www.tdiclub.com

Economy - Longevity - Performance
The #1 Source of TDI Information on the Web!
Forums Articles Links Meets
Orders TDI Club Cards TDIFest 2014 Gone, but not forgotten VAG-Com List Unit Conversions TDIClub Chat Thank You



Go Back   TDIClub Forums > TDI Model Specific Discussions Areas > VW MKIV-A4 TDIs (VE and PD)

VW MKIV-A4 TDIs (VE and PD) This is a general discussion about A4/MkIV Jetta (99.5-~2005), Golf(99.5-2006), and New Beetle(98-2006). Both VE and PD engines are covered here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 17th, 2009, 18:05   #1
scurvy
Good Ol' Boy
 
scurvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Matteson IL USA
TDI(s): 2006 Golf
Fuel Economy: ☭☠
Default How to replace your MkIV's front wheel bearings

How to Change a Front Wheel Bearing on a MkIV A-Platform VW in Eleven Million Easy Steps.

I took these pictures to illustrate the process of removal & replacement of a bad front wheel bearing in my 2006 Golf GLS TDI, as I was sick and tired of the constant noise. Mine was worst at about 35 - 40 mph, which is right about normal city speed for me. Man, that was annoying.

I've also seen writeups that require $500 specialized pullers. I intended this to be cheaper to do for the occasional home mechanic. You can get everything you need to do this for about $100 if you had to buy it all from scratch. Another $50 for supplies and a wheel bearing kit and it's still only half the cost of having a stealership do it for you.

Step 0: Diagnosis.
Once you've heard the "whrowhrowhrowhrowhrowhrow" groan of a bad wheel bearing, you'll never forget it. But if you've never heard it, it usually manifests itself as a deep groaning noise that increases tempo with speed. It sounds very similar to a square tire. It will often go away when turning right or left. This is usually the way to diagnose which front bearing is bad - conventional wisdom is that if the noise goes away when you turn left (and thereby load the driver's side bearing and unload the passenger side bearing), then it is the passenger side bearing that is bad. This is often wrong and is almost always dumb! DUMB AS HELL. MkIV VWs have double-row angular contact bearings, so when you turn one way you unload one set of bearings and load the other set in the same bearing shell.

To be certain which one is bad, put the front end of the car up on jackstands. Put parking brake on. With car idling, put it in 5th gear and let the clutch out. The side with the bad bearing should be making that gawdawful racket. Disclaimer: this is dangerous. Don't get near the spinning wheels. Use good jackstands. Don't be stupid.

Tools:
Harbor Freight front wheel drive bearing removal kit, item 45210 EDIT: apparently superseded by item 66829 (although both appear on their 'new' website - check what your local store has in stock).
Big sockets to run the bearing removal kit - six point 28mm & 32mm (EDIT: MOGolf says a 27mm socket fits better on his. 28mm is quite snug on mine so check your own set before you start).
An impact gun really helps - I have a 110VAC electric one.
The longest breaker bar you can find that fits your big sockets. Two if you don't have an impact wrench.
30mm 12-point socket.
7mm hex key or allen wrench or hex wrench or allen key. Whatever you call it, it isn't a "standard" size in most hex sets.
Grease. I used Valvoline Synpower synthetic grease.
Beefy snap ring pliers.
A big 3-jaw puller.
A 5 pound slide hammer. Rent this from AutoZone - OEM 27033.
Some manner of Dremel-type rotary tool with a billion cutoff wheels. Seriously, more is always better than not enough.
Big hammer & cold chisel.
The usual assortment of hand tools, sockets, penetrating oil & beer.

Like most things that don't get "maintenance", this is divided up into four segments: Get to the bearing; Remove the old bearing; Put the new bearing in & put the stuff back together.

Part A: GET TO DA BEARING
Part B: Pull my strings.
Part C: P-p-p-push it! Push it real good!
Part D: I likes to torque-it, torque-it.

