5.5 BHW doing the balance shaft delete and other things along the way....

chickenfriend

Active member
Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
As a matter of preventive maintenance, I am doing the balance shaft delete on a Passat wagon, 5.5 BHW, with 245,000 miles.

Getting started, using a homemade perpendicular brace out of heavy channel steel:



Thanks to those who, a long time ago, posted DIY instructions.

Couple of things I am having to replace along the way. Both motor mounts were bad, as well as the two transmission mounts. I did order OEM motor mounts, made in Avon, England. Are they worth the extra money?

The oily grime on the passenger side of the engine block was terrible, so bad that I ended up pressure washing it in the shop. Looks like the oil has been coming from the valve cover. Grime was one of my major dislikes about this project.

The cam was replaced at 100,000 miles some years ago. I don't know more than that.

The harmonic balancer was heavily rusted on the inner steel ring, and I decided to replace it, figuring that if I removed the rust, I would likely bust through to the inner rubber ring.

The smaller, lower timing belt cover, on the passenger side, with the foam glued to the inside, had plastic cracks around both bolt bosses. I ordered a new cover but it was terribly expensive considering what it is and it has to come from overseas. On my old cover, the foam was in pieces and oil-soaked.

New:


I will be replacing the tandem pump and valve cover gasket. The timing belt is off at the moment and the cam and crank sprockets are locked.

So, how should I proceed to both inspect the cam for wear, and replace the tandem pump? I did order the coolant T and hoses for the region beneath the tandem pump, since I read that oil deteriorates those.

I assume that TDC with the lock tools is also TDC on the compression stroke, so I suppose I could rotate the cam sprocket a LITTLE BIT away from the lock position to gain clearance for the valve cover, as long as I return the sprocket back to where it was and re-lock it?

Also, I took the tires off for better access and visibility under the car since I don't have a lift. The extra range the upper control arms extended as a result was enough to tear their bushings. I ordered new uppers. I might as well replace the original shocks while I am at it.

I have a bite-sized rust area on the drivers fender arch where a piece of inside foam touched it. Should I just treat it and leave the missing metal? Or, should I replace the fender and have it painted?

Finally, while I have the OE lock carrier pins, I noticed that they bend easily. I still have them in, but I had to place a chair under the bumper for extra support.

How long do the radiators last? I've noticed that generally, the aluminum radiators with the crimped on plastic side tubes, make it around 20 years. Would you replace it at this time?

thanks.
 
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Zak99b5

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Apr 30, 2021
Location
Albany NY
TDI
2003 Jetta TDI
When you install the UCAs, leave the pivot bolts loose. You can then jack up the spindle until you just take the weight off the jackstand. Then torque them down. This sets the bushings at ride height, and they will last a good bit longer than if preloaded (torqued at full droop, say).

Radiator is so easy on a B5, I'd be tempted to leave it in if it's not leaking.

On my Jetta, I had rust holes from the foam behind them at the top of the wheel arch. I bought replacements, got paint mixed to my color code at the big NAPA near me, and also bought 2K clear in a rattle can. Came out nearly perfect (and I'm not a body guy at all), and the slight mismatch in color (from fading of the original paint) does not bug me near as much as the rust holes did.
 

chickenfriend

Active member
Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Thanks for the tips. Really that fender is not much metal. There is quite a bit of foam in the wheel well! I imagine that holds salt water very well.

Proper angle of access for the two concealed oil pan bolts, using a long allen wrench with socket base:



Flywheel bolt head which might interfere with the long allen wrench you use to reach the two oil pan bolts in the seal carrier (one shown, the brass insert) through the access port on the housing. It is very hard to see up in there due to the subframe bar. Being on your back doesn't help either:




I'll use your tip on the upper control arms, and I'll leave the radiator alone.

