60,000 mile service

larrydk

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Sportwagen
Just noticed that USA Maintenance scheduled for 2015 states that brake and clutch unit fluid should be changed every three years regardless of mileage?....it looks like it recommends changing it every 20,000? Is that correct? Is there a thread showing how to do this anywhere?
 

turbobrick240

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maine
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2011 vw golf tdi(gone to greener pastures), 2001 ford f250 powerstroke
Every 20,000 can't be right. Every 2-3 years is fine. Many manufacturers don't even give an interval at all. But water will get absorbed into the fluid and shorten component life if not flushed periodically.
 

Mrrogers1

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Brake fluid used to be 2yr so it's nice to see 3yr in the official docs. The 20k, may be for gassers and low mile drivers, sure. I would have to imagine us TDI'ers drive more then others so 20k comes up a bit faster for us.
I actually have a fluid tester and when water content is high it fails the test, I flush/replace. I service a number of TDI and other cars so it made since to get the tester AND we also use a power flusher to make changing quick and easy.
This does make me wonder, if the full service interval PDF is posted in the thread maintained around here? /Goes to look

UPDATE: It is >>>> Official maintenance schedule for your VW
 
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Mrrogers1

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If you're talking about DOT 5.1, it can be used BUT i don't know that it's going to remove the need, totally, to replace because of water content and fluid degradation but it seems to be compatible. DOT 5 is not compatible with our cars.
 

larrydk

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Sportwagen
The "Official" table is confusing....for the 2015 SW you can see that a 4* is marked at the 30, 50, 70 k intervals....so I assume that I am just performing a visual check at those intervals and changing in 3 year intervals?
 

turbobrick240

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It's three years for the first change, and every two years thereafter. Mileage is not a factor.
 

jerrymander

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Brake fluid is never mileage dependent. If you live in Mongolia or Nevada, you never even need to change it. It only needs to be changed on condition, which is about every 2 years in tropical wetlands. If your brakes function fine - ie without spongy or weak action - you don't need to change the fluid at all.
 

oilhammer

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outside St Louis (where it's safe)
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There are just too many to list....
Look at the build date of the car. Change it at three years out of the factory. There are some 2015 model year cars that are indeed three years old.

Just time it with another regular service. Not that big of a deal, and there is no need to make a special trip for it. Easier when the wheels are off for normal PM anyway.

The newer VAG products use DOT-4 LV (which is a step above the standard DOT-4).
 

adjat84th

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I thought the LV was only for cold climates as in "low viscosity"?
I'm almost positive I used the non LV when doing my clutch upgrade and had to top up and bleed the slave cylinder.
 

oilhammer

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outside St Louis (where it's safe)
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There are just too many to list....
I thought the LV was only for cold climates as in "low viscosity"?
I'm almost positive I used the non LV when doing my clutch upgrade and had to top up and bleed the slave cylinder.
Just going by what VAG's lit says. This is "news" that is over a decade old. The A5s are when the switch happened, but I honestly cannot say if a 2005 A5 was specified LV and a 2006 A4 was not. I just know on my lookup, when I punch in "brake fluid" on any newer VAG product, the LV is all that comes up. I punch in "brake fluid" for a 2000, it just pulls up the regular DOT-4.
 
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BobbyWires

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I always wondered about this how does water get into a sealed system?
 

oilhammer

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outside St Louis (where it's safe)
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There are just too many to list....
I always wondered about this how does water get into a sealed system?

Fluid displacement due to normal brake lining wear. That is why the cap is vented. As pads wear, the level goes down, air gets in.

I really think people overthink brake fluid. It is just not that big of a deal. And when you see the garbage that comes out of neglected systems like I have it becomes clear (no pun intended) of the need to do it if you want the system to last.

If you are the disposable car person, and you ditch the car after a few years, you likely will not see the benefit long term. Just so cheap and easy to do, though.
 

turbobrick240

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maine
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I've also heard that due to brake fluids hygroscopic nature it can pull moisture through microscopic pores in the lines/hoses, and around the piston seals. Sort of like how hydrogen stored in a seemingly tightly sealed steel tank will eventually leak out through microscopic pores in the steel.
 
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