More information and pictures to follow.
__________________
You are entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.
mk4 front wheel bearing replacement | scurvy winter front | 2006 Golf TDI | 2012 Mazda 5 6MT | VCDS in Matteson, IL USA

Last edited by scurvy; April 29th, 2010 at 09:36. Reason: revised HF kit link
scurvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2009, 18:07   #2
scurvy
Good Ol' Boy
 
scurvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Matteson IL USA
TDI(s): 2006 Golf
Fuel Economy: ☭☠
Default Part A: GET TO DA BEARING

So, at this point I assume you have the necessary supplies, tools, a front wheel bearing kit and know which bearing is bad. Since I only get 10 pictures per post, I have skipped some of the easy steps. If you need help with those, get someone else to do this for you, seriously.
Put the front of the car up on jackstands. I prefer to put them under the subframe bolts.

Remove the wheel. Take out the 2 caliper retaining bolts (7mm hex - usually not in most hex key sets) and hang the brake caliper up out of the way.

Remove the brake disc retaining bolt - this may be easier to do with the brake caliper still on and someone holding the brakes or with a screwdriver stuck into the vents to keep the rotor from turning (thanks MOGolf!). Mine was a Torx, which was a rolling change from the Philips head used previously. You may need a hand impact driver and hammer. Remove the disc. Also remove the three bolts and the dust shield.

Bust loose the axle retaining nut with the 30mm 12-point socket on your impact gun. MOGolf reckons this may be easier to do with the car still on the ground with the wheel center cap removed - definetely the case if you don't have an impact. You may also want to stick a screwdriver in the vents to keep the disc from rotating if you haven't removed it yet.

Scribe lines around the balljoint plate on the underside of the control arm and remove the 3 bolts holding it in. Since I live in the rust belt, it was painfully obvious where it attached and it wasn't necessary. This will help you line up the balljoint so you won't necessarily need an alignment afterwards.

Assemble your big 3-jaw puller. Mine is a cheap six incher and worked fine. Squirt a little penetrating oil on the axle splines before you start and grease the threads of the puller. Have it grasp onto the meat of the hub, but not the ABS sensor wheel. Tighten the puller to push the axle out of the hub.


Once the steering knuckle is free of the axle, it will swing out of the way. Gently lay the axle/CV joint assembly down onto the top of the lower control arm.

Now, take your slide hammer and put the shaft through the wheel hub. Put one of the hardened washers from the wheel bearing removal kit on the end and put the nut on the end. The next bit took a bit of balance. Whilst seated on a milk crate, I held the slide hammer up with my right hand, propped a foot against the steering knuckle to put a little bit of tension on the hammer and moved the slide weight with my left hand. Fiddly, but it worked. Three sharp raps and it started to move. Another few and it came right out. As shown below, L -> R.
1: Nut.
2: Hardened washer.
3: Hub with inner race stuck on it.
4: Sliding hammer weight (used left hand to move).
5: Slide hammer handle (used right hand to hold).


And viola! The wheel bearing is exposed. The outboard inner race is stuck on the hub and the inboard bearings and cage are shown here, still installed in the steering knuckle.


Next, you get to remove the remainder of the bearing, and it's gonna fight you every step of the way.
__________________
You are entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.
mk4 front wheel bearing replacement | scurvy winter front | 2006 Golf TDI | 2012 Mazda 5 6MT | VCDS in Matteson, IL USA

Last edited by scurvy; January 2nd, 2013 at 10:43. Reason: minor fixes for clarification
scurvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2009, 18:08   #3
scurvy
Good Ol' Boy
 
scurvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Matteson IL USA
TDI(s): 2006 Golf
Fuel Economy: ☭☠
Default Pull my strings

Now that the wheel bearing is exposed, it's time to get that bastid outta there.
First, get the circlip out of the way. Mine was rusted in pretty well, but after I got one end out with circlip pliers, I was able to work a big screwdriver around to remove it.



