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TDI Conversions Discussions on converting non TDIs into TDIS. More general items can be answered better in other sections. This is ideal for issues that don't have an overlap and are very special to swaping engines.

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Old December 20th, 2019, 16:27   #61
Powder Hound
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Default Day 42(b)

Then since the surround has been sitting there expectantly, I decided I needed to pay some attention to it.

When you line it up, there is a large tab that is designed to insert just under the outer skin of the roof, and over the second layer of roof support. There is a third brace in the roof as well, but it is under that second layer.

When you just line them up directly, the tab, about 1-2 inches from the side, just keeps going straight instead of following the curve of the roof. Since I didn't have any help to get it in place, I sanded those ends thinner so that I'd be able to fit them in. and that worked out OK.



Here's the left side:



And here is the span, tucked in for the preliminary fit:



Now, here's the 'fun' part. The sides want to stick out wider than would align with the door edge. Pushing the side in (either side...) causes the middle at the bottom (along the front wall where it is sitting) to flex toward the back about 1/2 inch. This is going to be interesting. The flex is no problem, but my question will be what is the best way to hold down those sides. Interesting problem...

And now, since it is Friday, we'll have game night.

What is the difference between the following 2 photos?

Photo 1:



Photo 2:



Well, I did stand in a different location, so details like what is showing or not showing due to the perspective don't count.

Thinking...

Thinking...

Thinking...

Give up?

Have the answers?

OK, score yourself:

2 points for the very minor differences in the extension cord from the hot air gun on the right side of the bed.

2 points for the the differences in the power cord from the belt sander that is sitting on top of the orange extension cord spool.

5 points for the little led flashlight (yeah, the one that looks like a mini work light) on top of the orange tool box, partially occluded by the Dewalt drill with the grinding disk mounted. It is missing in photo 2.

And 10 points, the grand prize, for noticing that the bumper is now back where it should be. Yay!

Cheers,

PH
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Old December 21st, 2019, 07:25   #62
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Is this the vehicle that the BBS wheels are going on?
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Old December 21st, 2019, 15:23   #63
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Maybe.

I have a nice set of Enkeis as well. My plan is that the first one that runs, the trucklet or my 4-dr will get the Enkeis, and the other will get the BBS VZs. I'll have to locate some tires first, however, for the BBS wheels. I have other tires, but they're going on some 17 inch wheels I have.

If you check the last few pages of the what did you do to your Mk IV thread, you'll see that I've had some troubles of late with my 4-dr. A pump reseal didn't work out so well. I think, at this point, I fubarred my injection pump, but for the life of me, I can't figure out where I went wrong.

Anyway, so a trucklet in build stages and a 4-dr down until I get the pump figured out. Or replaced.

Good thing I have a few extra cars hanging around to use.

Cheers,

PH
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Old December 23rd, 2019, 14:33   #64
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Not working on the truck today as I have some other things to do. But, I'll explain my plan of attack for the surround.

Last time I was able to mount it on the car in a trial fit position. The front sides that need to line up with the rear edge of the front doors sticks out a lot. I was wondering if the part had a problem. So I found a video that Mark did where he was explaining what to do to mount the quarter panels and the surround.

In the example he was doing, it was an older part (one where they used to do little windows back there). I noticed that his surround was wide at the door edge like mine is, but he was able to push it in with one finger. Mine - nope, not a chance. Mine is pretty difficult to push in, and the stiffness through the side and around that rear corner is such that if you push the side in to match with the door, the middle of that rear part going across the back and sits on the top of the front wall displaces toward the back.

In other words, the part is distorting due the the substantive structure of the sides and corner.

My fear is that if I just pushed in the sides and secured them with multiple screws along the forward door edge, then that lower rear edge across the back would distort and cause too much stress on the window. That might crack the glass, or spring the frame, or even pop the glass and frame out of the surround at some point down the road.

The 'easy' quick thing to do is to use my heat gun to relax the corner while securing the sides where they need to end up. The only snag on that is the corner is tall, and the heat gun is essentially a point source. But while that is a concern, I don't think it will cause the method to fail.

