09 bypass

rmuller510

Active member
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Location
Kansas
TDI
2009 Jetta
I was wondering if anyone had ideas for fitting a amsoil bypass kit on the 09's. I have talked to the suppliers and they have no intentions of selling a kit as there was little to no demand for them on the 06's.
 

Dieselgeek

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Oct 3, 2000
Location
San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
TDI
2016 Golf TDI
There is demand for the 06 kits but not enough to warrant developing an entirely radically different system to fit the engine bay of the 09 cars. It would have to be completely different than all other kits I sell.

A bypass system would not cause any damage to an 09 in any way as stated above.
 

TooSlick

Top Post Dawg
Joined
Dec 2, 1999
Location
Dixie
TDI
Audi 100S
The combination of the improved valvetrain design and the VW 507.00 oils should mean that you get excellent wear characteristics out of the 2009 and subsequent model year engines.
 

rmuller510

Active member
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Location
Kansas
TDI
2009 Jetta
corrado tdi

The only reason i was considering a bypass system is becuase i put roughly 40,000 miles a year on a vehicle and i would rather change the oil about twice a year. I also noticed that on a 6.0 liter powerstroke after an oil change the oil will stay clear for several thousand miles, TDI is turning black after only 15 miles.
My idea for the TDI was a different or modified lid for the oil filter canister, bracket for mounting the filter somewhere, and different or modified oil fill cap. Connect the three and it should work. Is this idea crazy??
 

Dieselgeek

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Oct 3, 2000
Location
San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
TDI
2016 Golf TDI
I understand.

I already have a design that would work but it would require mounting to a MK5 Panzer skid plate which you would have to buy separately. You would also have to cut a hole in your factory plastic belly pan.
 

CMB430

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Location
HQ of "get nothing done"
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2009 Jetta TDI
Has there been any designs put into production yet for our CBEA engines yet? Due to the length of time I plan on using this car, adding a by-pass is really apealing. Thanks in advance!
 

securityguy

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2009
Location
Virginia
TDI
2009 Jetta TDI Sedan
rmuller - you know you can easily go 20K miles between oil changes if you use the 507 oil. many have had OA's done at 10K with plenty of room to spare. You don't need a bypass to get 20K out of your oil.
 

HekaweJohn

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2001
Location
Devon
09 TDI Bypass Filter Installation

I installed the Amsoil Bypass filter in my 2001 Golf and was so impressed by the oil analysis results and the duration between oil changes that I decided to install one in my 09 Jetta Sportwagen. Regrettably the engine compartment of the Jetta was either designed for mechanics with miniature hands or on the assumption that the engine is so reliable it would not need any maintenance..ever!
It only took one look at the oil sender unit's location to realize that it would be a daunting task to replace it with the Amsoil T-fitting. Not to mention there is absolutely no space for a bypass filter cartridge inside the engine compartment..anywhere!

Nevertheless, with these caveats in mind, and driven by my primary goal of prolonging my engine life through the use of doubly filtered oil, I decided to forge ahead to see what I could accomplish. To my surprise I was successful but nowhere near as satisfied with the installation when compared to the Golf.

So, for those who are not faint-at-heart and mechanically inclined here is how I accomplished this difficult installation.

First you will need the following parts from Amsoil:
BMK-21 filter mounting kit
EaBP90 Bypass filter
5 ft. BP251 hose (the kit does not include enough hose)
BP-45 Oil sender adapter kit for European cars
BP-89 Return line swivel fitting, nut and sealing washer

There is a very large and empty space underneath the driver's side fender that is an almost perfect location for the filter. On the negative side it is not well protected from impact in the case of an accident but it is the only satisfactory location that I could find. The following link to a picture shows the space after the front wheel-well cowling is removed (note that the forum limits me to 10 pictures so I have created links to some):

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/hzMMhTYa9TNA4UGGvtp00w?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

And here is another looking more directly into the engine compartment. You will notice the aluminum strut that connects to my skid plate. I mounted the filter kit to this although it could have been mounted on the frame above with self tapping screws.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/-wagHWEQk-ni23a3keXc6Q?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

Here is my final mounting solution for the kit:

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/tMN6KsYlWScfWXgTpijdvA?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

And with the filter connected. Note that the two hydraulic hoses feed nicely up into the engine compartment through a hole above this space:



Now to mount the return hose. This requires just about the entire piece of hydraulic hose included in the kit thus the need for the extra hose mentioned above. A dremel tool is required to cut a section out of the oil cap in order to fit the brass part of the swivel fitting:

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/4tm4jt0QL1IiHlU46Fh-tA?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

The underside of the oil cap needs a little flattening to fit the nut:

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/lorJV6B7J5EHOprsFWq-zA?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

The brass fitting should fit snuggly. A little silicon helps to ensure a seal:



The sealing washer and lock nut are on the underside of the oil cap. Because of the thickness of the cap the lock nut doesn't engage the nylon locker very well so I used lock-tite on the threads to ensure that the nut won't vibrate loose. (A small piece of rubber temporarily fills the drain hold to ensure that silicon doesn't get into it).