Now pull out the bearing kit and start looking at the push discs what came with it. Pick the one that's just slightly smaller than the wheel bearing but fits in the hole in the back of the steering knuckle but will catch the outer shell of the bearing (you can check it against the exposed end of the bearing to be sure). Put the disc against the back of the wheel bearing with the raised center portion toward the bearing. Put the threaded rod through the bearing and disc with a washer between them, then one of the large tube pieces and a flat plate on it to form a cup. The bearing will get pushed into this cup. Then place a washer and the "long" nut that came with the kit. See the picture below - it was taken after the bearing was removed but better illustrates how to assemble the bearing removal kit. L -> R:

1. Nut welded onto the end of the threaded rod.
2. Hardened washer.
3. Bearing push disc (MOGolf says this is piece #13 from his kit).
4. Old wheel bearing.
5. Tube portion of cup (MOGolf suggests putting the thicker end against the steering knuckle).
6. Flat plate portion of cup.
7. Hardened washer.
8. Long nut.



Grease all the surfaces what touch each other and especially the threaded rod and the "long" nut (part 8 - the threaded part faces left in that picture). When assembled through the steering knuckle & remaining bearing, it will look like this:



Put the 28mm (or 27mm) six-point socket on the back, put on the longest breaker bar you've got and rest it on the floor. A chunk of wood under the end of the breaker bar isn't a bad idea. Snug up the "long" nut on the front with the 32mm six-point socket & another breaker bar or ratchet, keeping the "cup" flat and firm on the steering knuckle.
Put on your earmuffs, get out the impact gun and prepare thyself. This bearing will fight you every step of the way, and it will be a total pain in your rear. Don't give up hope. It took nearly a full minute of hammering on it with my Harbor Fart electric impact gun before it started to move. Once it starts to move, don't let up! Chase that bastard out while it's moving!
Eventually, it will come out. Or it won't, and you'll have to pull the steering knuckle out completely, take it to a machine shop and have them press the bearing out with a hydraulic press. Either way, once it's out, take a deep breath - the hard part's over.
But you still have to contend with the OTHER part of that damned bearing - the outboard inner race that's still stuck on the hub. You might get lucky and it may want to move on its own, so give it a little spray with penetrating oil.



The easiest way in my opinion to get this off is to slice down the side with a small cutoff wheel on your rotary tool of choice. Put it in a vise so you can hold it securely, and go easy and slow. Check it once in a while so you don't go too deep. You may be able to get it to move with a cold chisel and hammer after you've got a slot cut in the race. I had to cut all the way through mine to get it to budge. If you nick the hub slightly, it will be OK. Sand it lightly and try not to make it worse. I tried to use a small puller to remove the bearing race but to no avail. Cutting the race off is much easier and faster.
Below is the hub with the bearing race removed.



Now then, the REAL hard part is over. Clean up the steering knuckle bore with a wire brush to get it ready for the next part. Wipe off the ABS sensor with a rag while you're at it. Take a break; you've earned a wobbly pop.
__________________
You are entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.
mk4 front wheel bearing replacement | scurvy winter front | 2006 Golf TDI | 2012 Mazda 5 6MT | VCDS in Matteson, IL USA

Last edited by scurvy; August 24th, 2011 at 08:42. Reason: clarification, spelling
scurvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2009, 18:08   #4
scurvy
Good Ol' Boy
 
scurvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Matteson IL USA
TDI(s): 2006 Golf
Fuel Economy: ☭☠
Default Part C: P-p-p-push it! Push it real good!

Now that everything's out and clean, it's time for the 3rd step: Putting the sh!t back in the horse.

Remember that bearing push disc you used to remove the bearing? Put it back in the case. Now you need to pick one bigger than that, one that is just as big as the wheel bearing OD, possibly ever so slightly smaller. You could even use the old bearing you took out as the pushing disc if you wanted - you know it's the right size.

Put on your nitrile gloves, get two fingers of synthetic grease ready and really smear that grease in the steering knuckle bore. Get in in there good, but don't just glob it everywhere. A decent thin coat is better than a couple sloppy chunks.

