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Go Back   TDIClub Forums > TDI Model Specific Discussions Areas > VW MKVI-A6 Golf family including Jetta SportWagen (~ 2010-2014)

VW MKVI-A6 Golf family including Jetta SportWagen (~ 2010-2014) Discussions area for A6/MkVI (2010-2014) Golf and Golf Wagons (Jetta Sportwagon in the USA).

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Old February 22nd, 2018, 10:36   #16
cliballe
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TDI(s): 2010 Jetta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henrick View Post
cliballe, have you checked the radiator return hose?
Today I checked mine after not too long drive and it was warm. Not hot but not stone cold either.
To me it seems that my t-stat might not be fully closing.
I never see coolant temperatures over 82 *C under normal conditions.
When in a regen it gets to 88-91 *C.
The t-stat in this car is rated for 92 *C
77k miles on the clock but the car is seeing exclusively short trips only and city driving
I haven't done that yet myself. I will check after my evening commute and post back the results. I'm expecting to have the same results as you. Most of my during the week driving is 15 minutes to and from work, but on the weekends I log a several hours of sustained highway driving.

Edit: My coolant hoses were all just warm after driving around for over 30 minutes... not hot. Dash gauge was straight up at "190F."

Last edited by cliballe; February 22nd, 2018 at 19:08.
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Old February 22nd, 2018, 11:20   #17
Henrick
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Originally Posted by cliballe View Post
I haven't done that yet myself. I will check after my evening commute and post back the results. I'm expecting to have the same results as you. Most of my during the week driving is 15 minutes to and from work, but on the weekends I log a several hours of sustained highway driving.
Well, sustained highway driving is not very hard on engine; if the car is unloaded the load isn't high.

What we want to eliminate before getting into that difficult replacement stuff is that your car may not be reaching full operating temperature for t-stat to open (wind from the fron of the car, cabin heater blasting on full power, low engine load). Of course the chances are minimal but still, let's check. These TDI engines are very fuel efficient so they produce not much waste heat.
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Old February 22nd, 2018, 11:40   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henrick View Post
Well, sustained highway driving is not very hard on engine; if the car is unloaded the load isn't high.
What we want to eliminate before getting into that difficult replacement stuff is that your car may not be reaching full operating temperature for t-stat to open (wind from the fron of the car, cabin heater blasting on full power, low engine load). Of course the chances are minimal but still, let's check. These TDI engines are very fuel efficient so they produce not much waste heat.
The load on the engine is HIGHEST on the highway. You can watch this data in with a scan tool, most every car has this information. It takes more energy to move a car through the air at a higher speed, and the energy required goes up the faster you go. It does not take twice the power to move a car at 80 as it does 40, it takes something like 2.5 times.

The difference is, the load is more sustained, without the strong spikes, so it levels off. You can idle the engine to about 30 or so. After than, you need more fuel and air to push the car through the air.

This is why idling the engine does little to warm them up, and even short trips around town don't do a whole lot. But you jump on the highway and (when everything is in good order) they'll get up to temp quicker.
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Old February 22nd, 2018, 12:40   #19
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In the parts list there's a lot of gaskets for EGR plumbing, EGR valve as well as ASV valve.
Stange enough they also included a Turbo-to-DPF gasket too.
Copied off from the dealer invoice....

It was leaking all over the front of the block, perhaps they had to take a whole bunch of stuff off to check.
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Old February 23rd, 2018, 01:01   #20
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OH, thanks for info. I really thought it was the opposite. I remember seeing dealership posters advertising VW LongLife service schedule. It was listed that cars driven lightly, most on the highways are eligible for long-life programme. That's why I assumed the load was minimal there.
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Old February 23rd, 2018, 01:15   #21
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Cars that do a lot of highway driving go through fewer heating/cooling cycles, spend more time at operating temp., and are generally happier than their short trip counterparts. The extra load is actually good for the engine.
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Old February 23rd, 2018, 04:19   #22
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Originally Posted by turbobrick240 View Post
Cars that do a lot of highway driving go through fewer heating/cooling cycles, spend more time at operating temp., and are generally happier than their short trip counterparts. The extra load is actually good for the engine.

