B7 Audi A4 BHW swap

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
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Alberta
TDI
2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
Thanks for the pictures. I guess it doesn't matter if it's on the compression stroke or exhaust stroke for this?
 

Lotawood

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Joined
Oct 17, 2017
Location
montana
TDI
2005 BHW Passat sedan
Might want to double check my answer looking up BHW timing belt replacement.

Going from memory, the cam turns once to 2 turns of the crank.
I think if the cam is locked and the crank is locked you are in the right spot. That cam has to be pretty exact to get the stop pin all the way in. I used a drill bit for cam locking.

When you are done with the whole timing belt replacement, turn just the crank by hand/ratchet/breaker bar. Turn it several revolutions. More than 2. Only clockwise. If no lock up then good to go on to timing by VCDS.
 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
Location
Alberta
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2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
Little more progress. All lobes, lifters, and bearings are badly worn except for the rear most lobe and lifter, number 8, which has no visible wear at all. I did a little dumb dumb and as a result I'm putting a new head gasket and head bolts in. At 350k kms it's probably a good idea to do while it's this easy anyway with how inexpensive the parts are.

 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
Location
Alberta
TDI
2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
Don't set the head on any solid flat surface or you will be replacing injectors.
One of the alignment dowels was still in the head so in that picture it was resting on the dowel. Now it's been sitting back on the block since.
 
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JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
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Alberta
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2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
An update on the project; I'm currently out of province for a few weeks working so that pushed it back again. Once I get back I'll figure out what I'm doing with the head and then get the engine buttoned up. I got the "new" color gauge cluster back from @jetta 97 before I left so that part should be ready to install.
 

jetta 97

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Dec 25, 2008
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Dallas (McKinney) ,TX ,USA
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2 X Jatta MK5 2006
Little more progress. All lobes, lifters, and bearings are badly worn except for the rear most lobe and lifter, number 8, which has no visible wear at all. I did a little dumb dumb and as a result I'm putting a new head gasket and head bolts in. At 350k kms it's probably a good idea to do while it's this easy anyway with how inexpensive the parts are.
Yes, I would put new Camshaft , Lifters and bearings. Remember Injector rockers and bearing cap bolts needs to be replaced ., total of 18 bolts .
 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
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Alberta
TDI
2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
*Update*
The engine in sitting on the stand, head ready to be bolted back down and top end assembled. I should have all the parts I need now for the car so it's just a matter of putting it all together. I've been working 6 days a week to get a project done by mid November. Once that's done I'll take some time to throw the car together and I'll have some more updates/pictures at that point. It's supposed to snow here over night so that'll help with some motivation for the Quattro lol
 

PickleRick

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Nov 29, 2017
Location
Greenville sc
TDI
05 GLS BHW sedan 5 speed conversion. BHW Carver SantaCruz in progress
Are the 05 and 06 BRM lifters and bearings the same as the BHW?
 

PickleRick

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Nov 29, 2017
Location
Greenville sc
TDI
05 GLS BHW sedan 5 speed conversion. BHW Carver SantaCruz in progress
Yes. The come with the AMC kit along with cam seal and pd pump gasket.
 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
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Alberta
TDI
2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
Picking away at it here and there when I get a chance after work.

Removed the valves and cleaned them, along with the carbon built up in the ports. Reassembled with new valve seals.


Head is bolted back on and I'm ready to bolt down the cam and timing stuff.
 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
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Alberta
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2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
I was working on putting the top end together last night and found that a couple of the oil gallery plugs had come out, one was stuck between the two rockers when I took them off but the other is missing completely. Maybe that had contributed to the bad cam wear due to the loss of oil pressure. I did some searching and found a post by @Franko6 about using an old cam cap bolt as a plug. I got the one plugged and now I'm planning to pull the other aluminum plugs out and make some more of these ones out of the old bolts. Thanks for the information on that thread of yours Frank.

 

Franko6

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Joined
May 7, 2005
Location
Sw Missouri
TDI
Jetta, 99, Silver`
Thank you for your credit for the rocker galley repair...

