Big Brake Brackets

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
2012 Jetta TDI 6sp MT

When I had 1st and 2nd Gen Taurus SHOs, I would buy brackets that moved the stock brake calipers up and then install the larger brake rotors from the 3rd Gen Taurus.

Is there a way to do something similar on my Jetta?

Or is there a VW or Audi with bigger brakes that are cheap to upgrade and actually fit?

I'd prefer the former because it's likely cheaper.
 
Last edited:

oilhammer

Certified Volkswagen Nut & Vendor
Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Location
outside St Louis, MO
TDI
There are just too many to list....
The NCS had three brake sizes on the front. 280mm, 288mm, and 312mm. The lowly Jetta S with the 2.slo was the only one to get the 280mm, and that version has no separate bracket for the caliper... it is part of the carrier. These are essentially the same brakes the 2.0L and TDI A4 cars got on the front. So you don't want these.

The TDIs, the 2.5L, and most of the later 1.8L NCS got the 288mm front brakes. These are similar to what the 1.8t and VR6 A4 cars used. These DO have a separate removable caliper bracket, and the outside spring.

The GLI uses the big 312mm front brakes. That is what you want if you want to upgrade. And you can unbolt the caliper bracket and bolt it to your existing carrier. You'll also need the splash shield under the rotor.

I don't know what wheel fitment would be like with those, as all the GLIs came with the awful 18" or 19" tire-eating ride-punishing wheels. The GLIs also got IRS (all the NCS got this for 2014).
 

Shenandoah

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2008
Location
Shenandoah Valley, VA
TDI
2005 Jetta Wagon; 2005 Beetle; 2004 Jetta; 2002 Golf (three of them); 2002 Jetta Wagon; 2000 Audi TT->TDI; 1999 Beetle
If you go with the 312mm rotors, you'll need 16" wheels at a minimum to fit over the caliper/rotor.

Eric
 

TurboABA

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Location
Kitchener, ON
TDI
RIP-2010 Jetta 6spd 2014 Touareg Execline
First step is to check your PR codes or VIN and figure out what's already on your vehicle.
More than likely, you're already on 288s.
It won't be worthwhile unless you're tracking or doing some hooliganry to spend on changing rotors\calipers\pads and possibly wheels to fit them.
Your best approach is to put pads on that offer more bite or specific characteristics that you're after.
What is it that you're trying to solve or improve on?
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
First step is to check your PR codes or VIN and figure out what's already on your vehicle.
More than likely, you're already on 288s.
It won't be worthwhile unless you're tracking or doing some hooliganry to spend on changing rotors\calipers\pads and possibly wheels to fit them.
Your best approach is to put pads on that offer more bite or specific characteristics that you're after.
What is it that you're trying to solve or improve on?
I carry a lot of weight in tow equipment in and on my car. So when I'm at really high speed and need to brake, I don't want brake fade like I've been getting. Don't want them to warp either.

I already have 17" Audi wheels so I can fit the 312 mm brake rotors. I can buy cheaper after market ones. But it sounds like I need the GLI hub and caliper, and bolt them on to my stock setup and use my carrier. I need to confirm that before I start, though. Not sure.
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
The NCS had three brake sizes on the front. 280mm, 288mm, and 312mm. The lowly Jetta S with the 2.slo was the only one to get the 280mm, and that version has no separate bracket for the caliper... it is part of the carrier. These are essentially the same brakes the 2.0L and TDI A4 cars got on the front. So you don't want these.

The TDIs, the 2.5L, and most of the later 1.8L NCS got the 288mm front brakes. These are similar to what the 1.8t and VR6 A4 cars used. These DO have a separate removable caliper bracket, and the outside spring.

The GLI uses the big 312mm front brakes. That is what you want if you want to upgrade. And you can unbolt the caliper bracket and bolt it to your existing carrier. You'll also need the splash shield under the rotor.

I don't know what wheel fitment would be like with those, as all the GLIs came with the awful 18" or 19" tire-eating ride-punishing wheels. The GLIs also got IRS (all the NCS got this for 2014).
Thanks for the info!

It sounds like I need the GLI hubs, my carrier, the GLI calipers, and the GLI rotors, correct?

Will it change anything on my suspension geometry, because I have the 28mm sway bar and coilovers that use shorter end links. It's because I didn't realize the coilovers I bought were low boys that need the shorter end links. I just keep the ride height near the top of the adjustment so that the car isn't too low. Not a fan of too low for my personal work vehicle I tow behind other vehicles.
 

oilhammer

Certified Volkswagen Nut & Vendor
Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Location
outside St Louis, MO
TDI
There are just too many to list....
All you should need is the GLI calipers, brackets, rotors, and splash shields. Carriers (with the bearings and hubs) should be the same. Brakes won't change anything on the suspension.

