bio as jet A fuel?

vwrobert51

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Location
Maui Hawaii
TDI
2004 Jetta Wagon
I was just wondering if diesel fuel is only a few steps from jet fuel, has any one thought about working bio into jet fuel?
 

RC

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Oct 13, 2000
Location
Maryland`s Eastern Shore
TDI
Two White 96 B4 Wagons
I believe there might be seroius problems with high altitude gelling, something you wouldn`t want to encounter. ALthough I do remember reading somewhere that someone was burning it in a plane although I can`t remember if it was a blend or B100. Perhaps a diesel ultralight would work fine.... hey that sounds like a neat project.
 

ofhs93

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2004
Location
Scranton, PA
TDI
Jetta GL, 99.5, Silver
What RC said...plus...JetA is closer to Kerosene than diesel...thats why we always recomend not using any leftover JetA in our cars....unless you blend it with a big dose of BioD to counteract the lack of lubrication.
 

Wally

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2001
Location
The Springs, CO
TDI
98 NB, 96 and 97 B4Vs, & 03 A4V
Read all about it:
http://www3.baylor.edu/Aviation_Sciences/pdf/PT6ReportWeb.pdf

Pages 40 and 49 have a great view of the rather distinct difference between the left engine burning JetA (K1) and the right engine burning Bio. The bio side is a lot cleaner. If you just wanna see the pics go here: http://www.baylor.edu/bias/index.php?id=5723

There are plenty of details and graphs and real science to keep any engineer/scientist happy. The bottom line: Bio makes a great jet fuel.

And obviously, Biodiesel is a compression ignition fuel just like diesel, jet fuel, and home heating oil. Therefore it can directly replace any of these fuels used in a compression ignition environment.
 
Top