When using the aluminum replacement 'pin' I make from OEM cam cap bolts, there is absolutely no need to hammer any punch mark into them. The barrel of the cam bolt is an interference fit by about .002". It's not coming out. If you brad the aluminum plugs, like you did on the steel plugs, they won't come out either. Correct bradding: with a center punch, strike the outside of the ring to drive metal over the plug. Three points is fine.

It's a shame to put an AMC cam back in. It will not make it 300k. Maybe 150k. At least, that is my experience. We can modify that AMC cam so it does work for a long time, but...

1. Every single PD motor's cam is exactly the same incorrect 'solid lifter' profile. That is the reason your lifters are dished. The cam design beat the lifters to pieces.
2. The cam followers do not oil correctly, causing oil starvation. We modify the bearings to double the oil volume to the cam followers and correctly oil the bearings themselves.
3. We also think a proper break-in will extend life expectancy, especially if the correctly formed cam lobes are made. We use Joe Gibbs BR and have lots of cams with very long life to prove it. Our current leader has an additional 475,000 MILES on it. That is over 764,000km AFTER the cam was installed.

Side note: Lithium grease is our LEAST FAVORITE assembly lube. If too much is used, you clog the filter and if it's left too long, it corrodes the metals.

There are a lot of good assembly lubes, but our favorite is also from Joe Gibbs. It is a grease that stays where you put it, but when it heats up, it melts into the oil, as it is an oil thickener. A 1oz tube is enough to assemble 10 engines. $3 USD.

One last bit... DO NOT tighten the injector hold down bolts all the way until you know your injectors are working correctly. We use 78 INCH lbs +1/4 turn, with the purpose of trying the engine out. If the injectors all work well, tighten the bolt another 1/4 turn. If the injectors do not work correctly, you can remove the hold down bolts (which are about $4 a piece.. We only use OEM for a good reason...), without ruining them. Once they get tightened to the final torque turn, you cannot reuse them. They will break off in the hole. We DO NOT tighten, as VW recommends, 3/4 turn unless you want to recoil the bolt threads that are going to pull out.

Our reasoning for not fully tightening the bolts: Often enough, the PD injectors lay around until the solenoid end 'glues shut'. If that happens, it starts easily, idles smoothly, but won't go over 35kmh. It costs plenty to revive a damaged solenoid, to the point replacement is a reasonable alternative. Storing injectors covered by diesel is a very good idea.



Best of luck to you... let me know if I can be of any additional service.
 

vwztips

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Aug 30, 2009
Location
Greenville, SC
TDI
2005 Passat GLS Wagon TDI 5 spd manual w/BSM delete 2012 Tiguan TDI/DSG 2005 Audi A4 6MQ 2011 BMW X5 35d
Hello Frank, long time no talk. I thought you has moved to multiple use bolts for the cam caps and injector cam bolts. Have you changed back to VW bolts?
 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
Location
Alberta
TDI
2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
Thanks for all the info @franko, if I need a cam in the future I know where to go. I just didn't want to throw too much money at this bhw yet and so for now I went with the cheaper replacement to get it up and running.

As for the injector hold down bolts, I didn't ever have them loosened and was hoping to just leave them as is if possible. Thank you for the heads up on that though.
 

Franko6

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Joined
May 7, 2005
Location
Sw Missouri
TDI
Jetta, 99, Silver`
JDM,

When the injectors aren't taken from the head, they seem to continue to work. Not sure I understand that, but the loss of the solenoid main pop is something to watch out for.

If there is reason to remove them, we caution that the method for holding them in leaves something to be desired. The single bolt through the hold down block does not push straight down. It pushes the injector body against the opposite side of the bore from the hold down bolt. This causes the body of the injector to vibrate against the injector bore, leaving a burr that will cut one or both of the top black rings on the injector. That will lose all your pressure from the tandem pump, sending it back to the return galley. If the top ring leaks, it's possible to thin your oil with fuel. The burr can be removed with some fine emery cloth or, as we do, a Bebielle 240 grit 60 flapper 1" x 1" wheel with a 1/4" shaft for a die grinder. The fine wheel will polish out the burr very nicely. 500 grit emery cloth will work, but it's slower.


vwztips,

I see two things wrong with using non-stretch bolts for the injector hold downs. First, the incident of pulling the threads out is increased, as the bolts being used do not have enough 'stretch' built into the metallurgy. The second part is the OEM bolts have a bevel under the bolt head to help even out the loading on the hold down block. I have had enough problems with in-frame repair of hold down bolts with it's stripped 6mm x 1.0 threads and stacked recoil kits. It's tedious and I'd rather not cause any more issues with a straight torque bolt. I know the OEM bolts are more expensive, but I really don't like repairing threads ripped out of a head.

