A Longitudinal Herm-o-Hanger

Growler

Got Soot Vendor
Joined
Nov 24, 2003
Location
Millersport, Ohio
TDI
Schmutz, 2015 Golf Sportwagen DSG & Schnurren, 2001 Golf GL 2 door 5M
Here is a link to the original Herm-O-Hanger.

While this design works great and Herm has been using it for years, One thing I didn't like about the design is how its right in the way of the timing belt stuff you are working on. the upper charge pipe, power steering res, and the hanger are all in the way so I have been using the jack and wood on oil pan approach.. Then I saw something similar to this in JasonTDIs hands at Fest 2009. Just now getting around to making one for myself. I have to this point used the jack on oil pan method. figured Ill give this a shot. Used it today and it worked great on the Jetta I changed the belt on.

Here it is in place on my 2001 Golf.


Parts List:
1 - 2x4x31" long
1 - 2x4x12" long
1 - 2x4x3-1/2" long
1 - 2x2x6" long
1 - 90* joist hanger
1 - 18" 3/8-16 allthread rod
2 - 3/8-16 coupler (one gets drilled thru one end to fit the shackle rod)
1 - 1/4" shackle for the lifting hole on the head
1 - 3/8-16 hex nut
1 - 3/8 flat washer
2 - 7/16 wide flat washers
5 - #10 x 2 1/2" flat head wood screws
6 - #6 x 1 1/2" flat head wood screws
1 - 9/16" ratcheting wrench (or normal box wrench) to adjust it up & down.


Assembly:

Here on the firewall, we have a 6" or so piece of 2x2, screwed to the joist hanger with 6 1-1/4" wood screws and one countersunk 2-1/2" screw from the 2x2 into the 2x4 from below (predrill the holes to prevent splitting)


Out on the core support, I cut a 12" piece of 2x4 and a 3-1/2" piece of 2x4.
These are countersunk and screwed together with the 2-1/2" wood screws to the long 2x4. this assembly allows you to screw the square block to the long 2x4, then screw the 12" piece to the square block.


The 31" long 2x4 is drilled thru the skinny side at 12-1/4" from the firewall end for the 3/8-16 allthread. I used a 7/16 drill bit for this in my electric drill.


after you have the wood all assembled and the hole drilled, you can slide the allthread thru the hole, thread on one of the two nuts about 1" onto the rod.
then slide the two bigger washers and the smaller washer onto the rod and spin the second Coupler all the way down the rod until about 3" of rod sticks thru the 2x4. I applied a liberal amount of bearing grease to the flat washers and the allthread to allow them to spin against each other easily.



Modifying the coupler:

get out your center punch and make a good mark about 1/2" from one end of the coupler. use a smaller drill bit to drill a hole thru the coupler and then thru the other side. figure out what size hole you need to drill to fit the shackle easily but not too loosely. you want to leave as much meat on the coupler as possible and drill thru the middle of it and not off to one side too much.


Finishing up:
Screw the completed coupler onto the end of the allthread about 3/4-1" deep.
then take the nut on that end of the rod and jam it against the coupler to lock the coupler and nut together and to lock them to the rod so that the rod doesn't spin in the nut & coupler.

With that done you can set your newly minted tool on the car and adjust the length of the allthread so that the shackle can be slipped into the lifting eye on the engine, and connect to the hole you drilled in the coupler. It should look like this when connected. note the nut locked/tightened against the coupler.


Let me know what you think. Its good to have options, right? :D
 
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eb2143

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 26, 2005
Location
Rhode Island
TDI
None
Interesting...as I'm sure you've gotten before, I'm surprised those plastic pieces are strong enough for this, but apparently they are.

I built the Herm-o-Hanger this weekend and honestly didn't feel it got in my way a single time! Have you ever changed an ALH using one? I just assumed it would be in my way as well. It's so high, it was more of a convenient headrest than hinderance.

I've read JasonTDi insinuate that Herm's is too high and that it tips over...I'd like to hear a little more detail on that story.
 

fase2000TDI

Vendor
Joined
Aug 30, 2005
Location
Chesapeake, VA, USA 401-919-0466
TDI
2003 Jettawagon TDI; 2015 GSW 6MT
It doesn't tip over if you cut the angles properly to fit the fender.

I have a "HermoHanger" for the beetle, cut to fit the beetles angles. It is perfectly stable.

Growler, I'll have to build one and see how I like it. I'm not crazy about where it seems to rest. Are those areas just plastic or are they reinforced?

