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Go Back   TDIClub Forums > TDI Model Specific Discussions Areas > VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas

VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas Discussions area for A5/MkV Jetta/Golf (2005/2006 PD and 2009 CR).

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Old April 10th, 2007, 13:16   #46
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I should have said SOME of the V6 and V8 models. Oops.

As far as t-belts not stretching do this; take a new t-belt and a used t-belt for the same car and measure them. You will find that the used one has in fact stretched. Yes a chain will stretch as well but that is why there are automatic chain tensioners. You saw them on some belt systems as well to compensate for stretch.
As far as most inline 4's Nissan uses chains and I am reasonably sure that most of the other manufacturers do as well. A diesel valvetrain is under far less stress than a high revving gas engine. Simple reason-RPM.
Precision cam timing is important in many area's on a gas engine. Emissions, power, fuel mileage and driveability are all affected by it. You could even get an engine to run hotter if the cam timing was off.
In the future you will probably see VW go to chains on both gas and diesel engines as emissions regs get tighter.
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Old April 10th, 2007, 19:23   #47
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Let's see, the 2006 owner's manual says to change the belt at 90,000 and also has a listing for changing it at 100,000. The paper Bentley says to change the 2005 and 2006 belt at 80,000. The VW site says to change the 2005 belt at 100,000 and the 2006 at 80,000. They don't split the maintenance between the 2005 and the 2005.5.

If VW updated the timing belt on the earlier model to 100,000, why did they drop it to 80,000 for the newer model?
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Old April 11th, 2007, 08:09   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zanakas
Are the BRM tools the same as BEW?
Still waiting to hear back from the customer to see if the Metalnerd PD tool kit had everything required to do the job. I have not reviewed the procedure. The tensioner, belt, and roller are the same between all PD engine codes.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 09:32   #49
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Interesting. So why are VWoA and Bentley recommending an 80,000 mile interval? More forces on the cam or something?
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Old April 11th, 2007, 15:29   #50
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The Bentley I have states 100k for all PDs, in A4, A5, and B5 cars. This is the CD version. Alldata says the same (just checked ).

I have done several PDs at 100k. I think it is perfectly safe to do it then, as I have not seen any issues with them yet. These gave all been A4 chassis cars.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 16:53   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corrado tdi
Still waiting to hear back from the customer to see if the Metalnerd PD tool kit had everything required to do the job. I have not reviewed the procedure. The tensioner, belt, and roller are the same between all PD engine codes.
The BEW engine needs the T10050 to hold the crank. The BRM may need the T10100 to hold the crank depending on which crank pulley it has. To tell the difference you have to look at the pulley. If the TDC mark is at one of the bolt holes (as pictured in the BEW procedure I posted), it uses the T10050. If the mark is between bolt holes (1 o'clock position with engine at TDC), then it uses the T10100.

They also phased in a new tensioner that uses a hex key to adjust the tension instead of the two pin tensioner tool.

And the belt tensioning procedure is different. To do it right you need a counter hold tool for the cam pulley (T10172 is official tool) in a step that further pretensions the belt.

Since Deafbug can't follow my directions, I'll wait for him to post the BRM procedure.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 17:01   #52
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Another question, maybe a little off subject. I was considering, due to some of the horror stories I've heard, pulling the valve cover off when I do my timing belt and inspecting the lobes thoroughly...

I'm not quite there yet (52k), but I have to plan...

Oilhammer, have you had any of them off? I'd consider replacing the cam and/or rockers as insurance...
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Old April 12th, 2007, 03:25   #53
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No, I have not. Maybe pull the V.C. off at 100k and take a visual peak, though. Although if you are running the correct oil and the engine makes no unusual sounds then I might not worry about it.
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Old April 12th, 2007, 23:06   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8606
Some manufactures are going back to timing chains. If timing chains can cause damage like belts why would they go back to that design? Up till this thread, I thought timing chains were better than belts.

Here's the scary question (I don't believe anyone has asked yet). What can we expect to pay for a new timing belt installed?
I think the parts cost about 300. Did one last week. It was an 06, the guy put 95k miles in 9 months. The top 2 horizontal bolts for the engine mount to the engine block are longer than the other engines. You can remove the engine mount on the BRM engine. I will post some pics and more info later.
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Last edited by mtbr297; April 12th, 2007 at 23:33.
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Old April 12th, 2007, 23:12   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zanakas
Are the BRM tools the same as BEW?
The crank lock is different if it is a BRM uses t10100 for oval crank gear and t10050 for the BEW round crank gear. My local dealer said he could order the t10100 but I got mine from Metalnerd. I didn't see MoGolf's reply before I posted.
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Old April 13th, 2007, 09:26   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oilhammer
hevster, the new Toyota V6 and V8s use chains as well. Is your TIS access up to date?
Which Toyota V8 uses a chain?
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Old April 16th, 2007, 04:55   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gquenstedt
Which Toyota V8 uses a chain?
Both the 4.6L and the 5.7L each have a nightmarish network of FOUR chains, as do the 2.5L, 3.0L, 3.5L, and 4.0L GR series V6 engines.

There will also be a 5.0L chain drive V8 soon.
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Last edited by oilhammer; April 16th, 2007 at 04:58.
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Old April 16th, 2007, 10:38   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oilhammer
Both the 4.6L and the 5.7L each have a nightmarish network of FOUR chains, as do the 2.5L, 3.0L, 3.5L, and 4.0L GR series V6 engines.

There will also be a 5.0L chain drive V8 soon.
Learn something new every day. The only Toyota V8 that I have experience with is the 4.7 in my Tundra which has a belt. But the new 5.7 in the Tundra has 2 chains. That is an interesting design change.
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Old April 16th, 2007, 18:26   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gquenstedt
Learn something new every day. The only Toyota V8 that I have experience with is the 4.7 in my Tundra which has a belt. But the new 5.7 in the Tundra has 2 chains. That is an interesting design change.
The 5.7L has 4 chains. One each for each bank, then a cam-to-cam chain on each bank. They did away with the [much simpler] gear drive for the cam-to-cam setup mainly due to the double VVT arrangement, which I am pretty sure the 5.7L uses as well.

Honestly, I would MUCH rather have the belt driven 4.7L. Tried and true, bulletproof and reliable. Only issue I have ever seen on the 4.7L is cracked exhaust manifolds (somewhat common on the Land Cruiser/LX 470) and a starter once in a while (requires intake removal, but actually a pretty easy job).

The 4.7L (and its 4.0L and 4.3L relatives) are also very easy to service...spark plugs, timing belts, etc. are all pretty easy to do.

I personally think the 4.3L VVT all-aluminum V8 is one of if not THE best V8 engine ever made. It really shames the domestic V8s. I bet a 300k mile LS430's engine will have less wear internally than a 50k mile GM pushrod dinasaur.
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Last edited by oilhammer; April 17th, 2007 at 11:18.
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Old April 22nd, 2007, 18:02   #60
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What's your guys opinion on the importance of changing the guide roller and tensioner or water pump when doing the timing belt. My mech's online shop manual doesn't recomend changing them with the TB. I have 80K on the tdi. He figures they'd be fine till the next change (160K). Is there anyone who've had the items go out and damage anything? Wouldn't you hear those bearings going bad or have a leak from the water pump before anything actually failed?
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