The return hose with the hydraulic fitting attaches to the swivel connector and leads back through the engine compartment, along the top of the radiator to the center connector on the mounting kit.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/KrR4uGQKvxAKXCXtDakrmw?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

Now for the very hard part; connecting the supply hose (Oil Pressure Line) to the Oil filter housing. To accomplish this you must move the upper air filter housing aside (I hung it to the hood with straps to get it out of the way) then remove the warm air intake hose, the intake air duct cover and finally the lower air filter housing. All of which are fairly easy. This diagram shows the single bolt that holds the lower air intake housing to the frame. You remove this bolt, as well as the warm air connecting hose shown at the top left. At this point you can gently lift the housing up; there are two friction connectors holding everything in place. Lifting up will loosen lower air intake from them. You can either gently move the intake up and in a counterclockwise direction which brings the air guide hose with it or remove the air guide hose first and lift straight up (see next item).



This is the warm air intake housing. It does not have to be removed but the air guide hose shown connecting to the left of it should in order to free the lower air intake housing for removal. You unlatch the top of the house and remove it exposing the top part of the hose. The bottom part of the hose connects to the lower air intake with two plastic latches. Push them both in, pull the lower part of the hose out and then lift the top part of the hose out of the housing.



This is a better picture of the air guide hose. The bottom has been swung around. You can see one of the latches that connects it to the lower air intake house. The other latch is on the opposite side.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/ulK9z9SEvitdWXT-RW707g?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

Once the air intake apparatus is removed you can see from photo what is exposed (and it is not nice). In the center of the photo you will see the oil pressure sensor located at the bottom of the oil filter house. It looks like a large nut with a red cap coming out of one end. It is almost hidden by the two hot water hoses and rightmost to these what I believe to be the turbine intake.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/85ZoO1Oa4Nbq4KfPj-1e8g?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

At this point I almost bailed out but decided to perservere. Fortunately the pressure sensor is relatively easy to remove using a 25mm or 15/16 in. box end wrench. It is a tight fit but there is enough maneuverability to get the head of the wrench on the sensor head and ease it out.

Now, there is an electrical wire connecting to the sensor and it is best to unlatch it before removal. In my case I didn't thus each turn of the sensor twisted the wire. However it is a very strong wire and survived the ordeal and I was able to unlatch the connector after I had removed the sensor. I think the safer route would have been to unlatch it prior to sensor removal. At the rightmost end of the sensor, where the wire enters the connector, there is a latch that when lifted disconnects the connecter allowing it to be pulled straight off (by pulling right).
The wire is protected by a flexible plastic insulator tube. You must be careful when moving this as other wires go through it. If you gently remove the connector from the sensor and then carefully pull the wire harness up there is enough harness to reconnect the sensor when it is later connected to the Amsoil fitting.

This is the Amsoil 'Street T' (BP-33) without any additional connections except for the European car adapter (NPT to metric) fitting at the left. This is what must be inserted back into the oil filter housing (where the pressure sensor was removed) before any other connectors are added. I added lock-tite to the back half of the threads (opposite the tip) to ensure a solid fit but exposing enough brass to ensure a good electrical ground for the pressure sensor.

As an aside there are two parts to the European adapter, make sure that the metric and not the NPT thread are inserted into the oil filter housing. The pressure sensor screws easily into the metric to NPT fitting thus it is the other one (NPT to metric) that must be on the leftmost side of this T and screws into the oil filter housing. Because the two thread types are very close it would be easy to force the NPT thread into the Oil filter house but the result could be painful.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/C_kdrYy0RM1Vxz9ggeW05A?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

This is where you need good manual dexterity. Grab the right tip of the fitting with your right hand and work it down and under the hot water hoses while watching until the thread engages the opening in the oil filter housing. Eventually they will line up and begin to (easily) thread one into the other. Manually tighten the fitting until it won't turn any more. At this point fit a box-end wrench (13mm I believe) and screw the whole mechanism into the oil filter housing until the threaded part is entirely encased and the wrench part is tight against the housing. The other threaded holes (for the oil sensor and bypass fitting) must be pointed to face up and slightly forward. If this is not the case then use one wrench to hold the metric adapter from turning while using another wrench to twist the other two outside parts to the right orientation. You will have to work around the hot water hoses but they are very flexible and can be moved one way or the other to expose the rest of the part. It is a fair bit of work but patience pays off.

