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General Automotive General automotive discussion. This is intended to be a discussion about other not VW and Diesel cars you may have or interested in.

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Old September 23rd, 2015, 18:17   #31
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Some N.E. power providers do offer peak/off-peak. My present (last month's bill) is $0.1296/kwh peak, $0.0673/kwh off-peak.

The problem is that the night power mix is less green, a higher percent of fossil fuel due to near zero solar and less wind than in the day. Yeah it's cheaper to buy, but the ecological cost is higher.
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Old September 23rd, 2015, 20:03   #32
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With TOU around here, you have to jump through loops to get it and if you do, you can't get the cheaper rate until it's after 9:00 PM. It's almost like they don't want you get it.
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Old September 24th, 2015, 17:54   #33
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off-peak for me is 11 pm to 6 am, so yeah, it's not when I (and others) use a big chunk or power, but I guess that's why it's called "off peak", innit?
We'll save clothes drying on rainy, cloudy, windless weeks for night time machine drying, and leave the de-humidifier on the timer for summer nights.

Oh, and the FrostHeater is on a timer as well.
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Old September 24th, 2015, 19:41   #34
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There certainly are cost differences for peak vs off-peak, and the utilities do what they can to minimize their cost.

not everyplace shares the incentives. one motivator for them to do so is where expansion of the system is very expensive, and having use pricing helps put off the day when they will have to invest in the increased capability. (or have it end up wasted as more folks move to rooftop solar, more wind......so on and so on...)

One major benefit to having or price motivating BEVs charge at night is that the added customer base comes without any need for increasing the distribution system capability. at least as these get started, this makes huge sense.
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Old September 24th, 2015, 21:06   #35
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Our local DWP in Los Angeles offers a time of use meter, but it's not worth it.
First there's a service charge of 8.00 monthly for a minimally lower night rate (I forget the exact numbers), but it's not enough less per KWH unless you use practically nothing during the day. It would likely end up costing me more. It costs 2.40 to charge for 42-45 miles at peak tier 3 summertime rates. Wintertime might drop to a little over half that since the tier 3 rate structure goes away. Not a lot of savings at our electric rates, but it's the principal.
Once you go time of use they absolutely hose you for anything you use during daytime peak hours. I guess it could work for people whose homes are vacant from 8-5, but that isn't the case in our house.

We just choose to charge the Volt every time we park it. It's only run on gas a couple of times briefly. I'd say we easily will go 4000 or more on a tank the way we use it currently. It's intended to be a local errand car, and serves that purpose nicely.

Volts are designed with water cooled batteries that are designed to change their charge state as gradually as possible, and don't need to deep cycle since they have a backup generator.
As a result, the Volt batteries have ben proven to retain their performance and battery degradation is almost non existent. The batteries will never need to be replaced on most Volts.

I know the car has a higher carbon footprint to manufacture initially since it has both an ICE and a battery pack, but that disadvantage should go away as the car is used as opposed to a conventional car since the battery is likely a one time aquisition.
Pretty hard to calc out, but I'd bet the amount of electricity used to get fuel in a conventional car is not trivial. Consider that pumping out the crude is probably electric (unless it comes from a high pressure well), transportation to the refinery may be pumped through a pipeline, and I'll bet the amount of electricity used at the refinery isn't trivial. Then it usually goes into another electrically pumped pipeline as a refined fuel. The terminal where it's offloaded and retailers mix in their additives uses a fair amount of electric, and then after it's trucked to the fueling station electricity is used again to operate pumps, lights, and everything else at the service station.

Having an electric that I fill at home eliminates a lot of steps in the carbon cycle, and at least here we don't make the electric with a refined fuel such as fuel oil. Natural gas is less energy intensive to produce than refined fuels. Some of our juice comes from the one remaining nuke plant and whatever we are able to produce with solar. I guess the carbon footprint of making solar panels is another topic.
I guess especially with what's happened with VW the last week, the jury is still out on just how eco friendly my TDI Passat is. I'm convinced the Volt is once you get beyond initial manufacture.

Most of my satisfaction comes from using less of a resource that comes from countries run by madmen that would rather chop my head off than say 'Thank You'.
In each case, I could have gotten more conventional car for the money
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Old September 26th, 2015, 09:08   #36
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Power supply for Ontario Canada:
http://www.ieso.ca/Pages/Power-Data/default.aspx#supply

-Nuclear (base load)
-Natural Gas (peaking)
-Hydro
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Old September 26th, 2015, 14:44   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sooner View Post
I wonder how a college age family with four EV would charge at night? Since the power plants would be in full capacity mode all night long fossil fuel would have to be producing electricity. Wind less at night and solar is well...I just wonder about the net energy needed.

EV needed subsidized to get off the ground. The govt picks winners and losers. Think blackberry. Think ethanol. Think NOx 0.04 gram per km which for average fleet requires pretty expensive components if diesel in the mix. NOx was simply a manner to outlaw diesels via economics. We didn't outlaw diesels we just created arbitrary guideline that manufacturers chose not to adhere to the EPA will say. Well VW did not at least for test years we know about and that has not pleased any of us. John Beale must be laughing his a-- off right now.
Mr Beale you mentioned here and earlier is a criminal, convicted and paying for his crimes, and while he was praised for work he did on some amendments to the clean air act, along with many more EPA scientific, administrative, and legal staff, he was not the main author of the clean air act. (as you previously suggested) his involvement was more along a sales and coordination function.