Modification of the recommended puller for the crankshaft chain sprocket:



Now some observations now that I made it to the balance shaft assembly: considerable play on the hex shaft driving the oil pump. It was at imminent failure. One of the two plastic chain tensioners was broken and there was lots of slop in the chain::

Rounding of oil pump hex shaft:


Broken tensioner:



Old chain sprocket showing slop-wear developing under the fastener heads:



I had a kit-supplied brass hex plug to plug the oil galley for the old BSD module.

As instructed, I used a 1/8" pipe tap and a 11/32 drill bit with a right angle drill. Now, that plug was 17 thread pitch, and fortunately my tap was the same, but another 1/8" tap I had was 18 thread pitch. I was able to get the plug in half-way and used red locktite on it. I like the idea of the one fellow who used a 3/8-16" tap, instead, with a 3/8" plug, a plan not requiring any drilling, he said. Here is what mine looked like, finished:



I also had trouble getting the new gear on the shaft. Heated to the recommended temperature but it didn't slip on all the way. All the way on means all the way, up against the crank boss. That it hung up may be because of a ridge line past the oil seal wear groove, which was obvioiusly caused by the sharp edge along the front side of the old gear because that is where it would fall. I took that ridge down just a little with some sandpaper, and next time, the gear went right on. Probably would have gone on the first time if I had smacked it moderately with a very large socket.

It takes a heavy bearing splitter to remove the sprocket if it doesn't go on all the way, then you have to start over. I started using the smaller one in my kit and it was bending. Use the crank plug accessory which came with the 4 pronged modified special puller used to pull the old spocket, for the center bolt of the puller to work against:







I think I will omit the windage tray mod. I would add my name to those who think it doesn't fit well. The tray already had a crack in it, probably damaged in shipping. Of course, I'll have to shorten the oil pump bolt by the length the boss on the tray would have taken up. Edit: I decided to use the windage tray after the company replaced the damaged one, and after I added a support stud and clearancing for a support shelf on the oil pan.

These two tabs on the windage tray need to be sliced off flush with the flange:
 
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rkrknight

New member
Joined
Nov 1, 2021
Location
palm springs ca
TDI
2006 passat wagon TDI
I have a 2006 Passat wagon diesel and I'm trying to fix the balance shaft and oil pump problem. I'm wondering how you decided to do the delete kit as opposed to doing a chain replacement and where do you buy a delete kit? Also you said there were a lot of diy instructions on here , can you tell me where to find them?

Thanks Rhonda
 

chickenfriend

Active member
Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Rhonda, here is one appropriate thread:


There is a Part 1 and Part 2 DIY by Chittychittybangbang.

I decided to delete the balance shaft assembly because I don't want to replace the assembly (very expensive), and even with the replacement gear driven assembly, the hex key driving the oil pump will still round out. There are several vendors for the delete kit. Google b 5.5 balance shaft delete kit. You can get them with either of two styles of oil pump sprockets, one delivers a little bit more oil pressure.

Most of what I have been fretting over is the windage tray support, but I solved that to my satisfaction by adding a stud attachment point with a wedge-shaped collar washer to one of the sides. See left center of this pic. The "sculpted" support washer is under the locknut. The orange outline on the windage tray return flange, on the right, is where I made a very small shelf, for clearancing and support on the mating area of the oil pan:




The lip of the windage tray where the oil exits through should catch the oil pan rim--I did a little clearancing on the drop-off edge of the oil pan at that area just to make sure the lip has a nice shelf and doesn't sit proud into the gasket sealing area.

 
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Mozambiquer

Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Location
Versailles Missouri
TDI
1998 VW Jetta TDI. 1982 VW Rabbit pickup, 2001 VW Jetta TDI, 2005 VW Passat wagon TDI X3, 2001 VW golf TDI, 1980 VW rabbit pickup,
I have a 2006 Passat wagon diesel and I'm trying to fix the balance shaft and oil pump problem. I'm wondering how you decided to do the delete kit as opposed to doing a chain replacement and where do you buy a delete kit? Also you said there were a lot of diy instructions on here , can you tell me where to find them?