Exactly. And it is more of a steady load, which is also easier. Most "wear" happens during warmup, so a 20 mile trip is just as bad as a 200 mile trip. I live in the country, I never short trip my cars, unless I run into town for something locally. And then I try and use one of the gasoline fueled cars since they warm up much quicker anyway. The older diesels are less finicky about short trips though, even though they take longer to warm up.
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Old February 24th, 2018, 02:05   #23
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My daily trip is 5 miles one way usually. And this is if I don't stop at a gasoline station, grocery store or somewhere else. Sometimes I take it for a longer spin (as well when I notice regen in progress).
I don't want a gas car - there's no torque, not that fun to drive
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Old February 24th, 2018, 02:05   #24
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My daily trip is 5 miles one way usually. And this is if I don't stop at a gasoline station, grocery store or somewhere else. Sometimes I take it for a longer spin (as well when I notice regen in progress).
I don't want a gas car - there's no torque, not that fun to drive
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Old February 24th, 2018, 20:27   #25
cliballe
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Okay, here's my parts list. Let me know if you think I'm missing anything:

-2 M10-1.5x180mm bolts to move Hood Lock Carrier to service position

-1 Gallon of G13 Coolant, G0-13A-8J1-G, (in case I am not able to catch/reuse what's in there)

-1 Thermostat, 03L-121-111-AC, (includes new o-ring, 06B-121-119-B)

-1 Plastic Coolant Pipe, 03L-121-065-T, (includes new o-ring, 06B-121-687)

-1 Oil Filter Housing to Engine Block Gasket, 045-115-441

-4 Oil Filter Housing to Engine Block TTY bolts, N-911-494-01, (15N-m or 11lb-ft plus 90 degrees)

-1 EGR Valve Gasket, 03G-131-547-C

-1 "Throttle Body"/ASV Gasket, 03L-131-547-B

Last edited by cliballe; March 11th, 2018 at 09:13.
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Old February 25th, 2018, 00:00   #26
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Quote:
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In a couple of threads I mentioned my believes that t-stats do degrade with age and heat cycles and it's a good idea to replace them at timing belt time while you are there.

Some people flamed me away but I'm still sticking with my theory.

Is the t-stat on your car the one "with the large flange" like the one described here? http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=371430

If so, then yeah, it's a Royal PITA to do it but it's doable...
They very obviously degrade and should be replaced about every ~40,000 miles or fuel economy suffers. I agree with your hypothesis--I think the wax pellets are degraded by copper ion poisoning from heat cycling.

Last edited by nicklockard; February 25th, 2018 at 00:03.
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Old March 11th, 2018, 10:24   #27
cliballe
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Well I began to attempt the thermostat replacement this weekend, but I did not allow myself enough time so I had to abort to try again another day (I ended up spraying our 5 acre yard which took most of Saturday as the weather was unexpectedly perfect).

On Friday night I had pre-emptively moved the hood lock carrier out to service position which wasn't too difficult. I had the air box removed, but I was still unsure if there was enough room to be able to find the rear fastener to loosen the coolant pipe so I left it for the night. After I got done with all my spraying late yesterday afternoon I was able to reach way under the boost tube to locate the 12mm Triple Square bolt. At this point I realized it was too late to try and finish the job so I put everything back together and maybe I can try again next weekend.

Question:
Am I going to be able to remove and replace the coolant pipe once I remove the two fasteners/hose clamp? I could feel the heater hose clamp near the firewall, but man it is very tight back there so I am a little concerned over all the coolant hoses, EGR tube, boost tube, etc. in the way. If I wasn't replacing the pipe I would just loosen it, get the thermostat out, and be done, but since I have to remove it the task is a little more daunting to me.

Thanks ahead of time for your input!

Last edited by cliballe; March 11th, 2018 at 13:23.
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Old March 12th, 2018, 04:28   #28
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You'll need to remove that charge air pipe to gain access to the coolant pipe. I remove the clamp on the heater hose at the pipe you are replacing, not at the firewall. The heater hoses are made together, you'd have to take a bunch more stuff apart to get those out.

The picture I posted shows all the stuff (including that boost pipe) removed. It is the one that goes across the top of the bellhousing area and down past the starter.
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Last edited by oilhammer; March 12th, 2018 at 04:30.
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Old March 12th, 2018, 21:26   #29
cliballe
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Thanks, oilhammer, I'm going to give it another go this coming weekend with removing the charge air pipe. I'll have plenty of time to dig into it then.

BTW: About how long does this job take you to complete?

Last edited by cliballe; March 12th, 2018 at 21:32.
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Old March 13th, 2018, 04:57   #30
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BTW: About how long does this job take you to complete?
Ha! That depends as I usually have several things going at once. I suppose start to finish, including complete removal of the front end, maybe 2.5 to 3 hours' worth of actual time. I never really pay much attention to clocks, I pay more attention to detail in getting the job done correctly and completely.
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