.

I'm using this blend, Amalgamated TDR-FL, it is very concentrated. I buy it in bulk directly from the manufacturer. Add 10 mL per gallon of fuel. I have a 200 mL beaker to accurately measure it in @ each fill up. This is also the only additive that has ever given me any real MPG increase.

If purchased in bulk, TDR-FL is an additional $0.10/gal to treat diesel @ 400:1.

There are also metallic based additives, ferric or ferrous picrate comes to mind. Been around since the '40s. Supposedly works well but I haven't tried it yet. FPC-1 is one of them. I think Enerburn is also.
 

CrazyMonkey

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2015
Location
Albany, OR
TDI
2015 Golf SportWagen TDI SE 6M
Just realize that a huge majority of people use no additive at all and experience no problems at all. If you have a specific issue such as cold weather, as mentioned above, then you should consider using one. I personally have never found any water in my fuel since 2005. If you do, you need to find a better supplier, not an additive. Most fuel has some small percentage of bio in it anyway so lubricity usually isn't that much of an issue. Most cars run just fine with the cetane levels currently in pump diesel.

Cold weather is the only thing I would consider using one for. Since I live in Texas that isn't an issue for me. I look at the pump I use to insure there is some bio content and leave it at that. The only thing even close to lab reports or study on this was called the Spicer report, and it found that even a small bio percent was the best thing for lubricity of all the additives tried.

Your choice to use one or not. Don't expect to notice any difference at all except your wallet will be lighter and your hands and car will stink if you get even a drop of the stuff anywhere. I have a couple gallons of different ones I tried some time ago and haven't used since. I would gladly give them away to anyone close to me, just to get them out of the garage. Think I may post them up in the local section for free.
I appreciate the input.

It gets cold here, thankfully not like the midwest or northeast, but our winter diesel adds antigel additives. Also, all the diesel contains either 5% or 20% biodiesel depending on the station. I also try to stick to Shell or Chevron and avoid the unknown suppliers.

Maybe I'll see what I can find around here for water removal and dump that in every so often in the winter.
 

Lightflyer1

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Sep 13, 2005
Location
Round Rock, Texas
TDI
2015 Beetle tdi dsg
You either have a water problem or you don't. If you do and it is all the time, you need to change fuel suppliers. If it is intermittent, every so often may not help. Do some searches here and see when the last times you can find that anyone actually reports having a water in fuel issue. I don't think I have read of any in the last 5 years from people using known pump fuel from a national retailer.

If you do want to add something for water, from my reading you want something that keeps the water suspended and passes it through safely rather than something to make it drop out. I don't know or remember the technical terms for it but that is my understanding.

I would also say that the number of owners who use no additives vastly outnumbers those who do. I don't read here much of their cars going kaput any more often than the additive users. It won't hurt and may or may not help to use one, the choice is yours. I have tried most of the major ones in the past with no real noticeable difference with any of them. That is the crux of the issue as you will never be able to tell if it has done anything for you or not, other than the mental feeling it may give you. Good luck!
 

CleverUserName

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2014
Location
NorCal
TDI
2014 OZ Cruze CTD & 2010 JSW 6MT & 2017 GMC Canyon CCLB ATX 2.8 Duramax
You either have a water problem or you don't. If you do and it is all the time, you need to change fuel suppliers. If it is intermittent, every so often may not help. Do some searches here and see when the last times you can find that anyone actually reports having a water in fuel issue. I don't think I have read of any in the last 5 years from people using known pump fuel from a national retailer.

If you do want to add something for water, from my reading you want something that keeps the water suspended and passes it through safely rather than something to make it drop out. I don't know or remember the technical terms for it but that is my understanding.

I would also say that the number of owners who use no additives vastly outnumbers those who do. I don't read here much of their cars going kaput any more often than the additive users. It won't hurt and may or may not help to use one, the choice is yours. I have tried most of the major ones in the past with no real noticeable difference with any of them. That is the crux of the issue as you will never be able to tell if it has done anything for you or not, other than the mental feeling it may give you. Good luck!
Emulsification additive = allows water to pass through the fuel filter.
De-Emulsification additive = assists in removing water in the fuel filter.

With that said, water is a contaminant and is supposed to be removed in the fuel filter assembly. Water can cause catastrophic failure of HPCR HPFP. It is better to use an additive that De-emulsifies water so it can be removed.

CA and TX have the best D2 in the country. We are lucky our states have set a minimum standard and we have high quality fuels. Other states, who rely on minimum federal standards can see a much greater effect from using a quality additive formulated to raise cetane, remove water, add detergency, and increase lubricity. Additives have a much greater effect on poor quality fuels.
 

armando_m

Member
Joined
May 10, 2016
Location
Guadalajara Mexico
TDI
2016 Golf sportwagen
Bought an additive "akron" is the brand sold at the gas station where I live

Poured in about 250ml or about 1/4 of the 1LT bottle

Engine is noticeable more responsive across all rpm and slightly less noisy at low rpm/iddle - I have a Revo stg 1 tune which probably takes advantage of any increase in the cetane
Cost about $2 dollars or 4% of the cost of a fillup
 

Lightflyer1

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Sep 13, 2005
Location
Round Rock, Texas
TDI
2015 Beetle tdi dsg
The big question here is what was the quality of the fuel as it came from the pump. If it is of poor quality to start with it would make sense that an additive would help. Can you find out the specs on the fuel as purchased?
 

