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Old December 27th, 2017, 16:41   #16
joetdi
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Do know someone with a heated garage you can use overnight?
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Old December 27th, 2017, 16:45   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Great advice but D2 is almost vaporware in Illinois. Better advice is to stick with pump fuel and not sweat the details. Illinois and Minnesota all have b something blends year round We need someone from Illinois to chime in here.
Yikes! Sorry, I used old terminology. Correct terminology would be: No. 2-D S15
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Old December 27th, 2017, 16:49   #18
turbobrick240
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Originally Posted by pdq import repair View Post
I have seen in cases where the vehicle can't be put inside, usually large trucks, where a small controlled fire is built under it to thaw it out. (old farmer trick)
That's how I thaw out the hydraulics on my tractor when water gets into the system. I use a propane burner though. Might not be a great idea for a car parked on the side of the street .
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Old December 27th, 2017, 16:53   #19
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People, please don't assume it's the fuel. As much as I dislike biodiesel I'm not ready to blame it at this point.

I had an instance in which I had a fuel blockage in one of my tractors that I can only believe to have been due to an ice pellet forming in the outlet from the tank: it happened last winter. Engine had been running and then quit. From then on it would start only for a few seconds and then die. I pulled the fuel line from the input side of the fuel filter and blew back toward the tank- initially felt an obstruction and then a quick drop in back pressure. I dumped in some Power Service White Bottle and didn't have another problem: I was pretty sure I didn't have debris in the tank (pretty new tractor); later on ran across a "Water In Fuel" condition, which then kind of supported my ice pellet theory- where the water came from is a complete unknown (I have a water filter on my fuel storage tank- none of my other vehicles have had any water issues- my other tractor has a clear filter bowl and no water showing up ever in that).
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:02   #20
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Minnesota reduces the mandated bio percentage in "winter" and most "winterized" pump fuel is well treated with additives for expected seasonal extremes. I'm sure different states depending on the expected temps and political/social attitudes have various policies.
I had -29*F at home this morning and it was officially -42*F between here and the Canadian border. My non-heated garage was a bit above 10F and the Jetta starts/runs fine. Been driving all over today. My main fuel source (Holiday) has the dates and treatment levels posted at the pump. Dec 15-Feb 1 it's treated for -40F, supposedly. A liberal dose of PowerService white bottle winter formula or Lucas anti-gell for good measure. I've had a few gelling "events" over the years and most of the time it was an unusual early cold spell with prior fuel in the tank, fuel from unfamiliar source, and a few random occurrences that may have been combinations of the above. I also have a CAT fuel filter and every gell event was in the filter (pickup unit modded/drilled many years ago). I think the finer filteration system either is a bit more prone to clogging up or the recirculation of warm return fuel thru it isn't as effective as the OEM unit. Perhaps, maybe.
Water in fuel is a very big real deal. Fuel may be "treated" for extreme cold but water freezes at relatively "normal" 32F/0*C. Not very cold at all. Ice in the fuel line is a deal breaker-game over until it's dealt with. A good additive designed to handle this on a regular basis is your best defense at keeping it out of your fuel system. Not going to promote a particular brand, turns into something like an oil thread....
If the OP can get the majority of the bio out of the tank (suggest finding warm place, pulling the pick up unit out and draining it thru the port) and add a 6 gallon can of straight #1 or kerosene (go to a real truck stop, they almost always have a pump for #1) and then fire it up and drive to fill up with seasonal "winterized" diesel fuel. Toss in a good dose of additive. Probably good time for new fuel filter. Should be good to go.
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Last edited by jettawreck; December 27th, 2017 at 17:12.
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:14   #21
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Wait until summer and stop using bio.
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:16   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdq import repair View Post
I have seen in cases where the vehicle can't be put inside, usually large trucks, where a small controlled fire is built under it to thaw it out. (old farmer trick)
I had a friend years ago that drove heavy equipment ( Cats, scrapers, and whatever earth moving stuff. They would light a fire under the underside and eventually, it would fire up...........do you really suggest that with a passenger car?
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:20   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jettawreck View Post
Minnesota reduces the mandated bio percentage in "winter" and most "winterized" pump fuel is well treated with additives for expected seasonal extremes. I'm sure different states depending on the expected temps and political/social attitudes have various policies.
I had -29*F at home this morning and it was officially -42*F between here and the Canadian border. My non-heated garage was a bit above 10F and the Jetta starts/runs fine. Been driving all over today. My main fuel source (Holiday) has the dates and treatment levels posted at the pump. Dec 15-Feb 1 it's treated for -40F, supposedly. A liberal dose of PowerService white bottle winter formula or Lucas anti-gell for good measure. I've had a few gelling "events" over the years and most of the time it was an unusually early cold spell with prior fuel in the tank, fuel from the unfamiliar source, and a few random occurrences that may have been combinations of the above. I also have a CAT fuel filter and every gell event was in the filter (pickup unit modded/drilled many years ago). I think the finer filtration system either is a bit more prone to clogging up or the recirculation of warm return fuel thru it isn't as effective as the OEM unit. Perhaps, maybe.
Water in fuel is a very big real deal. Fuel may be "treated" for extreme cold but water freezes at relatively "normal" 32F/0*C. Not very cold at all. Ice in the fuel line is a deal breaker-game over until it's dealt with. A good additive designed to handle this on a regular basis is your best defense at keeping it out of your fuel system. Not going to promote a particular brand, turns into something like an oil thread....
If the OP can get the majority of the bio out of the tank (suggest finding warm place, pulling the pick up unit out and draining it thru the port) and add a 6 gallon can of straight #1 or kerosene (go to a real truck stop, they almost always have a pump for #1) and then fire it up and drive to fill up with seasonal "winterized" diesel fuel. Toss in a good dose of an additive. Probably the good time for a new fuel filter. Should be good to go.
You have been the most helpful so far....not explaining what the OP should not do but what he should do now.
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:22   #24
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I'm betting on the fuel filter being clogged with bio-diesel turned to wax....