Now you're going to assemble the kit to push the new bearing in place. Put one of the "tube" plates (IIRC, the smaller of the two) or one of the pusher discs and a flat washer on the back of the steering knuckle and put the threaded rod through it with the nut on the back. MOGolf suggests using plate #13 to push (the same one you used to remove the bearing) & #6 (the smaller of the two unnumbered plates) on the back.Then the new wheel bearing, the pusher plate and the long nut. Before you tighten up anything, read this statement: ONLY PUSH ON THE BEARING OUTER SHELL. DO NOT PUSH ON THE INNER RACE.

Reread that statement. Figure out which way to turn the bearing pusher plate. Grease the hardened washers and threaded rod again. Put it all together with the long breaker bar on the back. Snug up by hand, then by wrench or breaker bar. When you've got it all lined up, start pushing the new bearing in with quick bursts from the impact gun (earmuffs please!) - or by hand. MOGolf reports being able to get his back in entirely by hand. If you're pressing on the outer shell AND ONLY THE OUTER SHELL, the bearing will align itself somewhat and get pushed in. Push the bearing FULLY into the steering knuckle bore.
Before:


After (rear view):


Wipe up any of the excess grease and use it to give the bearing and steering knuckle a light coat of grease. Install the retaining circlip from your wheel bearing kit - my Bentley says to install it with the opening down, as shown.


Eagle-eyed readers will notice the bearing seals are differently colored in this last picture; that is because I was a MORON and forgot to install the circlip before pressing in the hub. So I had to make a flying trip to G&H Import Auto, buy a whole new bearing, re-remove the hub, re-remove the bearing and re-cut the inner race off the hub. Live and learn: don't forget the circlip.

Now flip the pushing discs around for installing the hub. These should ONLY press against the inner race of the bearing. Grease the inner surface of the bearing and/or the hub, line it up and press it through the bearing, similar to installing the bearing. Please remember when installing the bearing into the steering knuckle, only press on the OUTER SHELL of the bearing (with the pusher disc on the front; the one on the back should press against the steering knuckle). When installing the hub into the bearing only press on the INNER RACE of the bearing. DO NOT PRESS THE HUB INTO THE BEARING WITHOUT SUPPORTING THE BACK OF THE INNER RACE. This is why the pushing discs have a raised center portion! MOGolf suggests using the #13 plate on the backside of the bearing full-width flat side against the bearing.

Seat the hub fully through the bearing so the ABS encoder wheel is only a few millimeters from the ABS sensor. Make sure you didn't bend anything by spinning the hub by hand - it should move smoothly.


Nice. That's pretty much it for the bearing & hub.
__________________
You are entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.
mk4 front wheel bearing replacement | scurvy winter front | 2006 Golf TDI | 2012 Mazda 5 6MT | VCDS in Matteson, IL USA

Last edited by scurvy; November 15th, 2009 at 15:37. Reason: added MOGolf's notes
scurvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2009, 18:08   #5
scurvy
Good Ol' Boy
 
scurvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Matteson IL USA
TDI(s): 2006 Golf
Fuel Economy: ☭☠
Default Part D: I likes to torque-it, torque-it.

Now you just have to button everything back up.

Reinstall the brake caliper dust cover and the three 8mm bolts.

Put a light coat of grease on the hub splines and insert the stub axle through it. Don't let the other end come out of the transmission.

Put the balljoint bracket back in the control arm and line it up with the scribed lines or rust marks. Reinstall the three bolts, torque to 20 Nm + 1/4 turn. I used 25 Nm and called it even.

Replace the brake disc and install its retaining screw. Snug is good enough.

Replace the brake caliper and slider pins. Torque to 28 Nm.

Install the new 12 point nut on the axle shaft. My electric impact will really only run something up to about 100 ft-lbs or so, so I snugged it on very well.


Then put the wheel back on minus the center cap.

12 point nut torquing procedure, according to the Bentley:
Weight of the vehicle must be on its wheels.
First, tighten to 200 Nm.
Immediately loosen 1/2 turn.
Roll car to turn wheel 1/2 turn.
Tighten nut to 50 Nm + 1/6 turn.