Also, use a barrel nut on the top where you raise and lower the vehicle. Otherwise, in a few more TB jobs it WILL cross thread in place.
 
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Growler

Got Soot Vendor
Joined
Nov 24, 2003
Location
Millersport, Ohio
TDI
Schmutz, 2015 Golf Sportwagen DSG & Schnurren, 2001 Golf GL 2 door 5M
I have a second coupler that came in the pkg. perhaps Ill use that in the place of the little nut. thanks for the idea.

JasonTDI says that the areas are strong enough and he likes the one he showed me, so I figures thats good enough for me.
 

POWERSTROKE

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 17, 2000
Location
Staten Island (The Dump)
TDI
2002 Golf
Not tryin to start trouble, but I don't like where the ends are resting. That is really thin metal up by the dash and thin plastic by the bumper. I'm not an engineer, and if it works for you, great. I'm not so sure about that placement though. I have done several timing belts up and Herms and that hanger does not get in the way at all. Just my 2 cents.
 

nate379

Veteran Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2010
Location
Palmer, AK
TDI
05 Jetta
Maybe I am missing something here, but why do you need that for a timing belt job? Jack and bolt of wood under the oil pan doesn't get in the way of anything.
 

MonsterTDI09

TDIClub Enthusiast, Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2009
Location
NoVa/NJ
TDI
2010 Jetta DSG/ up keep on 2009 Jetta DSG 2006 Jetta Pag 2 in North SEA Green
Nice job,I would use two 2x6or2x8 and a 1/2 of plywood between (example a header for load bearing wall) and leave little gap for the rod.On top I would use a 1/4 metal to spread the load out to make it safer.A wider of wood on the front and back to spread out the load.
 

eb2143

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 26, 2005
Location
Rhode Island
TDI
None
Maybe I am missing something here, but why do you need that for a timing belt job? Jack and bolt of wood under the oil pan doesn't get in the way of anything.
For one, if you're doing it on Rhino ramps a jack will constrict your space severely, and you'd be miserable whenever you need to go underneath unless you are built like a pencil. And unless you've done a lot of them, you'll be going underneath more than a few times.

Also, in my 20 minutes of searching here when making up my mind on what the more logical arrangement was, I found someone who had the block of wood slip out. ouch.

I haven't used the block of wood, but it would seem to me you can get much more precision lowering and lifting using a threaded rod than a hydraulic jack.
 

Growler

Got Soot Vendor
Joined
Nov 24, 2003
Location
Millersport, Ohio
TDI
Schmutz, 2015 Golf Sportwagen DSG & Schnurren, 2001 Golf GL 2 door 5M
I replaced the original single 3/8 nut for a coupler threaded all the way down the rod... that took a while.. geez.

Thanks for the idea Fase. perhaps a block of thick rubber to spread the load out on the radiator end? I am plenty confident in the metal up by the firewall.
 

tdidieselbobny

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Location
Stafford,NY (WNY)
TDI
'03 Galactic Blue Jetta TDI, '15 Silk Blue Golf Sportwagen TDI
Anybody ever use one of those motorcyle jacks to lift motor? They work pretty nifty,have rubber on the pads to prevent slipping.
 

nate379

Veteran Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2010
Location
Palmer, AK
TDI
05 Jetta
Set on jack stands or lift.

So? I read on the internet that someone cut their hand off with a knife, does that mean I shouldn't use knifes anymore? Set the block correct and it will be fine. Even if the jack would kick out, motor can only drop so far anyhow.

Precision is not needed, just wasting time.

For one, if you're doing it on Rhino ramps a jack will constrict your space severely, and you'd be miserable whenever you need to go underneath unless you are built like a pencil. And unless you've done a lot of them, you'll be going underneath more than a few times.

Also, in my 20 minutes of searching here when making up my mind on what the more logical arrangement was, I found someone who had the block of wood slip out. ouch.

I haven't used the block of wood, but it would seem to me you can get much more precision lowering and lifting using a threaded rod than a hydraulic jack.
 

eb2143

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 26, 2005
Location
Rhode Island
TDI
None
Set on jack stands or lift.

So? I read on the internet that someone cut their hand off with a knife, does that mean I shouldn't use knifes anymore? Set the block correct and it will be fine. Even if the jack would kick out, motor can only drop so far anyhow.

Precision is not needed, just wasting time.
Fair enough. I shouldn't have bitten on your comments looking to rehash the old debate on top support versus jack.