Another factor to help make it easier would be to grind out the corner on the inside, use the heat gun to warp the plastic and do the install, and then at some later point use some epoxy and fiberglass to restore structure on the inside at a later date.

Using polyester resin would work as well, but all I can easily find is the really cheap stuff you find in home improvement stores or FLAPS, and that stuff you don't really want to use if you can help it. It is the cheapest resin there is. It has a very high percentage of styrene, which is necessary for the cross linking, but it is also the stink you smell with polyester resin. And the cheap stuff has a very high percentage of the styrene monomer, and what doesn't get cross linked will evaporate over a long period of time, stinking up the trucklet's interior the whole time.

So no, not going the route of using polyester resin for this.

Epoxy doesn't stink. Vinylester resin is as strong as epoxy, is cheaper most of the time, but has the styrene monomer stink potential like polyester, just maybe not as strong.

I'll have to do a little research on sites for vinylester and epoxy resins. Aircraft Spruce and Specialty is a great place for information and a lot of different choices for bonding systems to check out.

Probably I will see if the heat gun alone will get the job done, and then look at the grind out part of the laminate and restore back structure needed later method if needed.

But not tonight.

And last Saturday I didn't do any work because I spent yet another day working on the injection pump of my 4-dr Y2k Golf. Everything went well until it wouldn't start. My current theory is that I tooefed the pump head when I put it back together and damaged the bore such that it can't generate sufficient pressure anymore to overcome the pop pressure on the injectors.

I now have a replacement pump on the way, and I'll be able to look the old pump over when the replacement arrives and I pull the old pump.

And that's the way it is.

Cheers!

PH
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Old December 24th, 2019, 02:08   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Powder Hound View Post


And that's the way it is.


LMAO, I totally read that with a Walter Cronkite voice in my head.



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Old December 24th, 2019, 04:19   #66
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You know, I have 2 goals with this thread: 1) be somewhat entertaining, and 2) provide information.

I know I'm not a great writer, but hopefully y'all find my style just different enough that you enjoy reading.

And the other thing, providing information, well, I'm not a shill for the Smyth-Ute guys. I'm trying to be straight on this. They've done a few things wrong, but those things are difficult details and mostly my opinion anyway. On all the rest, they've done an amazing job to get it right in nearly every case. So as a kit, they've done a great job and I'd recommend it to anyone that is so inclined.

The other part of that is that it is a kit, so you get to do a lot of labor. It isn't quite as easy as some of the videos would have you believe. And when you run into a problem, you get to figure out how to fix it. It has taken me a while to figure out that for these deals, I'm pretty much on my own. I've called Mark a couple of times, and it is pretty much a few suggested solutions that have been tried, but in the end, you do it how you want. But no matter how that goes, when you call, you get the principal on the phone, not someone who has been there for only 6 weeks. It's a pretty good deal, and people respect as well as cherish that. Mark noted, when I went and picked up my kit, that he doesn't get inundated with spurious calls. Even he is surprised with that.

There's forums on facebook, but for multiple reasons, I will never have a facebook presence. There should be good information there; I don't know.

So what ends up with this thread is that I'm giving a detailed enough account that I hope anyone who is considering this project will be able to see everything that is involved, and at least my solution for it. Not that it could ever be the only solution, just my take on the problem. For example, I haven't seen any you tube video showing that there's corrosion in the trunk area that should be addressed.

Anyway, I'm very glad some people like what is being written here and I love that you say so.

Thanks!

PH
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Old December 25th, 2019, 15:01   #67
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Default Day 43

It is Christmas, after all, so just for a short change of pace I went up to the shop to do a quick warp on the surround.

First thing I did was line it up and used blue tape to mark a spot that I will need to go over later. I'll need to take a millimeter or so off the outer metal at that spot.



If the photo had turned out a little better you'd be able to see that the cut is generally pretty good, but at that spot it needs a minor adjustment.

Anyway, I found a couple of clamps, and set them to move the sides in so that they will match the contour of the door edge. Then I ran my hot air gun along the rear corner. I figure if I move that part, then the stress on the rest of the surround across the back will be alleviated.



I needed 2 clamps.



