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VW MKIII-A3/B4 TDIs This is a discussion about MKIII-A3/MkIII Jetta/Golf (<99.5) and B4 Passats (96,97) TDI's. Non TDI related postings will be moved or removed.

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Old November 26th, 2010, 06:29   #1
Got Smoke?
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Default Suggestions on removing stuck lug nuts/wheels?

I Just left my local gateway trying to get my tires rotated & balanced but they couldn't get any of my pass side lug nuts loose? Drivers side all came out but wheels were very hesitant to come (they actually didn't come off, manager came & got me and showed me).

Car came from New York and has A LOT of rust.

I'm thinking PB blaster in the lug holes and on the back of the rim several times a day, any other idea's?

Thanks!
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Old November 26th, 2010, 13:54   #2
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Rap them dead on with a hammer, maybe some heat with a soldering torch, PB blaster', Acetone and automatic transmissin fluid mix squirted on bolts, torch till hot then cold water a few times. GL
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Old November 26th, 2010, 14:01   #3
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how were they trying to get them off??, air impact?

i have always found that using an old fashioned lug nut wrench is the best way to go with stubborn lugs, .......

ballance yourself and then bounce up and down on it.......

or is it the actual tire that is stuck on??? like the lugs are out and you can't get the rims off?
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Old November 26th, 2010, 14:43   #4
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I have a four foot cheater bar for such problems.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 14:50   #5
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Originally Posted by pbraunton View Post
how were they trying to get them off??, air impact?

i have always found that using an old fashioned lug nut wrench is the best way to go with stubborn lugs, .......

ballance yourself and then bounce up and down on it.......

or is it the actual tire that is stuck on??? like the lugs are out and you can't get the rims off?
I went in for a balance & rotate and front end inspection. The guy in the shop started at one corner with an air impact and was going all the way around taking the lug bolts loose. Both front & rear drivers side bolts all came out no problem, but none of the passenger side front bolts budged. He managed to get one loose on the passenger side rear, about this time the managed noticed his trouble went out inspected and then came and got me.

They were concerned with the bolts breaking on a Friday and the day after a holiday and possibly needing parts if they did break. So I agreed with them to stop all work and just put the drivers side bolts back in.

We did attempt to pull the drivers wheel off to inspect the brake pads, but it was extremely hesitant to come off and did not actually come off.

Sorry I didn't explain further earlier this morning I had just left the shop & had about 30 minutes to get to a dentist apt and was posting from my phone.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 14:51   #6
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A 3' long 1/2"dr. breaker bar and a 17 MM socket.

Then when you get the lug bolts removed and the wheel is still "stuck" on.
You'll need to get a good size sledge hammer. You'll need to hit the INSIDE of the tire. Do not go about hitting the rim or you will likely bend the edge of the wheel and it will cause an air leak and you'll be buying a new rim / wheel

After you do get the wheel / rim removed you will need to remove the built-up corrosion from the center hole as well as the hub area where the wheel is mounted.
You can apply wax or other high temp compound to prevent the return of corrosion.
There is a service notice on this issue with referanes to the type of corrosion preventative compound (do not use grease).
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Old November 26th, 2010, 14:58   #7
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Default Stuck lugs...

If you rotate the tires regularly, and if you don't over-torque the lugs bolts when you put them on, you won't have any problems in the future.

To get the lugs off this time, I would go with heat and an impact wrench. Nothing beats the many-many-many impacts breaking loose the rust and crud, IN LINE with the bolt.

With hand wrenches and cheater bars and long pipes, you apply side-ways torque and can risk breaking the bolt(s).

Good luck!

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Old November 26th, 2010, 15:37   #8
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After you do get the wheel / rim removed you will need to remove the built-up corrosion from the center hole as well as the hub area where the wheel is mounted.
You can apply wax or other high temp compound to prevent the return of corrosion.
There is a service notice on this issue with referanes to the type of corrosion preventative compound (do not use grease).