To answer your question directly, despite it being rhetorical given your experience with these engines, no an engine support is not required; as you know many use the jack.

The jack I have does get in the way if you prefer ramps to jack stands.
 

vwjettadsl

Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Feb 24, 2005
Location
Missouri
TDI
TDI’s
Rabbit, those do not take into account the vertical slope of the fenders.
The engine hanger I have has adjustable legs so you can match the slope of the fenders. I believe that the harbor freight hanger is the same. I do not use the hanger though, its in the way to much for a TB job. I use it mainly for clutch jobs.

I really like the idea of the longitudinal hanger, think I'll build one. I'm always leery of the jack and block of wood, never had a problem yet but its a bit risky.
 

RabbitGTI

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 20, 1997
Location
Wisconsin
TDI
B4 Passat Sedan
The engine hanger I have has adjustable legs so you can match the slope of the fenders. I believe that the harbor freight hanger is the same. I do not use the hanger though, its in the way to much for a TB job. I use it mainly for clutch jobs.

I really like the idea of the longitudinal hanger, think I'll build one. I'm always leery of the jack and block of wood, never had a problem yet but its a bit risky.
If ya wanna go sketchy, try the car on a lift, floor jack, hunk of wood under the oil pan and a six foot 2x4 between the jack and hunk of wood. :D
 

Dunno513

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2006
Location
Mirror Lake, NH
TDI
2006 NB PD-TDI DSG
I think I'll stick to homecraft before I hang my engine with china harbor stuff. BTW... $49 is the usual "sale" price for that tinfoil.


Anybody ever use one of those motorcyle jacks to lift motor? They work pretty nifty,have rubber on the pads to prevent slipping.
I had the same thought as my engine began slipping off of the jack moments after I got the engine mount back in. I either need a better under engine setup, or a hanger next time... My heart rate was a bit elevated and I hadn't rethought of the the MC lift again until now... I may revisit it as it has other useful purposes too... like tranny support when I replace my DMF.
 

ScorpionBoy

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2006
Location
CO
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
out of curiosity, has anyone used a cherry picker to grab the motor from the top?
 

RabbitGTI

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Jul 20, 1997
Location
Wisconsin
TDI
B4 Passat Sedan
I think I'll stick to homecraft before I hang my engine with china harbor stuff. BTW... $49 is the usual "sale" price for that tinfoil.




I had the same thought as my engine began slipping off of the jack moments after I got the engine mount back in. I either need a better under engine setup, or a hanger next time... My heart rate was a bit elevated and I hadn't rethought of the the MC lift again until now... I may revisit it as it has other useful purposes too... like tranny support when I replace my DMF.
Nothing wrong with the Harbor Freight engine support. I've used it many times. You're lucky you did'nt leave part of a finger in the engine mount when your jack slipped.
 

greengeeker

Vendor
Joined
Feb 8, 2006
Location
Cambridge, MN
TDI
2002 Jetta GLS
Clever. One issue for me though: you can only use this on a mk4 G/J timing belt change. The HF or the Hermohanger at least have the adjustability to serve other uses/applications.
 

Herm TDI

Vendor
Joined
Nov 21, 2001
Location
Richmond, Maine...The far side of Witsend
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2002 Golf GLS Malone Stage 3, P+520 nozzles, 11MM Inj pump, Sachs VR6 clutch, Stelth Race Pipe, Immo Deleat, EGR Deleat
The heritage of the "Herm-O-Hanger" goes back a long way.
Many years ago my Dad owned a General Motor's product (I do not reall the car make or model).
There was a small car with a large engine. The #4 spark plug was wedged between the engine mount and the exhaust manifold. The only way to replace this spark plug was to raise the engine (on the passenger side) to gain access to the spark-plug.
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I would like to add a comment:
My Dad was the last person to take his car to any "Stealership" to have a spark-Plug replaced.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The "Herm-O-Hanger" was born.
The device you see posted is nearly identical to the assembly that my Dad built.
The only differance is the length of the cross menber. If the "Herm-O-Hanger" can lift the weight of a V8 it can easily handle the piddly 1.9L TDI
Damn....I miss my Dad every day.