I've used a propane torch on my MK1s back in the day, slightly going over various things to raise the temp above 32f.

In this case, I'd start with the fuel filter ..... flaming it ever so slightly. Then go to something else, such as the steel pressure lines from the IP head over to the top of the injectors.... flash the side of the IP head for split second, and so on! Considering the IP case is aluminum and very cold, I'd not flash it due to the possibility of cracking. And, the IP does contain seals and electrical parts (which can stand a lot of heat, BTW).

Do the flaming back and forth only allowing the flame to be in one spot for a couple of seconds. Do the procedure numerous times going back to the filter, etc., until things are warm inside.

At some point, with the torch off, you should pull the T out of the fuel filter and make sure it is full of fuel. Then, proceed to prime the system as no doubt the Injectors will need to be bled. (Warm fuel would be helpful too.)

The above procedures most likely will need to be repeated. However, the second go around can be hazardous due to any spilt diesel fuel..... take extreme caution!

Otherwise, the heated garage that has been suggested would be my next option. Pulling the fuel intake thingy from the fuel tank is a very messy procedure under the best conditions.

Side note: I've seen my neighbor do this procedure with his Diesel International tractor several times down through the years!
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:25   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UhOh View Post
People, please don't assume it's the fuel. As much as I dislike biodiesel I'm not ready to blame it at this point.
due to an ice pellet forming in the outlet from the tank: it happened last winter. Engine had been running and then quit. From then on it would start only for a few seconds and then die.
This is when you use Power Service 911
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:46   #26
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This is when you use Power Service 911
IF one knows it's a fuel issue (not debris, something foreign to the fuel itself). As I'd stated earlier, first I'd look to uncork the line to the filter and blow back through it toward the tank (just as I did with my tractor).

Apologies if I get mixed up on the Power Service stuff (what the names of the bottles are- I think it's the white bottle that I got and used), as I have only ever had to use it the one time: some in the tank of the tractor and then the rest into my storage tank- the tank had summer fuel in it; I've now got a winter blend fuel in my storage tank, so I should be good (not require any additives).
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:54   #27
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Side note: I've seen my neighbor do this procedure with his Diesel International tractor several times down through the years!
Here we go again.......a tractor, not a passenger car. The best option is a heated garage even if you have to have the car towed, then change the fuel filter and add the kerosene to the fuel. And motor on and use winterized pump fuel.
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Old December 27th, 2017, 17:56   #28
MichaelB
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Originally Posted by narongc73 View Post
Wait until summer and stop using bio.
This is the most helpful post give me a break!
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Old December 27th, 2017, 18:53   #29
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IF one knows it's a fuel issue (not debris, something foreign to the fuel itself).
I guess a normal person would assume that if it is below 0F it was either gelled fuel or ice, not debris. PS 911 is just for ice as it contains alcohol, not something you want to add as a prophylactic just for an emergency to get you going PS white is an anti gell cetane boost and water displacement additive. Good stuff I may say and recommended for year-round use by DBW here on these forums.

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Old December 27th, 2017, 19:28   #30
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MichaelB, did you read all of my post?

Did you see where others mentioned farmers and their Tractors?

It ain't here we go again, it's an idea to consider since the car appears to be somewhere a mile away from the OPs home on the side of the road and he said no heated garage is available.

I bet I could have it running right there on the side of the road in less than hour!

(bio-diesel and temps in the teens........ no rocket science here)

My bet still stands,,,
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