After heating the corner for about 15 minutes or so, I figured that would do it. Then I did the other side in the same manner.

In the end, there is still a little strain:



That gray stripe is the part that should be below the matching surface of the door. So there is more work that needs to be done. Nevertheless, it is easier to push that part in than before I started. So some progress was made.

Merry Christmas, everyone!

Cheers,

PH
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Old January 3rd, 2020, 17:12   #68
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Default Day 44

Happy New Year!

Well, now that the holidays are past, and there is a lull between ice storms, it is time to get back to the project.

Last time, I was a little disappointed in that the rear surround still wasn't quite in line after a bunch of time under the hot air gun. It had improved, but not enough, and pushing it in still took a lot of pressure and bent the line along the front wall (that is, the bottom edge of the surround that goes across the bed and rests on the bed's front wall).

Time to change that.

Part of the time off wasn't completely work and trying to use a snow blower to move ice; I did think about the problem. I had come to the conclusion that I would need to grind out the vertical corner at the rear of the surround so that it would be thin enough that the sides could be bent in without flexing the rest of the surround.

But, first you gotta think like an engineer.



Well, you can't really see it, so here's a better view of the passenger side from the rear:



I cut a single line from the inside corner through the horizontal surface to the outside. I did this on both sides, so 4 cuts.

And after the cuts and repositioning, you see this:



So the sides are very nearly in place without any pressure, and the pressure to get it right goes from about 25 pounds to 1 pound.

Here's the left (driver's) side, and you can see the cut easily.



And if you look at the front of the surround, you see that this side as well is very close to perfect alignment with the door edge, and without extra pressure. Yay!

Here's a couple of shots to show how the lower cut was made.



Hard to see, but a little more clear when seen from the inside:



And that's it. I'm about ready to glue and rivet in the surround. And the quarter panels as well. I just need to see if there're some videos showing how some other people fastened it on the edge that lines up with the door.

A short night, but seeing how it all lines up, a very satisfying one.

Cheers!

PH
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Old January 4th, 2020, 16:08   #69
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Default Day 45

I am starting to get all the rest of the little details done so I can do the final assembly.

Today's first task was to fit the fuel filler door.



I lined it up to see where the problems are. I see that I needed to prep for a wider hinge than was accounted for in the lines that Mark (or someone else at the factory) paints to show what you need to cut out.

Above I'm trying to mark off the actual width of the hinge cutout.

Here it is from the inside. I put sharpie marks at the tape.



Then you cut and try and cut and try and cut and try and cut and try. Continuing to mark and trim out the plastic so the part can fit in, but still leave a margin to use to fasten (glue) the part in place. It can take a little while. At the hinge, you need just a little margin, but it must be thinned so it can fit in between the hinge and the lid.

The new setup uses a finger indent, but the plastic backing needs to be trimmed out just a little or you won't actually be pulling up on the lid. In the end I got it to fit flush and it should work very well.



You fasten it down with glue around the edge and a couple of rivets to make sure.


But no, I didn't actually do it because I didn't bring the glue (windshield adhesive).

Then I decided it was time to go back to the right side tail light. The one that wouldn't fit no matter what. Well I played with it a bit and finally stumbled onto the trick to get the tail light assemblies to fit into the opening after all the adjustments they tell you about: If you don't have the bumper cover (Mark claims it is called a 'roll pan') in place yet, you need to push the lower part of the quarter panel in as if it is being held there by the roll pan. Then the tail light fits. If you don't push in on that lower part, the tail light won't line up and fit in the opening. It just won't. Which means that you really need to torque the quarter panel to get it to fit right.



and pushing:



It is a little hard to see, but if you look at the inside vertical edge, the one that will line up with the tailgate, you can see the displacement in the first one and that the second one is lined up after my leg is pushing in on the quarter panel.

Well, that's about it. I started looking at the lights. They supply these led things for the license plate illuminators, and I'm not sure I want to use them. But probably I will because they'll be easier to install than cutting a square hole for the OEM lights and making a little box to protect them from getting wet, dirty, and corroded in too short a time. And if using the OEM lights, you'd probably need to mount them on the sides of the plate indentation because I don't think there is quite enough room to mount them on the top.