Thanks Rhonda
I'm assuming that was a typo on the 2006 Passat wagon, unless your location is incorrect? Here in the USA they only had the B5.5 tdi Passat in 2004-2005.
Either way, I would definitely not simply replace the chain (I don't even think it's available anymore) as the chain driven balance shafts were very failure prone. The geared one is better, though still not perfect. I have two wagons with the geared version and one with the delete and the ALH pump, the vibrations aren't much different between them, so I would go with the delete, especially with the huge cost difference ($300 for the delete, or $1700 for the conversion, parts only)
 

chickenfriend

Active member
Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Can anyone suggest the order for replacing the oil pan and crankshaft cover?

I'm tending to doing the crankshaft cover first, that way I can do the sealant line over the entire circumference of the oil pan at one time and not two times.
 

Mozambiquer

Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Location
Versailles Missouri
TDI
1998 VW Jetta TDI. 1982 VW Rabbit pickup, 2001 VW Jetta TDI, 2005 VW Passat wagon TDI X3, 2001 VW golf TDI, 1980 VW rabbit pickup,
Can anyone suggest the order for replacing the oil pan and crankshaft cover?

I'm tending to doing the crankshaft cover first, that way I can do the sealant line over the entire circumference of the oil pan at one time and not two times.
Yes, the crank cover first, then the oil pan.
 

chickenfriend

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Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
I put the sealant on the oil pan rather than the block face. It's important to dry test the fitting of the pan to make sure you have enough clearance. You don't want to get oil on the sealant by it sliding against dirty engine parts. Most suggest blocking out the subframe sufficiently.

Here is the tool I used for dealing with the crank bolt: a 3/4 drive breaker bar with a pipe cheater. I had a longer 1/2 breaker bar but the flex on it was too great. I'd suggest a longer 3/4 or 1" drive breaker bar than what I used to avoid the use of a cheater:



Using the new style crank holder aluminum bar, two recommended positions for loosening and tightening:



 
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chickenfriend

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Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Another problem: getting the round connector plug fitted into the transmission. What's the trick? It's driving me crazy!

...I got it. I had to remove the bracket on the engine motor mount which holds that wiring harness. Then I was able to move the harness better and luckily I found the sweet spot.
 
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chickenfriend

Active member
Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Getting it buttoned up now. It's been a marathon. I couldn't have done it without all the online help.

I went from BSD, to replacing worn cam (lots of abrasion on the #4 cylinder cam), to replacing the tandem pump (original pump leaking air at the OE design pivoting nipple), to replacing the plastic coolant flange underneath and associated hoses.

Old Coolant Flange and swollen O-ring:





Deteriorated wires for the coolant flange sensor. I cleaned the oil and grease off, then gooped a heavy coat of RTV on the area:



Both motor mounts and two transmission mounts replaced.

Upper control arms were replaced and also shocks and struts. Ran into the famous pinch bolt removal problem for the upper control arms. My advice is to heat the bolt housing area red hot with a torch and twist the bolt out over small increments, re-heating when necessary. Use a pickle fork to drive out then pry-out the two ball joints. Clean the cavities with a plumber's pipe brush and apply anti-seize liberally to the new bolt. Even something like RTV smeared on the bolt would keep out the moisture coming in from the two ball joint slots.

I found that the N75 valve bracket was supposed to go behind the two large 8mm hex bolts holding the side timing belt cover, so I had to loosen up the carrier for an inch or two of clearance and remove the two bolts to get the bracket on, using a short, angled allen key. I replaced some of the vacuum hoses on the valve. It's a mess.

It's important, very important, to remember that when trying to get the valve cover on and needing to rotate the camshaft for necessary clearance for the tabs on the cam pulley, that the timing belt be on or the crankshaft rotated away from TDC about 90 CCW, because when the cam is locked in and the crank is TDC on #1, the interference is going to occur with only about 10 degrees of movement of the cam.

