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VW B5 Passat TDIs This is a general discussion about B5 Passat(>98 (2004-2005 in North America)). Non TDI related postings will be moved or removed.

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Old January 30th, 2019, 14:17   #31
imo000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildbill963258 View Post
...... the tdi is probably the best motor option that vw has available
The 2.0 gas engine is the most reliable engine in my opinion that VW had to offer when the B5.5 was made. Those engines are simple and pretty much bulletproof.
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Old January 30th, 2019, 20:22   #32
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Strange how? Ford, Honda, GM, Toyota, and others commonly have 10k mile intervals too.
Most gas cars are 3k miles or 3 months whichever comes first. My truck is a little different because it's a 7.3 so the oil gets heat shear. The interval on my truck is 5k miles or 6 months whichever comes first and that's using heavy duty diesel oil.
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Old January 30th, 2019, 20:23   #33
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Plus this is the newest car that I've ever owned in my life so things probably have changed.
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Old January 31st, 2019, 05:58   #34
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Originally Posted by Wildbill963258 View Post
Most gas cars are 3k miles or 3 months whichever comes first. My truck is a little different because it's a 7.3 so the oil gets heat shear. The interval on my truck is 5k miles or 6 months whichever comes first and that's using heavy duty diesel oil.

This is not true.

Show me the owner's manual that says this.

I will pick several popular models at random:

2010 Toyota Camry w/ the standard 2AR-FE 2.5L: 10k miles

2010 Honda Accord w/ the standard K24 2.4L: 10k miles

2010 Ford F150 w/ the 4.6L Triton V8: 7500 miles

2010 Chevrolet Malibu w/ the 2.4L Ecotec: 7500 miles

2010 Volkswagen Jetta w/ the standard 2.5L CBTA : 10k miles

2010 Nissan Altima w/ standard QR25DE 2.5L: 7500 miles

.... I can go on... I have the publications right in front of me. All the way back to 1984. You want something older? How about:

1990 Toyota pickup w/ 22RE 2.4L: 7500 miles

1990 Honda Civic w/ the D15B2 1.5L: 7500 miles

1990 Ford Taurus w/ the 3.0L "Vulcan" V6: 7500 miles

1990 Mazda 626 w/ the non-turbo 2.2L: 7500 miles

oooh... let's pick a weird one...:

1990 Daihatsu Charade w/ the standard 1.0L 3 banger: 5k miles
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Old January 31st, 2019, 06:21   #35
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Originally Posted by Wildbill963258 View Post
Plus this is the newest car that I've ever owned in my life so things probably have changed.
I guess it's the newest car by a lot. My '92 Camry had a 7,500 mile oil change interval. Hell, I don't recall what the interval was on my '78 Rabbit diesel, but I know it was more than 3,000 miles.

And I just looked it up: Manufacturer's recommended change interval for the 7.3L Powerstroke is 6 months/5,000 miles, except in severe duty conditions, where it's 3 months/3,000 miles. Everyone thinks their vehicle gets severe duty, but few do.
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Old January 31st, 2019, 08:40   #36
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The 3 months or 3k mile intervals are pushed by quick lube oil change centers, some auto parts stores, and then there are dealerships who also recommend their own "dealer recommended service intervals" instead of going by the manufacturer's recommended service schedules.
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Old January 31st, 2019, 10:36   #37
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The 3 months or 3k mile intervals are pushed by quick lube oil change centers, some auto parts stores, and then there are dealerships who also recommend their own "dealer recommended service intervals" instead of going by the manufacturer's recommended service schedules.
Yup, this is exactly what is happening. They scam customers into wasting their money for something that is not needed. They advertise this BS so many times that people start believing the adds as opposed to what the engine manufacturer says. Seen it many times. The owner's refuse to believe what the owner's manual states and think they are smarter than the people that designed the engine. Every time this comes up during a discussion I asked them "Do you replace your tires when they are 40% worn?". This is when some of them would "see the light" and understand how wrong they were. The rest will not change their mind regardless what I say.
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Old January 31st, 2019, 10:47   #38
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It isn't just the quickie lubers though. I think it is the general public and the prevailing stupidity and wastefulness. Plus, the fact that checking/topping off the oil BETWEEN services seems to be such a difficult thing, I have no idea why.