I'll be needing to mount the backup lights in the tail light assemblies. That won't be too hard. And then it is on to match up the wires to their proper places so the lights will work properly. The color codes on the wires that are given in the written manual is nearly correct. My car didn't quite match and I'd bet it is due to being a different year than the one they wrote the manual from. No worries - the difference is very small and only 1 wire.

I'll have to get some long sheet metal screws for the surround. And maybe enough to use elsewhere on the body panels, and it'll be ready to go. I will probably be ready to start gluing everything for real in another week or so.

Cheers!

PH
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Old January 11th, 2020, 16:32   #70
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Default Day 46

Yes, I'm still alive!

It has been an interesting week at work; not so much for working on the trucklet. I have been doing some work at home on lights.

It is a little awkward in some respects. Specifically, the turn signal/backup lights. The Smyth setup is to have regular parking/stop lights going in the lower half of the light assembly. (In case you forgot, this is the rear lights.) The turn signal and backup light is the upper half, where you have a clear round cell. That cell is provided with a socket separately, where you just add the amber bulb, also provided, and then drill a 3/8" hole (they let you figure out the size) and mount a reverse light in there. The only thing I really have against this is that the backup light will probably be pointing in a direction other than straight back. Now this may or may not be a problem. For most people, I think a little light is about all they expect anyway, and you usually make do with that. I figure I can do a little better.

I started working on replacing the red lights as well, but I decided that part was taking too long, so I'm going to set the reds aside for later. I do have some amber LEDs for the turn signal, and was thinking about the best way to do the install that will keep me from having to drill lots of holes in the compartment for the backup/turn and also have a reasonable installation.

So I thought about it and came up with this:



This is some thin aluminum (actually a roofing product I bought at the local home improvement store). By cutting out the shape shown, and putting a hole in the middle sufficient to mount the provided backup light (which is an LED light by the way), I can then mount the amber LEDs I have in the sides of the aluminum "cup" so they shine into the reflecting part of the capsule and make a nice amber turn signal.

Then all I will need to do is mount the aluminum cup like this:



There will be some more work to making this thing. I'll have to make the 'petals' or sides of the cup wider so I can glue them together, and then just stick it in place as shown instead of the green socket that Smyth provides. The wiring is the same problem that you have anyway, so that doesn't change.

In case you're wondering, the amber LEDs will be Phillips Lumileds in the Rebel package. It is small, has a small pad for soldering to a heat sink (that will be a small piece of copper) and small pads for the wires. I'm using 4 of them because the 350 ma power setting should need about 2.9 Vf for each LED.* To keep the brightness steady and keep from burning out the LEDs, I'm using a current controlled source that has thermal induced voltage and power limits to protect the circuit.

The red parking and stop lighting will be done with Rebel LEDs as well, but that will be done at a later time because I really need to get this trucklet driveable as soon as possible since some other unanticipated priorities are beating on me hard right now.

For esthetics, I like the idea of having the turn signal and backup not look like there's a weirdness in the bottom of that part of the light assembly. That's my own taste - to you it might not matter one whit. That's just fine - we all have out own likes and dislikes.

The front side of the photo above looks like this, even though it isn't a very useful shot:



It shows that the outer part of the assembly has a lot of "lens" effect. You can barely see the aluminum cup, and really the dark hole I already put in it is about the only thing that sets it off. When I'm done, that dark hole will be replaced by a much larger round button with a bunch of LEDs in it. They're yellow, because that is the color of the phosphors. The way they do white LEDs is to make a UV LED and then coat it with a phosphor mix that glows white when irradiated with UV from underneath. And that phosphor mix looks yellow when it isn't being run by UV.

The other thing I did today was to spend about 2 hours doing final adjustments to the quarter panels and surround. That all came out nicely. When I was doing that part, I found I had forgotten the memory card for my camera, so I don't have photos of that. But, you didn't really miss much. There were a couple of spots on the upper and lower corners of the left side of the surround - both of them being where they impinge on the Jetta body. Also a spot on the right upper corner that was preventing the surround from getting to where it needs to go.