Once inserted you must now add the oil pressure sensor and a hydraulic fitting the the Amsoil Street T. This picture shows what it will look like with the two additional fittings.



Add a little bit of lock-tite to half the threads of the the oil pressure sensor (as described above) and tighten it into the Street T. Do the same with hydraulic fitting adapter and screw in tight. This picture shows a box-end wrench tightening the oil pressure sensor.



This picture shows the hydraulic hose from the bypass filter mount's output connecting to the hydraulic fitting adapter on the Street T. This is the additional piece of hose that you purchase extra from Amsoil. You will notice how uncomfortably close the oil sensor and hose are to the hot water hoses.


http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/JF1l3MARGHn-Cd4XovGhEg?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

Carefully reattach the oil pressure sensor wire to the sensor (it is U shaped and fits in only one orientation).

To avoid abrasion between the fittings and the hot water hoses I cut some roofing aluminum into oblong shaped tabs and wrapped the pieces around the hoses and between the fittings (they are the brown pieces below)and then siliconed them in place. This is a must otherwise the fittings will abraid and eventually wear through the hoses. The aluminum pieces must wrap around at least half of the hose and separate the hose from the fittings. When you're sure they are in the right place pump in (or use your fingers) the silicon. Here is a picture of the results:

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/hoL7O495Mx-v37o_96OXRw?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink



The hydraulic hoses should be tied together with plastic cable ties and also fastened to the cowling above the radiator.

The cowling in the wheel well has a vent for cooling the disk brakes which butts up against the bypass filter. If I had mounted the filter higher by bolting it onto the car frame this could have been prevented. Instead I used a dremel cutter to partially cut out a circle in the cowling about the same size as the bypass filter and directly below it. I kept the plastic cutout connected to the main cowling to provide some protection to the filter element. With this hole the cowling fit properly. I then cut and bent a small piece of heavy guage aluminum and screwed it onto the lower plastic bar of the cowling in order to force the round plastic cutout against the bottom of the filter to allow more air to move by and into the wheel well (to cool the brakes when necessary). Here is the result:


http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/r4z5dmJxmR0TBpwNrEPsPQ?authkey=Gv1sRgCOfktP_di5PSLA&feat=directlink

Compared to my original, relatively easy bypass installation on the Golf this was a much more difficult job taking about 10 hours to complete. A couple of things leave me less than satisfied; the need for abrasion protection between the hot water hoses and the oil sensor and the requirement to mount the bypass filter outside of the engine compartment in a location where it could more easily be compromised.

Nevertheless it is filtering quite nicely with no leaks and, who knows, it may still be doing so when the odometer passes the half million mile mark. If and when that happens without any undue side effects due to the installation I will look back and be quite satisfied.

Regards,

John Sloan
 
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Dieselgeek

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Oct 3, 2000
Location
San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
TDI
2016 Golf TDI
If I was to ever make a bypass for the CBEA engine it would mount to one of my Panzer skid plate mounting posts. I would try to get the mount on the engine side of the post if there was room. I also thought of making a mount to attach to the engine side of the Panzer skid plate right under the stock filter housing. That would keep the lines short. Requiring the use of a skid plate seems necessary since there is almost no space to mount anything in the '09 engine bay.
 

CMB430

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Location
HQ of "get nothing done"
TDI
2009 Jetta TDI
Well done. In November I may take on this project and do it like you did or something similar. Thank you for taking the time to provide the Forum with priceless information. Now all we need is a vendor to offer the kit at a good price.
 

wjdell

Top Post Dawg
Joined
May 17, 2006
Location
Central Florida
TDI
06 Jetta TDI DSG PKG 1 17" VV Campy White/Beige
by pas filter is the best mod out - i will put by pass filters on every car i ever own - you can run long intervals and worry free
 

Tarbe

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2002
Location
USA
TDI
Touareg and Sportwagon Sold to VW
Good job!

Want to come to Houston now and do mine? :)
 

CMB430

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Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Location
HQ of "get nothing done"
TDI
2009 Jetta TDI
Okay, I have been doing quite a bit of reading, as usual, and think I am going to take a plunge. There are a few questions that are aimed at Corrado TDI and HekaweJohn...because they have first hand knowledge.

Could I run a 1.5qt by-pass filter, or is there not enough room? Is there anything different either of you would do besides trying to keep the by-pass inside the engine bay? Did you examine placing the by-pass filter toward the rear of the vehicle and running longer lines or is that not an option? Would it be worth considering placing the battery in the trunk and putting the filter set-up in its place?