Lightflyer1

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Sep 13, 2005
Location
Round Rock, Texas
TDI
2015 Beetle tdi dsg
Not good at all above 20% for the newer cars. I sure wouldn't be using them if I had any other choice. VW approves up to 5% for most and up to 20% for those few states who mandate that percentage. Anything above 20% and you will probably have issues bio mixing with your oil. There was someone here early on who tested this in his car and confirmed this.
 

FarmerKlutz

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Location
US
TDI
2015 TDI Sportwagen S
Greetings,


Newbie owner as of the 13th of a 2015 TDI Sportwagen S 6 spd manual. Vehicle came from Calif, via DC area, via Michigan area, its origination. (I found the previous owner's insurance registration cards in the glove box) with nearly 25K miles. It is CPO from a local VW dealer, with whom I'm acquainted. While the vehicle has been CPO'd, I've no idea what was used in the engine previously and want to be as pro-active as possible ensuring the health of the injectors, cleaning whatever carbon may have accumulated, improve overall performance, etc... I'll be through my first tank of diesel before the end of the day and it's been in the 20s F several times this past week.



Have been reading about the necessity for some sort of fuel treat for diesel engines (water, lubricity, keeping carbon build up to a minimum if not eliminated.)


I'm determined to keep this engine as healthy as possible, as I commute to work.


I'm miserably confused with regard to these additives and have been a bit frustrated with searching an answer in the forums.


Requesting knowledgeable veteran TDI owners with the following, please:


  1. Are there any reliable 3rd party tests/analyses of the various products demonstrating efficacy?
  2. I saw one post that noted the use of ONLY petroleum based additive in diesel engines (I'm assuming alcohol or other non-petroleum based products potentially degrade into components resulting in moisture and possible contributing to related issues?
  3. I'm not in a position to lay out funds willy-nilly on testing a bunch of different additives, funds are currently tight and I'd like to be as surgical about this as possible.
I think based upon what I've read, I've narrowed my choices to:


  • Howe's (Diesel Treat and meaner Kleaner)
  • Stanadyne (though uncertain as to which one, brand name kept coming up)
  • Power Service (though for some reason don't necessarily get such a warm fuzzy regarding this one.)
I'm NOT out to offend anyone with the foregoing.


Really looking for tests/answers/legit.


Most grateful for direction to a solid thread on this topic and/or answers to the foregoing.


Respectfully...


 

jason_

Veteran Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2014
Location
grand rapids michigan
TDI
2015 s wagon dsg
Anything with lubricity.

The cp4 is a ticker waiting to explode your wallet.

Personally I add a touch of 2stroke oil, as I plan to delete dpf in future.

Sent from my 2PS64 using Tapatalk
 

CleverUserName

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2014
Location
NorCal
TDI
2014 OZ Cruze CTD & 2010 JSW 6MT & 2017 GMC Canyon CCLB ATX 2.8 Duramax
Greetings,


Newbie owner as of the 13th of a 2015 TDI Sportwagen S 6 spd manual. Vehicle came from Calif, via DC area, via Michigan area, its origination. (I found the previous owner's insurance registration cards in the glove box) with nearly 25K miles. It is CPO from a local VW dealer, with whom I'm acquainted. While the vehicle has been CPO'd, I've no idea what was used in the engine previously and want to be as pro-active as possible ensuring the health of the injectors, cleaning whatever carbon may have accumulated, improve overall performance, etc... I'll be through my first tank of diesel before the end of the day and it's been in the 20s F several times this past week.



Have been reading about the necessity for some sort of fuel treat for diesel engines (water, lubricity, keeping carbon build up to a minimum if not eliminated.)


I'm determined to keep this engine as healthy as possible, as I commute to work.


I'm miserably confused with regard to these additives and have been a bit frustrated with searching an answer in the forums.


Requesting knowledgeable veteran TDI owners with the following, please:


  1. Are there any reliable 3rd party tests/analyses of the various products demonstrating efficacy?
  2. I saw one post that noted the use of ONLY petroleum based additive in diesel engines (I'm assuming alcohol or other non-petroleum based products potentially degrade into components resulting in moisture and possible contributing to related issues?
  3. I'm not in a position to lay out funds willy-nilly on testing a bunch of different additives, funds are currently tight and I'd like to be as surgical about this as possible.
I think based upon what I've read, I've narrowed my choices to:


  • Howe's (Diesel Treat and meaner Kleaner)
  • Stanadyne (though uncertain as to which one, brand name kept coming up)
  • Power Service (though for some reason don't necessarily get such a warm fuzzy regarding this one.)
I'm NOT out to offend anyone with the foregoing.