Now, the parts all fit very nicely. There will be about 4 or 5 places where screws will be needed to achieve the proper displacement from the body to line up with their matching surfaces. That is, the part is too high on its own and needs to be held down.

For example, on its own, the right side of the surround sticks out a little higher than the door edge it needs to match up with. You drill a small hole (1/8" or so) through the surround. You countersink that hole. Then you also drill a similar hole in the metal underneath. The screw, flat top made for a countersink hole, goes through, and is screwed through the metal until the surround is at the correct height to match up with the door when closed.

You do all this to set it up, then remove the screws, and apply the adhesive. The surround requires adhesive on both sides of the tab that goes into the roof, all along the base that rests on the front bed wall, and on the sides where it connects to the body. Or where it gets close to the body. Then you can set the screws. Then you can install the rivets in the roof. You'll really only need a few rivets in the roof (4? 3?) to hold the tab while the adhesive sets up. Then you can apply filler to the sides along the doors. A little more filler to cover the screws, along the top to cover the seam and the rivets. I'll be using a heavier filler (in my case I'll be using Tiger Hair) for the sides by the doors, because that is a bigger gap problem. The small and thin filler parts along the roof, for example, will be filled in my case by Metal Glaze. I like it better than Bondo.

I'll have to post some photos when I start this process next week so it will be more clear than my above explanation, so stay tuned!

I'm excited that the end is looking like it is actually coming. The light at the end of the tunnel is now visible, and as long as it doesn't start whistling at me,** I'll be OK.

Cheers,

PH

* For LEDs, a constant brightness is what you want, particularly when you are using a bunch of them in a series. Because of variations in manufacturing, a series of LEDs with a constant voltage can appear to be of differing brightness. With proper manufacturing controls, and binning of the end product, that probably won't happen. Or rather, the differences wouldn't be too annoying, especially in an indirect light situation like I am planning for the turn signals. But, as a/r as I am, I'm going to use a constant amperage power regulator so all the LEDs will be of the same brightness, and any excess voltage will be absorbed by the regulator. This keeps the LEDs from glowing differently depending on engine speed, or whether the battery has finished recharging after starting, for example.

The Vf is the forward voltage of the diodes. For my installation, for the brightness I am running, that value will be right around 2.9 volts. 4 of them in series will consume close to the 12 volts available in the car, except that while running the voltage delivered will probably be between 13.5 and 14.2 volts. If I use a voltage regulator configured for constant amperage, it will keep the LEDs from running too bright, and therefore too hot, because that would severely limit their lifetime. And one of the reasons I want to run LEDs is so I will never have to change the darn things.

The one problem I don't have an answer for is the backup light. It might be a chinesium POS (highly likely) where they overdrive it and don't heatsink properly, which means you have a great little light for 10 hours instead of the 20k hours they advertise on the package. We'll see...

** - yeah, a train would ruin my whole day.
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Old January 18th, 2020, 15:05   #71
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Default Day 47

Well, no photos today. Rats. I took photos, and I can see them on the camera, but my computer where I connect to TDI Club has decided it no longer wants to read the SD card. Stupid machine. All I can do at this point is add in the photos at a later time if my computer decides to repent.

Today I decided to install the tie downs so I could go ahead and finish enough to glue/install the quarter panels and rear surround.

I started out by working on an experiment to see if my idea of doubling the wall behind the bracket will work. I thought riv nuts would be a good way of installing a solid faster back there.

So I ordered some rivnuts and a huge drill bit from McMaster-Carr. I received them the next day. Impressive. And the shipping is quite reasonable for something like this. Rock Auto, you should take notes.

I had been thinking to determine the locations and then weld a backing plate at that point. The weld wouldn't show, and it would make a solid reinforced base for a tie down.

I grabbed a couple of pieces of scrap aluminum (nice to have a metal shop right there) and drilled the holes. Then, since I have 2 sizes of riv nuts, I started with the shorter size. I had a slight hard time getting the nut through the hole, and had to re-drill and ream it out. Then I screwed a long 8mm bolt through the nut and used it as a way to hammer the nut into the hole without collapsing the rivet part of the nut. Then I turned the bolt to collapse the nut. The nut spun. So I used a vice-grip to hold the back side (this version didn't have the hex facets like some riv-nuts do) while I turned the bolt.