I did this, but plus about 1/4 turn on the last tightening. This nut is one of the tightest on the car and there's virtually no downside to making it a bit tighter than spec. Some folks like to put a dab of blue loctite on the threads as well. I had one side installed without the weight of the car on the wheels solely with an air impact wrench on a medium torque setting - probably 200 ft-lbs or so. Both sides seem to be doing fine. Use your best judgement which one works best for you.

Enjoy your new, quiet car. Ahhh, blissfully silent!

Bad wheel bearing post-mortem inspection.
Here are some pictures of the bad wheel bearing after it spent a day in a parts washer. Notice the pitting & fretting on the races, all the corossion on the outer shell & how dull the balls appear:






Yeah, it was ugly. No wonder it was making a hell of a racket. Compare to the new bearing I had to remove after forgetting to install the circlip.


This is not a crazy difficult job, but there are a number of pitfalls. If you screw something up mid-stream, you'll have a car out of commission. If you're unsure about this in any way, or don't have a backup vehicle, or don't have ALL the tools, or don't have an afternoon to spend doing this the first time; DON'T DO IT. Take the car to a guru instead. If you're in the Chicago area, I can highly recommend jobob307 or JasonTDI.
__________________
You are entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.
mk4 front wheel bearing replacement | scurvy winter front | 2006 Golf TDI | 2012 Mazda 5 6MT | VCDS in Matteson, IL USA

Last edited by scurvy; November 15th, 2009 at 15:38. Reason: added content, MOGolf's suggestions
scurvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2009, 18:41   #6
iamstuffed
Veteran Member
 
iamstuffed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Francisco, CA
Default

Thanks in advance, for whenever I need to do mine!
__________________
My "vehicles":
2005 Golf GLS TDI 5spd manual - 2007 Bike Friday Tikit - 2008 Brompton M6R - 2008 Surly Crosscheck
iamstuffed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2009, 21:04   #7
thebigarniedog
Master of the Obvious
 
thebigarniedog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Fail Command (Central Ohio)
Default

Excellent write up.
__________________
When interviewed about why no diesel for the new F150, Ford responded to effect that diesel makes no sense in the 1/2 ton market. That brilliance should be repeated in every Ram 1500 eco-diesel commercial.

OCD TDICLUB MEMBER # 1
thebigarniedog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2009, 21:40   #8
greengeeker
 
greengeeker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Cambridge, MN
Fuel Economy: 42.2/50.0/58.1
Default

Nice pictures of the failed bearings. I've never pulled one apart to see how nasty they can get.

On really stuck snaprings it helps to hit the back of the snapring with a chisel to unseat it from its rusted groove. Do both sides.



When removing/installing the axle nut, leave the rotor installed and slide a screwdriver into one of the cooling ducts to counterhold against the caliper sliding surfaces. (for those without an impact)

A smaller, modified two-jaw puller will remove the inner race stuck on the hub.
__________________
- Nick -
02 Jetta TDI 250k (42.2/50.3/58.1 MPG) // 01 Eurovan 24V (18 MPG) // 00 TDI Ranger (39MPG)
How to Post Pics - How to Search
TDIclub trusted mechanic in Minnesota - PM me MY CALENDAR

Last edited by greengeeker; June 17th, 2009 at 21:49.
greengeeker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2009, 21:55   #9
onehotspud
Veteran Member
 
onehotspud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Fuel Economy: 59/45/36
Default

Amazing write-up! Thanks scurvy!
__________________
2001 Jetta TDI, Sprint 520s, RocketChip Stage III, G60 Flywheel & VR6 Clutch, Boost Gauge, DIY Boostvalve
Dieselgeek Shortshifter, Low Pixel Gasser MFA, VAG-COM (best tool & support ever), ECodes w/motors, SRP
ASR Retrofit.
A few steps closer to a CoolWht clone...
onehotspud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18th, 2009, 16:15   #10
Gearhead51
Veteran Member
 
Gearhead51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Suwanee (Atlanta), GA
TDI(s): 2000 Jetta
Default

I made that stuff out of plumbing supplies and threaded rod a few years back. It worked fine on my MK1. I wonder if it'll work on my MK4s.