So, put the belt on and time it before putting on the valve cover as the final step to those projects.

If I had to do it over again, since I am working off the floor, I think I would take CCBB's instructions to remove the AC compressor and condenser from their mounting positions so the carrier could be completely removed. There would be better undercar light and it would be easier to get to working from the floor.

Still need to clean the EGR and change the transmission fluid.

At some point, I need to get on the rear brake mounting plate and paint it. The rusting is severe.
 
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zzdiesel

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Location
sask. mostly now Wa.
TDI
05 passat tdi Geared BSM and Bewcam 2nd 2005 deleted ,converted and bew cam stage 2 Malone3 tune.
A small point, but the AC condencer can be swung out of the way without removing the compressor.
 

chickenfriend

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Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Thanks. Maybe that information will help others. It's definitely worth moving out of the way if you will be working on your back.

Today, filled the engine with oil and was almost scared to start the engine. Runs very smoothly, even cold. Wow!!!

I think I will do 5-7K oil change intervals and stick to the diesel extreme oils. I used the VW spec oil this time.

Next on the list is a change of auto trans fluid and a new trans filter. I am also curious about getting the torsion value checked.
 

Tom in PT

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Jun 7, 2017
Location
Twilight Zone, WA State
TDI
2005 Passat sedan - SOLD; 2013 Passat DSG; both purchased new
I would stick to VW 505.01 oil in a 5W-40 blend, and I second a 5000 mile oil change interval. I put about 80,000 miles on my engine with that regime since brand new and I had no symptoms of any cam wear when I sold the car. Car started instantly in all conditions, did not smoke, idled smoothly and pulled strong. Keep that transmission running with service on schedule. You should definitely replace the motor mounts, I went with OEM. Without the balance shaft there is more vibration and questionable/old 200,000 mile mounts should definitely be replaced.
In my car I could hardly tell the difference in vibration at idle with new mounts and a balance shaft delete.
 

chickenfriend

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Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Thanks for the suggestion.

I don't seem to quite be finished with the BSD procedure. I had to get some power steering fluid to replace what I lost when I had detached the line in the lock carrier position procedure. I pulled as much of the old out with a turkey baster and also did a drain at the hose which was detached. Works fine now. Autozone had the fluid but it is expensive compared to online sources.

I drove the car a little and it threw a couple of transmission related codes. At first, I thought maybe I left something disconnected, but then I realized some transmission fluid was lost with getting into the lock carrier position, and that some of those codes hopefully are only related to low transmission fluid. The triangle "anti-slip" light came on the dash, possibly related to these codes since the computer doesn't seem to be getting the information it needs from the transmission.

....I just replaced the transmission filter and fluid, following the CCBangB procedure where the stock fluid bottle is pressurized with an air hose. It works. I used the Valvoline Max stuff. The bottle punches easily with some small needlenose. I used 1/4" od vinyl hose. Punch the air hose port above the fluid line in the bottle but to the side so you can get the rubber tipped air nozzle over the hole. I went through the cap with the supply hose. I found that a 90 degree stiff wire is not necessary, just kink the vinyl hose in a little off one end and insert it in the pan feed port. When the hose goes up the the opening, it will pop out and go in the transmission pan. I also used a level on the transmission pan flange edge and found that when all the distances from the tops of the wheel well arches are equal on the four wheels, the transmission pan is level. I jacked the car up to 34" on those distances, which allowed me to slide under the car.

I still have the old code of P0679 for the Glow Plug Module. I found the module in plain sight, directly underneath the coolant overflow tank. Looks like the connector was broken but someone zip tied the connection together. Pin connectors look good. Still don't know if there is a problem yet unless the code comes back after I clear it.

Car is at 243,671 miles.