The only thing I am not sure about is the flexible brake hose, so better get that too.
 

TurboABA

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Location
Kitchener, ON
TDI
RIP-2010 Jetta 6spd 2014 Touareg Execline
Well, the 280s are only 22mm thick, the others are 25mm so depending on what you're starting with, you might gain from the extra material in terms of heat absorption\dissipation with regards to fade. Going cross drilled\slotted will also help. What kind of pads are you using? Maybe you need to step it up to some Hawks or similar!
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
Well, the 280s are only 22mm thick, the others are 25mm so depending on what you're starting with, you might gain from the extra material in terms of heat absorption\dissipation with regards to fade. Going cross drilled\slotted will also help. What kind of pads are you using? Maybe you need to step it up to some Hawks or similar!
I think I'm using Thermo Quiet O'Reilly brake pads because they don't put off hardly any dust.
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
All you should need is the GLI calipers, brackets, rotors, and splash shields. Carriers (with the bearings and hubs) should be the same. Brakes won't change anything on the suspension.

The only thing I am not sure about is the flexible brake hose, so better get that too.
Awesome. Thanks. That sounds good.

I'll do the fronts first to see how I like them. I usually like making the rears quite a bit bigger to take some of the load off the front, but that's in my track cars. I don't think I'll need them in this work car. But if I do, is the conversion similar to what you described for the fronts?
 

oilhammer

Certified Volkswagen Nut & Vendor
Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Location
outside St Louis, MO
TDI
There are just too many to list....
You have no upgrade option for the rears. NCS twist beam cars all use the same rear brakes. You'd be talking swapping out the entire rear suspension in order to get the larger 272mm rears to work.
 

TurboABA

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Location
Kitchener, ON
TDI
RIP-2010 Jetta 6spd 2014 Touareg Execline
I'll put some higher-quality, low-dust pads on the bigger brake setup.
You need to decide what you value most....... tradeoffs need to be made depending on what you're after... performance, cost, lifetime, etc....
 

Mongler98

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Location
COLORADO (SE of Denver)
TDI
98 Jetta TDI AHU 1.9L (944 TDI swap in progress) I moved so now i got nothing but an AHU in a garage on a pallet.
My o suggest you just get better tires and pads.... that car has more than enough stopping power.
No reason to have to stop that much faster if you cant go fast into a turn and hold your line.
Tires and driving skill are everything.
 

Mongler98

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Location
COLORADO (SE of Denver)
TDI
98 Jetta TDI AHU 1.9L (944 TDI swap in progress) I moved so now i got nothing but an AHU in a garage on a pallet.
You need to decide what you value most....... tradeoffs need to be made depending on what you're after... performance, cost, lifetime, etc....
If you want stopping power... noise and dust are not an issue. If that is an issue... buy a better car...
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
Do I need to worry about the brake pad wear sensor coming off of one or the GLI brake pads? It plugs into something that my TDI doesn't have.
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
My o suggest you just get better tires and pads.... that car has more than enough stopping power.
No reason to have to stop that much faster if you cant go fast into a turn and hold your line.
Tires and driving skill are everything.
When you're carrying as much weight as I carry, and you drive as fast and turn as hard as I do, the brakes matter. I don't think I'll track this car--that's what my M3 is for. This is my work car. I tow it. It's around 400 - 500 lbs more than stock. I already have good tires and bigger, wider wheels from an Audi. The car's brakes fade when I'm at really high speeds and have to brake hard. Even though I don't race this on a track, I've been tracking my track cars for 24 years now so I've built several track cars and work cars that carry the extra load I need. The builds aren't very different for the brakes and race coilovers and wear parts. Everything has to be really strong and durable. But I appreciate your comment. I probably sounded like a noob the way I asked my questions.
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
If you want stopping power... noise and dust are not an issue. If that is an issue... buy a better car...
Nah, I've been building track cars and work cars like this for a long time. If I don't want dust but want more stopping power, I just go bigger on the brakes. Works every time. I use slotted and cross-drilled rotors usually to help a bit more. I like to go overboard, just in case.
 