What ended up happening is the the rivet collapsed at the outside surface first. It turned and the little grooves dug out the outer surface of the aluminum and that front surface deformed. The bolt head dug into the surface flange as well.

I tried the same thing with the longer rivnut and the same thing happened. Hmmmm.... I was thinking about going back to the hardware store, buying bolts and nuts that will fit completely inside the threads (6mm or so ought to do it) and then using washers to isolate the rivnut so that turning the bolt and nut with wrenches at both sides will supply crush pressure like the real tool does.

But the day was wasting away, too. So I punted.

The key here is to stop and think for a few minutes. All this reinforcement I was thinking of doing is a great idea under other circumstances, but here I think it just isn't worth the effort. Simply because, after all, the side wall that is supporting the tie down is only 1/8" aluminum. Reinforcing the tie down will set it up so that a failure will appear over a wider area and be more difficult to fix. Besides, this whole trucklet is really a light duty unit - aptly termed a 1/4 ton at best. So trying to have a heavy duty tie down is just silly.

So the punt was to take the tie downs (door jamb striker 'U' plates and the bolts used to mount them - got them from a local company that recycles a lot of VWs and Audis) and use extra washers and 8mm nuts that are supplied with the kit.

Over all, drilling and installing these things took about 90 minutes. There was another hour or so used earlier in the week to think about where best to put them and then measure out and mark things so it wouldn't look like a 5th grader did it with no tools when it was all done.

With that out of the way, it was time to do the final steps before glue-down and rivet for the 2 body panels. Defined: I'm done with the shaping and fitting, so the thing left is to install some screws to keep the panels in place while the gluing and riveting is done. That is, putting the panels in place helps you size it all up and get the door gaps correct front to back, but the panels stick out from the car too much in a couple of places. `When you put the surround in place, it stays pretty much where you put it. The quarter panels do as well, but I wanted them to stay there instead of trying to jump off the bed side walls, so I used a single uninstalled rivet to hold them in place. You just put the quarter panel in place, and drill a rivet sized hole just like you were going to install it, and then stick the rivet in place. You don't pop it, and so you can pull it out whenever you need to remove the quarter panel. Such as when I needed to install tie downs. Or shape the quarter panels for final fit. But while this method works great for the fore-aft location, and is good for quick removal and reinstall, it isn't the final fit that you need. You can line it up this way and have the door edge gap correct, but viewed from above, the surround and quarter panels stick out from the body too far and need to be held down when you do the final assembly.

The way you hold them down is to get some kind of long screw. Then you drill the body panel in strategic locations. For the surround, the top and bottom close to the door edge works well. You drill a hole large enough to accommodate the screw shaft. Then you counter sink the hole in the fiberglass, so when it is installed you have a little space to fill in and hide the screw. Then you drill a smaller hole in the metal of the B pillar. Stick the right length screw in, and screw it in until the panel is pulled down to the correct height to match up with the door edge.

If that all makes sense, great. I wish I could post a few photos, it would be much more clear.

I didn't do the quarter panels. At least, I didn't install the screws. I need a longer drill bit, but I don't know where I'd find one, and I don't want to wait for mail order. So I will find a way to mark the metal and then remove the quarter panel and drill the hole in the lower B pillar. Then I'll be able to put the quarter panel back on and install the adjustment screw. I will also need to locate some longer screws. Well a middle size I don't have would be a better way to put it.

I have 1", 1-5/8", 2", and 3" screws. They're exterior screws, so they have a corrosion resistant coating. They should be fine, just need to apply a little corrosion protection to where they penetrate the B pillar. The 1-5/8" screws worked OK for the surround, but the fender is quite a bit farther away from the B pillar. The drill bit I need for the smaller hole won't make it to the B pillar metal. The 2" screw isn't quite long enough, and the 3" screw is overkill. I don't want the screw to stick too far into the interior and have to cut it from inside or risk poking something later, so I want screws that are the right size. I'll look for some 2-1/2" screws before finishing this part up.

And it was snowing, so I decided that I'd just call it a day and go home.