OH TRUST ME! Once I get these buggers off they are ALL getting thoroughly cleaned at the matting surfaces!
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Old November 26th, 2010, 15:39   #9
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If you rotate the tires regularly, and if you don't over-torque the lugs bolts when you put them on, you won't have any problems in the future.
Haven't even owned this car a month yet, was trying to get the first in a schedule of R&B's. The tires on the front of the car have noticeable wear, and the rear tires look BRAND NEW so with the weather about to turn bad here in TN soon I was trying to get the tires with more tread on the front.

Once I get them off and cleaned, I don't anticipate a problem! Was just looking for suggestions to avoid breakge! The car is originally from New York with doesn't help!
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Old November 26th, 2010, 15:42   #10
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... with the weather about to turn bad here in TN soon I was trying to get the tires with more tread on the front.
Actually, for nasty weather, it's advised to have the deeper tread on the rear wheels in front-wheel-drive cars... go figure... (and "snow" tires really do make a difference... the rubber compound is engineered for better traction in cold and freezing weather...)

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Old November 26th, 2010, 17:08   #11
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Actually, for nasty weather, it's advised to have the deeper tread on the rear wheels in front-wheel-drive cars... go figure... (and "snow" tires really do make a difference... the rubber compound is engineered for better traction in cold and freezing weather...)

Yuri
Well if there's A LOT of snow on the ground I'll be jumping in the 99 Cummins on 33's or my 79 Chevy on 35's.

Just trying to get the car in the shape it needs to be in. While the PO did a decent job its just time for a few things... R&B..and did a oil & fuel filter change yesterday.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 20:13   #12
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I prefer an impact wrench. Long ago I was told by an experienced mechanic that since it is applying torque along the axis of the bolt, all facets of the bolt head are receiving the same amount of torque and there is less likely to be stripping of the bolt head (you are less likely to slip off the bolt head). With a wrench and/or cheater you are applying force from one side and if the wrench or socket slips you are more likely to strip the bolt head.

I apply antiseize to the bolts or lugs. I also apply antiseize to the mating surface on the hub so the wheel is less likely to freeze to the hub due to corrosion.

Now, even though I prefer an impact wrench, I have and frequently use my 1/2" socket set with a cheater bar since it is easier to carry out to the car as opposed to cleaning the garage to get the car close to the air compressor!!

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Old November 27th, 2010, 03:46   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Got Smoke? View Post
The tires on the front of the car have noticeable wear, and the rear tires look BRAND NEW so with the weather about to turn bad here in TN soon I was trying to get the tires with more tread on the front...
I hope you know to keep the better tyres on the back of all cars (4WD, FWD and RWD) (AWD cars need to have the same wear on all tyres.)

You need the best tyres on the back to provide the best handling in an emergency. With the best tyres on the front during an emergency the back end will loose grip first and will slide around to the front so you are looking where you have been and now where you are going. That pretty much eliminates any chance of you being able to control the car.
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Old November 27th, 2010, 03:58   #14
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Put the best tires on the front and even them up. even though you said they had wear you did not say they were bald. The next things these jokers will tell you after you leave the best ones on the rear and wear the front ones out completely is that tires need to be changed as a set of 4 and that the tires on the back that still have some life in them should be thrown away.
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Old November 27th, 2010, 05:40   #15
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This works on steel wheels. I have never done it on aluminum wheels.

On bolt type wheels BolaB4V post #2 has the correct idea. The hit into the bolt end actually compresses the wheel metal and allows the bolt to come out after soaking.

On stud and nut type wheels you need a steel bar / shaft with a recess drilled larger than the stud threads. Carefully holding the bar centered on the stud hit the end of the bar.

The natural compression of the tightened fastner plus the hit actually bends the steel wheel. I do not know how much an aluminum wheel would like this process.

Realize over use of this process destroys bearings and breaks things.

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