I suspect that this detail is not of interest to you, but wanted to point this out for the record (why, I do not know)
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Old September 26th, 2015, 14:47   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sooner View Post
I wonder how a college age family with four EV would charge at night? Since the power plants would be in full capacity mode all night long fossil fuel would have to be producing electricity. Wind less at night and solar is well...I just wonder about the net energy needed..
So you've just not thought about it enough. Cars charging at night balances the electrical grid, it will actually have a lot of beneficial properties. Don't worry about simultaneous charging, you'll be able to schedule them at different times. Electricity generation needs to be addressed in a big way in general, but night charging is not going to be that big of a deal.
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Old September 26th, 2015, 15:00   #39
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Originally Posted by tsingtao View Post
Coal may be falling as a percentage but natural gas fired plants produce NOx also.
Quote:
In 2012, the average NOx emission intensity of a natural gas power plant with combined cycle was 7% of that of a coal power plant. The NOx emissions from a modern natural gas power plant with combined cycle can be much more efficiently controlled than those from a coal power plant. The SO2 emissions intensities of natural gas power plants with combined cycle are very low, due to the low sulfur content of natural gas, and did not show a decrease between 1997 and 2012. In 2012, the average SO2 emission intensity of a natural gas power plant with combined cycle was 0.2% of that of a coal power plant.
Coal is just some horrible horrible ****.
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Old September 26th, 2015, 18:01   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsingtao View Post
Coal may be falling as a percentage but natural gas fired plants produce NOx also.
From eGRID 2005

National average is 20 lbs NOx per 20 GWh production
States vary by tremendous amounts -- about 10 fold.

Arithmetic:
20 Lbs is 9.1 Kg, or 9.1 * 10^6 mg
20 GWh is 20 * 10^6 Kwh
A KWh pushes an EV about 2.5 miles (plant to wheels)

So mg/mile NOx emissions for a national grid EV =
(9.1 * 10^6) / (5 * 10^7) = ~ 0.2 mg/mile

Seems way too low. Corrections anyone ?

Addendum:
From Table 4 of an NREL study



Now my arithmetic says 500 mg/mile. I hope that is wrong.

Last edited by SageBrush; September 26th, 2015 at 18:13.
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Old September 26th, 2015, 18:30   #41
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And last but not least, I found eGRID 2010 showing average national NOx at ~ 1.2 Lbs/MWh

That works out to 545454 mg/2500 miles for a 'national grid fueled EV,' or
218 mg/mile. This I believe. I think.


Last edited by SageBrush; September 26th, 2015 at 19:41.
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Old September 26th, 2015, 18:41   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SageBrush View Post
From eGRID 2005

National average is 20 lbs NOx per 20 GWh production
States vary by tremendous amounts -- about 10 fold.

Arithmetic:
20 Lbs is 9.1 Kg, or 9.1 * 10^6 mg
20 GWh is 20 * 10^6 Kwh
A KWh pushes an EV about 2.5 miles (plant to wheels)

So mg/mile NOx emissions for a national grid EV =
(9.1 * 10^6) / (5 * 10^7) = ~ 0.2 mg/mile

Seems way too low. Corrections anyone ?

Addendum:
From Table 4 of an NREL study



Now my arithmetic says 500 mg/mile. I hope that is wrong.
Another poster today was doing the same math. The poster claimed NOx from the worst coal plant to be 4lbs per MWh and discounted it by 39% to account for the amount of US power generated by coal (wiki source). That poster's math came out to .236 g/mile for electric power vehicle.

If you look at a wiki page and generate a composite avg of coal and gas at the rates wiki shows and % generated from them it came out in about the same place as that prior poster's assumptions.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossil-fuel_power_station
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Old September 26th, 2015, 19:00   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SageBrush View Post
From eGRID 2005

National average is 20 lbs NOx per 20 GWh production
States vary by tremendous amounts -- about 10 fold.

Arithmetic:
20 Lbs is 9.1 Kg, or 9.1 * 10^6 mg
20 GWh is 20 * 10^6 Kwh
A KWh pushes an EV about 2.5 miles (plant to wheels)

So mg/mile NOx emissions for a national grid EV =
(9.1 * 10^6) / (5 * 10^7) = ~ 0.2 mg/mile

Seems way too low. Corrections anyone ?

Addendum:
From Table 4 of an NREL study



Now my arithmetic says 500 mg/mile. I hope that is wrong.
I think I see the error - 20lbs per GWh is NO2, not NOx. Go back to page 1, the data shows US avg for NOx to be 1.9 lbs per MWh to 1.5 lbs per MWh depending on the ozone season or not. I don't know where in that you see 20 lbs per 20 GWh, but I see 20lbs NO2 per GWh
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Old September 26th, 2015, 19:23   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SageBrush View Post
And last but not least, I found eGRID 2010 showing average national NOx at ~ 1.2 Lbs/MWh

That works out to 545454 mg/2500 miles for a 'national grid fueled EV,' or
218 mg/mile. This I believe. I think. I'll add a photo after Imgur lets me upload.
Looks like the NOx from electric generation is dropping.. from the 2005 link you posted. That's good news.

But still this .218g/mile is 3x over 0.07 g/mile. Why no uproar, how is good in relation to the standard?
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Old September 26th, 2015, 19:29   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hikertdi View Post
I think I see the error - 20lbs per GWh is NO2, not NOx.
Thank you! I found that same error a little while ago. I followed up with what I think is a correct calculation later. Somewhere in the range of 200 mg/mile for an EV charging off an 'average US grid.'

I knew the grid is dirty (and particularly so in my locale,) but you know something is way wrong when cars are cleaner than a central power facility. I wish I could do more at home. I'm limited by being in a rental.
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