Tail lights:

I've been working on these, but I found my original idea isn't going to work, so I will re-configure my turn-signal-backup light cell. The brake/parking lamp will be the suggested 2 filament bulb that has a socket supplied. I figure when I get more time at some point in the future (when?!?!?!?) and want to replace the bulb with red LEDs, it won't be hard to do. Just not right now. Gotta finish the blinkin' trucklet because there is a lot of work piling up for it to do. Anyway, I'll do some pictures of the new setup, and when my computer decides to cooperate, I'll show you.

Cheers!

PH
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Last edited by Powder Hound; January 18th, 2020 at 17:36. Reason: Correct Typos. (Yes, some of us do proofread!)
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Old January 19th, 2020, 15:35   #72
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Default Day 47, with photos this time!

I was able to find a peripheral to read that flash card for photos. Some of these will be a little boring. But I am including them because you might want to see the damage you can see if you click to see the full size image.

The backside of the first experimental rivnut (the short one).

The front side. Here you can see the damage.

Then you need to drill a 13mm hole, you need a BFD. Big <cough!> drill.

Starting the second test with the long rivnut. I have the bolt in place to use as a mandrel to seat the rivnut in the hole.

Tapping in...

Ready to torque.

Backside...

This shop where I'm working has been around a while and the owner likes to collect tools he uses. Not every day of course, but this is an interesting BFH.

Just kidding - it is actually a rubber mallet.

OK, so the rivnut thing didn't work. There are a lot of possibilities, such as ensuring that when you set the nut you don't spin it. Also, doing the correct size hole is important, but the recommended drill size was 13.5mm, which I could not find easily. I figured 13mm would do, particularly since I was hand drilling it and wouldn't guarantee the finished hole would be perfectly sized to the bit. And there is the other consideration that a rivnut is essentially somewhat soft so that it will deform.

With these considerations, maybe aluminum isn't the best substrate to use to set one of these things. And the not spinning the rivnut when you're trying to set it in place is another biggie. Maybe the most important. I just don't have time to do more experiments.

So, as I noted above, time to punt.
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You always pay for what you get. Sometimes you get what you pay for.
It is called dope because it does make you dumb.
Thinking outside the box is difficult for some. They're afraid they'll fall off the edge of the box and be lost to oblivion.

Last edited by Powder Hound; January 19th, 2020 at 15:39.
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Old January 19th, 2020, 15:47   #73
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Default Day 47, photos continued.

I decided a front and back pair on each side would be best.

It makes sense, particularly if you're going to tie say, a net or a tarp over cargo. Or maybe make a tray for bicycle(s). And I'm not worried about mounting a box at the front of the bed. Not that kind of truck.

And here it is mounted.

The back side, showing washers and nuts:

Front location:


Drilling for the locator screws:

Finished with surround:

You see 3 holes, and the surround pair have screws but the top one on the quarter panel is countersinked but does not have a screw in it since I did not have an appropriate length screw, and have not yet drilled the pilot hole in the B pillar.

Same story on the driver's side.




So that's it for yesterday's illustrations.

Stay tuned for tomorrow!

Cheers,

PH
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Old January 20th, 2020, 17:44   #74
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Default Day 48

Time to attach the quarter panels and surround.

Not lots to show in terms of process. Since the panels have been on and off dozens of times for fitting and various adjustments, today is a rivet and glue it so we can get on with it day.

The basic process is apply the adhesive, and use rivets to hold the panel until the adhesive sets up. That might take some extra time, because it is <bleep>ing cold up here, and that part of the shop isn't heated. Not really.

The adhesive I'm using is Dow U-486 windshield adhesive. It is a urethane type glue that is good at bridging a gap. Once it sets up, it is pretty difficult to get it off. I found that when fresh, it cleans up with methanol, which is convenient because I already had some. It is quite viscous when warm, and when cold, well, I broke a caulking gun trying to extrude it from the metal tube.

I overcame this by borrowing a heavy duty gun my shop owner friend has and by using my heat gun to warm it up when trying to apply it.