With a 10+ year plan on our VWs...retirement goals, which is why we no longer have the big trucks we loved...I am willing put about $1,000 between the two and put the by-pass and plate on the TDI, and the plate on her Rabbit. I would do the actual work in November, but would order the parts well in advance.

Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

Dieselgeek

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Oct 3, 2000
Location
San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
TDI
2016 Golf TDI
In my opinion, the 1 quart Amsoil EaBP90 bypass filter is more than adequate for a 2 liter engine. You also will have a hard time finding the space for a larger unit since the 1 quart is a tight squeeze. Here's a shot of an EaBP90 with filter cap nested inside the right side MK5 front Panzer mounting post:



I would always try to keep line lengths as short as possible to reduce the chances for a rub on something else.
 

CMB430

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Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Location
HQ of "get nothing done"
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2009 Jetta TDI
Well, looks like I will follow suit...perhaps I will be number 2 to do this.

Corrado TDI, I will contact you when I am ready to buy the skid plates...maybe by then you will have the fender metal for the '09s as I did not see it on your Site.
 

Dieselgeek

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor , w/Business number
Joined
Oct 3, 2000
Location
San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
TDI
2016 Golf TDI
CMB430 said:
...Corrado TDI, I will contact you when I am ready to buy the skid plates...maybe by then you will have the fender metal for the '09s as I did not see it on your Site.
By "fender metal" do you mean Full Metal Jacket for MK5? If so, there is not a need since the MK5 is completely different from the MK4. Only the MK4 can use the FMJ setup.
 

HekaweJohn

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2001
Location
Devon
Is there sufficient room to unscrew the EaP 90 from the inside of the Panzer plate and lower it? It so then this would be a more preferred mounting point than mine which is outside of the skid plate mount.

The filter element can be mounted at up to a horizontal angle although Amsoil says vertical is best. This might provide more options in terms of where it can be mounted.

I would certainly avoid running hydraulic hose from any other location than the front of the car. Not only is the hose very expensive but the more unprotected hose the more prone it would be to puncture, friction wear etc.

Speaking of friction wear, for those undertaking this project, don't forget to manufacture aluminum shrouds to cover the radiator hose located near the filter tap. The last thing you want is a leaking radiator hose that has been worn through by the Amsoil tap or fittings.

John Sloan
 

Dieselgeek

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor , w/Business number
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2016 Golf TDI
The Panzer side mounting post is just tall enough to allow enough room to unscrew an EaBP90 bypass filter from its mount if the mount is attached at the very highest point. This a vertical mounting.
 

chops_555

Veteran Member
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Jul 29, 2008
Location
Texas
TDI
09 Jetta TDI 6spd manual Build date: 09/08
I just want to say that I would buy one. However, I totally understand that it doesn't make good business/economic sense to do all the r&d and put in the time and money into a bypass kit for just 6 people or so to buy it. All I am saying is that I would be a buyer.
 

Dieselgeek

TDIClub Enthusiast, Vendor , w/Business number
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San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
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The real problem in developing a new niche piece is when 50 people say they would buy one but five or ten actually do.

I have an idea on how to make a MK5 bypass elegantly and universally. I just don't know if there would be enough takers.
 

CMB430

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HQ of "get nothing done"
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2009 Jetta TDI
Thought I would revive an old thread...I had to go through 24 pages of my posts to find it because the search did not turn it up for me...not the right words I guess. I have not seen any vendors offer a kit for the CBEA.

As is the case with most men..I said I was going to do it and never did! But now that I have some evening free time in the desert I am making notes of my to-do stuff that I have put off too long.

If I missed something in my 45+ minutes of searching, please post a linky! Otherwise it is buying the pieces mentioned earlier in this thread.
 

CMB430

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Corrado...I am sure you could find some people. If I was not seperated from my Jetta by the Atlantic I would have already sent you my mailing address :) The 2.0 is going to be around for a while...there is $$ to be made. Let us know if you do come up with something!
 

meknc

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 26, 2010
Location
Hickory, NC
TDI
2010 JSW TDI
I found this thread too:

http://65.110.12.166/showthread.php?p=2968727#post2968727

but I'd love to have a bypass filter for my 2010 cbea. At this point I'm a little hesitant to persue the home brew version previously mentioned, but it may come to that when I get a little more time on my hands.

I'm a little closer to be a dummy, and I just installed a Panzer plate last weekend, but TX is still a drive from NC - though it is an excuse to visit some of our texas pals (but then again, texas is a BIG state!)
 
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