I normally put my new bearings in the freezer before I start. That way, when it's time to put them in, they're slightly undersize. I also heat the knuckle a little with a propane torch or a heat gun before sliding them in. Most of the time, they'll slide in with minimal effort until the temperatures equalize, so go quickly. I also stick the hub in the freezer for the same reason, but I'm not heating the bearing with a propane torch. Ha ha.
__________________
'00 Silver Jetta TDI on Ground Control coilovers, Koni Yellows, B&M shifter, Audi R8 reps, and VNT20 ST2b. R520. '99.5 F350 with injectors, 4page chip, intake, and exhaust, '00 Honda RC51 in race plastics, Ducati 1098S, '94 RX7 436RWHP Rotary 4 life!
Gearhead51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2009, 11:40   #11
Kite Baron
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Central MA
Fuel Economy: 48 mpg on the 5 spd, 40 on the slushbox
Default

Scurvy,
Your write up includes the pictures left out by others. I spent most of yesterday afternoon trying to get the bearing out. Your slide hammer picture made it work. Mine took about 20 hits. The bearing pressed out with the HF kit no problem. Thanks for a great post.
__________________
Kite Baron
-+-+-+-+<>
2) 2003 Jetta TDI's
Diesel cars, truck, & tractor
Kite Baron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2009, 07:52   #12
VA2002TDI
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Virginia
TDI(s): 2002 Jetta
Default

Just replaced both wheel bearings on Saturday using scurvy’s procedure.
Everything went smooth – not a single expletive was shouted out!

Thanks for the great post scurvy!

BTW, when pulling the hub, I didn’t have a suitable hardened washer in my inventory so I used the old axle nut instead. Worked like a champ.

Steve
VA2002TDI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2009, 20:02   #13
scurvy
Good Ol' Boy
 
scurvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Matteson IL USA
TDI(s): 2006 Golf
Fuel Economy: ☭☠
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kite Baron
Your slide hammer picture made it work. Mine took about 20 hits.
Some of them can be quite stuck - when it comes to smacking the slide hammer, you've GOT to do it as hard as you possibly can and as many times as you can right off the bat. Glad to hear you got it out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by VA2002TDI
when pulling the hub, I didnít have a suitable hardened washer in my inventory so I used the old axle nut instead

Good to know that will work in a pinch. What did you use to press the bearing in or out with? My HF wheel bearing kit came with two of the hardened/plated washers.

scurvy
__________________
You are entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.
mk4 front wheel bearing replacement | scurvy winter front | 2006 Golf TDI | 2012 Mazda 5 6MT | VCDS in Matteson, IL USA
scurvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2009, 12:34   #14
VA2002TDI
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Virginia
TDI(s): 2002 Jetta
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by scurvy
Good to know that will work in a pinch. What did you use to press the bearing in or out with? My HF wheel bearing kit came with two of the hardened/plated washers.
I used the HF wheel bearing kit also but didn't open it up until after the hub was off and I forgot about the washers. Yep, one of the two washers in the kit would have worked. D'oh!
VA2002TDI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 22nd, 2009, 13:27   #15
SS930
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: CT shoreline
Default

Great write-up!

I'm not sure I have the time or the desire to spend the money on the tools needed to change my wheel bearings... any idea what the dealer charges for doing this job?
SS930 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 5 (0 members and 5 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:01.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright - TDIClub Online LTD - 2014
Contact Us | Privacy Statement | Forum Rules | Disclaimer
TDIClub Online Ltd (TDIClub.com) is not affiliated with the VWoA or VWAG and is supported by contributions from viewers like you.
© 1996 - 2013, All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.18853 seconds with 9 queries
[Output: 148.29 Kb. compressed to 125.42 Kb. by saving 22.87 Kb. (15.42%)]