For the quarter panels, I needed a couple of rivets on the top surface that is on top of the bed side walls, up by the front of the bed. And one at the tail end to keep that part on the tail end. After getting those done, I found that the locator screws I had already drilled didn't work. So on the driver's side, I didn't really need the screw, and on the passenger side I used a clamp. I figure it will be good until the adhesive cures.

On the bottom of the quarter panels, you apply adhesive and then rivets along the bottom where it contacts the car, and up around the wheel well until about 10 o'clock (passenger side, 2 o'clock on the driver's side) because that is where the sheet metal ends.

Then it is remove the panel, clean the surfaces that will accept the adhesive, and vacuum any other dust and debris out of the car that has collected. For me, there were aluminum shavings and plastic/fiberglass dust from adjusting. Then apply the adhesive, position the panel, do the rivets on top, then start with the rivets along the bottom. Before I did the final positioning, I also made a small dent in the running board so that water collecting there would be able to drain straight down. There is a small port there, and I'm not sure if water is supposed to be able to come out there or go in there and drain elsewhere. I'm assuming the former, so making a little dent to allow water to drain should be a good idea.

Here's the passenger side panel all glued and riveted.



Another view.



The driver's side looks basically like a mirror image, just the dust and fingerprints are different.

Here's the surround.



It is taped. The window has the same tape that has been there since the window was installed. The top seam has been glued and 7 rivets drilled. I found some of the glue was scraped off and is bulging up on that roof seam. I was going to clean it off, which would have taken quite some time with paper towels and methanol, but my friend who came in to examine the progress commented, "that's why they make razor blades!" I decided he has a point. The lower seam tape is to be able to just peel the tape after loading the seam, and have an instant wonderful clean seam. I find that the adhesive is so viscous that it is difficult to get it clean there at the tape, so I'm going to have to carefully trim adhesive when I pull the tape. Trying to pull the tape early would just make a mess because again, the adhesive is super viscous and the tape would lift the edge of the adhesive and make a mess. I'll just have to work with it after it sets up.

Here's another view before filling the lower seam. I already had adhesive in between the surround and the front wall, I just needed to fill the seam. You can also see the clamp on the quarter panel and the excess adhesive pushing up at the roof seam.



The driver's side of the surround, ready to go with filling the seam.



Here's the seam filled. I decided to go ahead and do this now, because I had about 1/4 tube left, and no way to seal a partial tube without it becoming difficult (curing at the nozzle, even if you seal with aluminum foil) as well as generally messy.



And the other side:



And that's about it. I still have 5 rivets left, and the rear bumper (aka "roll pan" according to the Smyth instructions) takes at least 6, unless you are a fashion heathen and go with 2 on one side and 3 on the other. But if you checked carefully above, you will notice that I said nothing about the 2 running board pieces that go under the front doors to match up with the bottom of the quarter panels. You need rivets for those as well. Good thing I already bought a small box of them (flush rivets) and am ready to go. I didn't try and install those because I found a couple of places that need some rust treatment. So, they will take a little more time. And the top covers for the bed sides will take some flush rivets as well as more adhesive. This could get interesting, and I'll probably review some videos before finishing those parts.

So I still have the tail lights to finish and wire, the license plate lights, and the roll pan. Then I'll need to do a couple of mechanical things (exhaust, left rear brake, parking brake cables, wheels & tires) and at least put primer on everything before I start driving it. It is still too dang cold to paint. At this point, I'm not sure I can do the primer. I'll have to run a test.

So, I'm pretty close.

Cheers,

PH
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Last edited by Powder Hound; January 20th, 2020 at 17:50.
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Old January 22nd, 2020, 16:39   #75
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Default Day 49

I just went by the shop. I was going to work on the rear rollpan and wiring, but it was just too cold.

I started out to trim the adhesive that gished out the top of the roof seam, and while the part that was actually sticking up was firm, the part close and down in the slight groove is still gooey. 48 hours just isn't enough time to cure in this cold. I need to trim it very close like that so there will be room for the metal glaze filler to stick. I might have to go over it with my heat gun. We'll see how it is on Saturday.

And my fingers were getting stiff from the cold as well, so I called it. Single digits, or close to it, don't work well for this type project.

Cheers,

PH
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