Last edited:

TurboABA

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Location
Kitchener, ON
TDI
RIP-2010 Jetta 6spd 2014 Touareg Execline
I read his "issue" as he's overwhelming the rotor\pad combo due to the speed and overloading.... I doubt he's attempting to outbrake someone into a chicane, etc.......
My number one issue is with his cheapy pads as he's more worried about wiping off his rims than stopping.....
Back in my hooligan days, I used to have to clay-bar metal flakes off my MKIII rims and body when washing it because of the Hawks that made it sound like a freight train while on DD duty....
 
Last edited:

oilhammer

Certified Volkswagen Nut & Vendor
Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Location
outside St Louis, MO
TDI
There are just too many to list....
Keep in mind, the bigger wheel/tire combo is also adversely effecting the car's ability to stop. Normally, stock, the NCS TDI has plenty good brakes, and they last a LONG time.
 

TurboABA

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Location
Kitchener, ON
TDI
RIP-2010 Jetta 6spd 2014 Touareg Execline
Lots of articles available to read if you want to educate yourself on why BIG brakes are on performance or track vehicles.... it's mostly due to heat dissipation. Us mortals usually do it for parking lot points or out of believing hype. It's always awesome to talk about your 8 pot calipers with 15" rotors or whatever. Bigger parts allow more heat dissipation. that's about as much as I can simplify it.

Change your pads, use cross-drilled & slotted rotors, use engine braking in conjunction with your brakes.... all that should be more than sufficient to address your current fade under street driving conditions.

This is only my opinion, and I drive daily on OEM pads & rotors.... even when I tow... so take it with a grain of salt.
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
Lots of articles available to read if you want to educate yourself on why BIG brakes are on performance or track vehicles.... it's mostly due to heat dissipation. Us mortals usually do it for parking lot points or out of believing hype. It's always awesome to talk about your 8 pot calipers with 15" rotors or whatever. Bigger parts allow more heat dissipation. that's about as much as I can simplify it.

Change your pads, use cross-drilled & slotted rotors, use engine braking in conjunction with your brakes.... all that should be more than sufficient to address your current fade under street driving conditions.

This is only my opinion, and I drive daily on OEM pads & rotors.... even when I tow... so take it with a grain of salt.
I don't tow with the car. I tow it behind trucks I'm delivering. I have to carry a lot of extra weight in it. That's why I need the added heat dissipation from bigger rotors.

I always get slotted and cross-drilled rotors, too. I've seen the real-world testing with the individual variations of each and together.

Slotted rotors peel a hot boundary layer of gas and dust off of the rotors, which dissipates the heat more quickly. They stop faster because if that, but it's the heat dissipation part of that equation I'm interested in. That's from real-world testing by independent researchers with no bias.

The cross-drilled rotors mostly just help with rotor weight, counter-balancing a bit of the extra brake material from the added diameter. I like lighter weight especially since my car has so much extra weight in it. It's minimal, but it has a greater effect since it's unsprung rotating mass.

I appreciate your willingness to respond. I'm newish to Jettas, which is why I'm asking these questions. You guys know more about Jettas than I do. I've been familiar with the science of this stuff for a long time, though. And I drive my car like I'm at the track probably at least once a day. There are some good roads and turns where I live. I'm very hard on it when I do that, like power-drift hard. I know I shouldn't be doing that on the street but I know how to do it safely. It's second nature to me. Heck, we have far more right turns/exits than left, so I have to replace the tire on one side of my cars twice as often as the other side's tires. lol When I at the track (or Karting), if I'm not at the top of my run group, I'm usually right behind the top guy and it's usually because he has a really great setup and more power. I'm not bragging--couldn't care less about that. I'd much rather have guys beating me for a good challenge. I just mean I really enjoy this stuff and I know a lot about it. I don't know much about Jetta mods though and I didn't want to break the bank unless necessary. ;)

Seriously, though, I appreciate your input. Very helpful. Opinions are useful when they differ.
 

Cephyr13

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Location
Dallas, TX
TDI
2012 Jetta TDI, 6MT
Keep in mind, the bigger wheel/tire combo is also adversely effecting the car's ability to stop. Normally, stock, the NCS TDI has plenty good brakes, and they last a LONG time.
Very true. The stock wheels wouldn't stop the car properly. Had problems. So I got much wider Audi wheels and much wider tires. That helped a ton. But now, at really high speeds (were talking over 100 MPH), it's the brakes that aren't up to the task. The extra 400 - 500 lbs in the car really does make a big difference when you're at those speeds. My Audi wheels are fairly lightweight. Not the lightest, but not bad.

Read my response above this one for more details. I know the science, just don't know Jettas nearly as well as you guys. Didn't want to break the bank unnecessarily.
 
Top