Really looking for tests/answers/legit.


Most grateful for direction to a solid thread on this topic and/or answers to the foregoing.


Respectfully...


http://forums.tdiclub.com/showpost.php?p=5454405&postcount=34
 

Lightflyer1

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Sep 13, 2005
Location
Round Rock, Texas
TDI
2015 Beetle tdi dsg
You really need to do some reading here, as this has been discussed to death already. There is no necessity to use any additive at all. Thousands and thousands of people use straight D2 with no issues. Some choose to use an additive because they choose to. There is no legitimate proof that any of them provide anything that that makes any real difference other than an additive for extreme cold weather operations, when needed. The HPFP issue has always been a small issue and as time has progressed become even smaller. If it does happen it is covered by the warranty so I wouldn't worry about it at all. If there is any biodiesel component in the pump fuel you buy you are already getting enough lubricity. The pump fuel is already treated for winter by the refinery/distributor. Unless you are operating in below zero conditions you probably don't need an additive for that. If you have water in your fuel you need to find another fuel source. I have never found any water in my fuel since 2000 or so when I got my first diesel. The cetane levels are sufficient for the job. More might make it run a little quieter or give you a small percentage gain in mpg, but it will cost you more money and you need to carry some with you and it stinks to high heaven if you should get any on you. Doesn't wash off easily either.

It comes down to just making a personal choice. You will get a load of people telling you to dump all kinds of things in your tank. All will have little to no proof that they do anything for you other than cost you some money. I have personally tried many of them over the years and have just resorted to finding fuel locations that sell B20 or less fuel and let it go at that.

What you won't hear here much is from the thousands and thousands of those who use no additive and have had no issues. If you were close to Texas I have several left over gallons of stuff in the garage I would give you.
 

Oldboatdriver

Active member
Joined
Oct 1, 2017
Location
MD
TDI
2015 Golf Sportwagen TDI, 2015 Porsche Cayenne Diesel
You really need to do some reading here, as this has been discussed to death already. There is no necessity to use any additive at all. Thousands and thousands of people use straight D2 with no issues. Some choose to use an additive because they choose to. There is no legitimate proof that any of them provide anything that that makes any real difference other than an additive for extreme cold weather operations, when needed. The HPFP issue has always been a small issue and as time has progressed become even smaller. If it does happen it is covered by the warranty so I wouldn't worry about it at all. If there is any biodiesel component in the pump fuel you buy you are already getting enough lubricity. The pump fuel is already treated for winter by the refinery/distributor. Unless you are operating in below zero conditions you probably don't need an additive for that. If you have water in your fuel you need to find another fuel source. I have never found any water in my fuel since 2000 or so when I got my first diesel. The cetane levels are sufficient for the job. More might make it run a little quieter or give you a small percentage gain in mpg, but it will cost you more money and you need to carry some with you and it stinks to high heaven if you should get any on you. Doesn't wash off easily either.

It comes down to just making a personal choice. You will get a load of people telling you to dump all kinds of things in your tank. All will have little to no proof that they do anything for you other than cost you some money. I have personally tried many of them over the years and have just resorted to finding fuel locations that sell B20 or less fuel and let it go at that.

What you won't hear here much is from the thousands and thousands of those who use no additive and have had no issues. If you were close to Texas I have several left over gallons of stuff in the garage I would give you.

I hope you're right cause I haven't used any snake oil in my '15 GSW. My brother uses additive in his '99 Jetta TDI and a Duramax truck but he does it in bulk in a 500-gallon tank and because his engines are older.

My question is how do you check if there's water in your fuel? I would like to be able to check it periodically to see if there's any necessity for additives. Also, do you recommend keeping the tank on the fuller side to avoid condensation issues. This time of year, we can get 40-degree temp swings in a day.
 

Lightflyer1

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Sep 13, 2005
Location
Round Rock, Texas
TDI
2015 Beetle tdi dsg
Check the bottom of the fuel filter canister when changing the filter. Pour it into a clear jar and check for water after letting it settle. I fill mine when it needs it. If water in the fuel where a big problem you would hear of people breaking down all over. When there is an issue at a station you sure hear about it.
 

tdidieselbobny

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Location
Stafford,NY (WNY)
TDI
'03 Galactic Blue Jetta TDI, '15 Silk Blue Golf Sportwagen TDI
All I know is I've been using Stanadyne lubricity formula for a while in my '15 GSW. I didn't have any my last fill up, and it's been taking longer for it to start this tankful. Before this tank, in the colder weather, it started on the second or third revolution. Now it's been taking a good 4 seconds to start on the first start of day:confused:.
 

funoutdoors121

Veteran Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Location
CT (USA)
TDI
15 GSW S 6MT
We have been using Optilube XPD year round, in our 2 TDIs, for the last few years. We buy it in 1 gal container and then carry a smaller 12 oz fill bottle to add around 4 oz at each fill up.
So far so good, never had a gelling issue nor any HPFP issue.
 
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