I might mention, someone trying to drill out a 6 x 1.0 screw is one of the moments that you could wish to have left the bolt to a professional. Most often, the bolt breaks off even with the hole. The bolt end often can be slowly and carefully backed out, but the better idea is not to get into the situation that causes most of the breaks. Use OEM hold down bolts. Don't reuse them.
 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
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Alberta
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2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
I've been working on the car this week and got to a point where I'm a bit stuck. I had bought a DKM single mass clutch kit that was said to be for mating a vw tdi to an Audi transmission. I removed the 5.5mm spacer between engine and transmission as I was instructed to do and mated them together. When I tested the clutch, the pedal would "bottom out" ½ or ¾ of the way to the floor. I'm not sure what was bottoming out and not sure how to figure that part out now. According to my measurements from where the throw out bearing meets the pressure plate fingers with the clutch pedal OUT it only has 8mm of extension when pushing the pedal till the slave cylinder is fully extended. I don't know how much the throw out bearing moves when the pedal is pushed. Is 8mm enough to to reach fully disengaged? Could the "bottoming out" I felt be the point where the slave cylinder reaches full extension? I don't have any experience with the given circumstances and so any advice or recommendations what to do from this point would be appreciated.

Pictures showing the distance from the mating surface to the fingers and to the throw out bearing.





 

Franko6

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May 7, 2005
Location
Sw Missouri
TDI
Jetta, 99, Silver`
What is the part visible from behind the clutch fork's pivot point? All of the pivots I've used on TDI's is a simple button that screws into the bellhousing and the retaining spring snaps over to hold the fork in place. It appears that part may be holding the clutch out further than it should.

I think the clutch pedal should go full range to the floor. Hydraulics that reach their limit will spike pressure, often disastrously.
 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
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Alberta
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2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
What is the part visible from behind the clutch fork's pivot point? All of the pivots I've used on TDI's is a simple button that screws into the bellhousing and the retaining spring snaps over to hold the fork in place. It appears that part may be holding the clutch out further than it should.

I think the clutch pedal should go full range to the floor. Hydraulics that reach their limit will spike pressure, often disastrously.
I can post a picture with the fork off later today. What you see there is just an extra support to pivot on but the usual pivot ball that you mention is also behind there. If I were to remove that support and just leave the ball the fork would sit in the same position.
 

JDM_dieselwagon

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Dec 21, 2019
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Alberta
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2003 Jetta Wagon ALH, 2006 Audi A4 BHW swap in progress, 2002 Ram Cummins
@Franko6 here is the pivot behind the fork. I'll remove it and try again with only the ball but it seems to be sitting the same.

 

Franko6

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Joined
May 7, 2005
Location
Sw Missouri
TDI
Jetta, 99, Silver`
I've seen those before. Honestly, I can see that there is extra support with that device. I can see why it's done that way, but it's not required. And if you look closely, I have to say that the center pivot ball has not been touched, as the grease has not been disturbed, unless you did so after removing the fork. Only the two side pivot points are touching. The side pivot points appear to be nearly the same height as the top of the ball. It looks to me as if the fork would drop substantially with the alternative pivot device removed. Try it... what have you got to lose? Measure the distance again.

Is it possible that the slave cylinder is not retracting all the way? The Throw Out bearing should be very close to the inner face of the sliding sleeve. How far is it from the tip of the button to the flat of the attachment point? I'll measure what the distance is for one of mine.

It is Thanksgiving Day for us. I'll be somewhat remote. Best of luck...
 
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