There is no vibration problem at all, in fact, less vibration than before the BSD, but that is probably due to the motor and transmission mounts being bad originally. The only thing I notice in the cabin is the typical diesel sound. I don't have the engine cover on but don't know if that helps muffle anything or not. Apparently, the missing cover on the crankshaft pulley is supposed to help with noise--but I don't see that it would be much help. Not really a concern to me though. I am missing the plastic belly cover and would like to install that.
 
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chickenfriend

Active member
Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Despite new transmission fluid and a proper fill level, I am still getting six transmission error codes and an Electronic Stability Program light (lighted triangle) on the console which comes on after about 15 minutes of driving.

I hope the problem is as simple as being that I didn't get the transmission cables fully connected. I'll get under the car tomorrow and take a look.

....so today, took a look at the two transmission electrical plugs. They both were connected, but I pulled them out a little and pushed them in again to the "click" sound to make sure they were fully seated. Didn't see any evidence that the harness was damaged. Hard to tell since the wires are well-encased in sheaths.

I did discover that I failed to plug a connector back to the alternator. Must have disconnected it for hand-clearance.

After all the work I have done to this car, I am terrified that the transmission codes won't go away--I'll find out on my next trip to town. I did not have these errors before I did the BSD and other work.
 
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zzdiesel

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Location
sask. mostly now Wa.
TDI
05 passat tdi Geared BSM and Bewcam 2nd 2005 deleted ,converted and bew cam stage 2 Malone3 tune.
While I assume you did, you didn't say you had the car running while you topped up the tranny fluid.
 

chickenfriend

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Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
While I assume you did, you didn't say you had the car running while you topped up the tranny fluid.
Thanks. Yes, had it running while topping the fluid.

Just took a trip to town and back, didn't see the ESP warning light come on like it usually does, so that's very good, but I am still nervous.

I don't remember hearing the "click" on the round transmission electrical plug after the buttoning-up after the BSD procedure, so that might have been not fully engaged, as it should be now.

Don't know if the disconnected alternator plug I had (see previous post) anything to do with the trans codes, unless the voltage was getting low or the ECM needs a tach signal from the alternator.

Anyway, keeping my fingers crossed on the trans codes.

...couple trips and no ESP dash light.
 
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chickenfriend

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Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
So here I am again about two weeks later with a post.

I bought the Ross-Tech software so I could check codes and monitor the engine. The torsion was +0.5, so that is right on.

I cleared all codes: the primary and the secondary transmission codes and two glow plug related codes. Those have not come back so far.

Now I have a pending P0741 code, stuck off torque converter clutch, however, which will cause the MIL to light on the console. I had that code before I erased it and the rest.

I hooked up the Ross diagnostics and took a road trip. The TTC clutch looked like it was working for a while but then quit working after 10-15 minutes or so.

I read about these torque converters having a defective seal which can cause this code. After doing the BSD, timing belt, and the camshaft kit, plus a bunch of other things to this car, I'm not crazy about the idea of pulling the transmission. I'm worn out!

From what others have said, this code can also be caused by transmission fluid being low, I think I should double check that, and, now, I can use the Ross diagnostics to monitor the transmission fluid temperature for the fill procedure. I also read the car needs to be level, so I'll use stance height at the wheel wells as a gauge for setting it up on stands. Have about 1/2 tank of fuel to bring down the stance number for the back end. When I did the filling before, I went by having the transmission pan edge level, instead of the car itself.
 
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chickenfriend

Active member
Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Location
fr,va
TDI
2004 Passat BHW
Back to the camshaft replacement, here are some pictures I took. The first shows how much RTV I put on the first and last bearing caps. Note I did not bring the RTV to the edge of the square oil bleed channel, and I what I did apply, was not gooped on:



Here is what the seal channel exit looks like after installation. There should NOT be any RTV in it:




Previous cam replacement job. Note the excess RTV and how it completely filled the oil seep channel and then some:



Note worn camshaft bearing in background....
 
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