There are a LOT of people who somehow think it is more convenient to make an appointment, take time out of their day, bring a car in, and pay to have the oil changed than it is to just check the oil and top up if necessary. Something ANY able bodied human can do, no special skills or tools required, can be done anywhere there is light and a level surface.

What I really get a kick out of, is that there are a lot of people who will never, ever check the oil, gladly pay to have it changed thrice as often as necessary, yet cheap out on everything else. Never rotate the tires, and buy the cheapest rubber Chinese garbage they can fine, neglect filters, fluids, etc.... but boy they'll change the dickens out of that oil.
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Old January 31st, 2019, 15:04   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndigoBlueWagon View Post
I guess it's the newest car by a lot. My '92 Camry had a 7,500 mile oil change interval. Hell, I don't recall what the interval was on my '78 Rabbit diesel, but I know it was more than 3,000 miles.

And I just looked it up: Manufacturer's recommended change interval for the 7.3L Powerstroke is 6 months/5,000 miles, except in severe duty conditions, where it's 3 months/3,000 miles. Everyone thinks their vehicle gets severe duty, but few do.

My late '99 Superduty Powerstroke 7.3 got changes every 10k miles and it had over 360k on it when it was totaled (rear ended while parked) last fall. The only parts that truck ever needed beyond normal wear items was a crank position sensor o-ring to fix an oil leak and the oil pressure sensor for the injectors. I did replace the valve cover gaskets (they have the injector and glow plug harnesses integrated) when I replaced all 8 glow plugs and I added cruise control by swapping in a cruise wheel and clock spring.

When I was growing up my dad changed the oil in everything at 2k miles with Castrol GTX. Everyone told him he threw away better oil than they put in their cars
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Old February 1st, 2019, 06:09   #40
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Shoot, our old tow company had a fleet of trucks, mostly F-trucks with 7.3L, and they ran 15k mile service intervals, and they were all on the road after 300k+ miles, and had to be put BACK into service after they retired them, because before they could get their name off the side of them and get them to auction, all of their 6.0L replacement trucks blew up. All of them, 100%.

So if to truck use doesn't fall under "severe service" I don't know what does, and all those 7.3L trucks survived just fine. Some of them actually were running (meaning, the engine was never shut off save for a couple times during refueling where the oil was checked) for DAYS on end. The winter weather meant pile ups and crashes constantly, so they were hot seated, meaning when one driver's shift ended, he got out of the truck and the next driver got right in. 24-7.

Those old Fords were indestructible. After the 6.0L debacle, they switched to the Sterling Bullet trucks (cab chassis Ram with a different grill) with Cummins engines, and a few Isuzu NPRs. Not sure if the 6.7L in-house Ford diesel has been able to win back any of those buyers or not. We really do not see any of them in here for service, so I have no idea how well they hold up.
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Old February 11th, 2019, 00:57   #41
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Did you get the overboost issue fixed?
Check my posts about it.
I have been fighting an overboost for quite a while now.
Meanwhile driving 100km to a new workplace and back every day, having a new baby, moving to another country with a 2ton trailer and buying and fixing up a new house.

things became better, worse. Changed during, other things broke..
They are old cars.
But in the end its not a very big deal.
And the only thing that can happen, is that you have a slow car.

First! check that maf. Swaptest it with one that works from a junk car or friend or random person at the gasstation.

If thats ok. then go to the vacuum system.

Google a vacuum diagram for your engine. Print it and keep it at the car!
Then go buy 5 meter of 3mm, and 5 meter of 5mm tube. Silicone or rubber benzine hose. Something strong and durable. Dont know those sizes feet or thumbs.
Cut to size and replace every vacuum line one by one. Its a very easy job, and very rewarding.

Now blow on those lines one by one to see if there is an obvious culprit.
If it lets your air through, its leaking. also check the couplings! Check the hose from the vacuum pump to brake booster.

For instance where the brakebooster goes through the rubber at firewall, my rubber leaked. Later my heater valve leaked. new ones were cheap and relatively easy to find.

for the big hoses on the ic and pipes. Get some decent hoseclamps. Mine never came off.
They are cheap, very easy to reach and swap..

Now the last thing is probably the vanes being stuck by coal residue.
Push the rod going into the turbo. If it doesnt go smooth and easy. They are stuck and will throw a limp mode.
I am going to see if the mr muscle trick will solve it.
I spent a day reading and looking through results of people trying it. And for a lot of people it solved their sticky turbo vanes problem without any issues.
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