He would have been a proud member of the TDI forums.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
He would laugh his ass off.....looking at all of the variations of his simple idea.
Please...in his honor....continue to inovate his early steps.
Thank you,
Herman
 
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Growler

Got Soot Vendor
Joined
Nov 24, 2003
Location
Millersport, Ohio
TDI
Schmutz, 2015 Golf Sportwagen DSG & Schnurren, 2001 Golf GL 2 door 5M
Clever. One issue for me though: you can only use this on a mk4 G/J timing belt change. The HF or the Hermohanger at least have the adjustability to serve other uses/applications.
I will have you know that I have successfully used this same Longitudinal herm o hanger to change a timing belt on:

mk4 ALH (duh)
mk4 BEW
mk5 BRM
mk4 CLUTCH change to hang the engine from tranny end.

so with the addition of one more hole and relocating the threaded rod, its MUCH more useful than ONLY on a Golf/jetta ALH.

I am glad that Herm Approves :)
 

Abacus

That helpful B4 guy
Joined
Nov 10, 2007
Location
Relocated from Maine to Dewey, AZ
TDI
Only the B4V left
We made a Herm-O-Hanger with some leftover hemlock planking from the barn, but had to nail it together with a nail gun. It's not going anywhere and worked flawlessly on my clutch change. We'll be using it again shortly on my brothers B4 rear engine mount change. Using the hemlock, I'm sure it would easily lift a V-8. We used a large threaded rod, then attached a chain to the end of the rod with nuts, and attached that chain to the engine in the 2 points. Adjustment was with a cordless drill and a wrench. Simple and fast.

Herm, I'm sure your dad is watching, laughing, and smiling. No worries.
 

manual_tranny

Smyth Performance- Intern
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Location
New Bedford, MA
TDI
2001 Golf @182K; 2000 Jetta @290K
Aaron, and Herm:

As simple as a device like this is, I think the practical application is really fantastic. You both get an A+ from me!

I was thinking of a good way to help a friend install an 02M, but unfortunately my friend is in Germany and I am in Michigan. Chances are I won't be able to be there.

SO, I suggested cutting a hanger to raise up the 02M for positioning. After personally lifting 2 of these 02Js into place, I'm fed up with that method. I'm going to start using my engine hoist or wood hanger. Much smarter! If I want a workout, I'll do push-ups...
 

VWBeamer

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2009
Location
GA
TDI
2004 Jetta Wagon
I have one of the Harbor freight ones and it IS a quality tool. First off the legs DO pivot to match the slope of the fenders, and is WAY stronger than anything made out of a a 2 X 4. It's very obvious you have NO personal experience with one, they are made out of thick square tubing.

I think I'll stick to homecraft before I hang my engine with china harbor stuff. BTW... $49 is the usual "sale" price for that tinfoil.




I had the same thought as my engine began slipping off of the jack moments after I got the engine mount back in. I either need a better under engine setup, or a hanger next time... My heart rate was a bit elevated and I hadn't rethought of the the MC lift again until now... I may revisit it as it has other useful purposes too... like tranny support when I replace my DMF.
 

GTiTDi

TDIClub Enthusiast, Macht Schnell! Vendor , w/Busi
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Oct 18, 2010
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3 Spruce st Wareham, gateway to Cape Cod Massachus
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'91 GTI CJAA swap,'02 Jetta wagon ALH swap, '03 GTI 1.8T rally car, '03 Sprinter 3500
After personally lifting 2 of these 02Js into place, I'm fed up with that method. I'm going to start using my engine hoist or wood hanger. Much smarter! If I want a workout, I'll do push-ups...
Use a strategically placed ratchet strap! works wonderfully!
I have one of the Harbor freight ones and it IS a quality tool. First off the legs DO pivot to match the slope of the fenders, and is WAY stronger than anything made out of a a 2 X 4. It's very obvious you have NO personal experience with one, they are made out of thick square tubing.
I noticed the HF beam had a bit of adjustment in the legs but they wouldn't stay at the right angle..I actually threaded an M8 allen bolt into front gap between bar and legs to keep the rearward leaning angle. Works great, esp on B4s which have steeply angled fenders compared to A3/A4
 
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Growler

Got Soot Vendor
Joined
Nov 24, 2003
Location
Millersport, Ohio
TDI
Schmutz, 2015 Golf Sportwagen DSG & Schnurren, 2001 Golf GL 2 door 5M
My original setup has almost 3 years of use on it and still works great. never a creak from any of the core supports or firewalls it rests on. It works so good, I don't even have to think about it any longer.

I use it on ALH, BEW, BRM TB jobs. doesn't work on Beetles tho so I still do the block of wood and floor jack on oil pan for those.
 
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