www.tdiclub.com

Economy - Longevity - Performance
The #1 Source of TDI Information on the Web!
Forums Articles Links Meets
Orders TDI Club Cards TDIFest 2016 Gone, but not forgotten VAG-Com List Unit Conversions TDIClub Chat Thank You

Order your TDIClub merchandise and help support TDIClub


Go Back   TDIClub Forums > VW TDI Discussion Areas > TDI Conversions

TDI Conversions Discussions on converting non TDIs into TDIS. More general items can be answered better in other sections. This is ideal for issues that don't have an overlap and are very special to swaping engines.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old May 3rd, 2020, 19:28   #1
RamblingswithRyan
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Ohio
Fuel Economy: Not sure yet
Default 1995 Ranger/B4000 TDI Swap

Things started out for me before I owned my Ranger. I followed BleepinJeep on youtube and Nate on that channel has a PD TDI in his Jeep Wrangler TJ. He has a series of videos that go into details on TDI swaps both specifically about Jeeps and also in general. Nate left and made his own channel, doing the same great content. Jon from BleepinJeep also started a build series of his 2001 Jeep Cherokee, and it has been the biggest inspiration for me to do my own swap.

I then bought my third Ford Ranger. (I know it looks like a B4000, but it is technically a Ranger. It had a body swap when the original rusted out. I'll be calling it a Ranger from now on.)

[IMG]1F55D1E6-26BF-4169-A466-BCA3B8C11F15 by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr[/IMG]

Having read Greengeeker's and Honeybadger's TDI Ranger builds about a year and a half ago, I decided to build my own Ranger, and the opportunity came not long after I bought my 1995 Ranger. I bought the truck in early 2019 and when summer came I found that there were a few things that the previous owner had let go and this resulted in it pinging for a long period of time. I won't go into details since none of you TDI folks really care about a Ford gasser.

I got to thinking about it and although there are a decent amount of Jeep TDI swap videos, there aren't really any of a Ranger TDI swap except for a couple short videos by Greengeeker on youtube. So I decided to add my swap to my youtube channel to help others in the TDI and Ford communities with some good quality info and video. If nothing else, just for entertainment.

I was planning to start my thread on here when I was done with the swap, but at the suggestion of Honeybadger, I decided to start my thread now.

Well anyway, I found a heck of a deal on a fully dressed 1999 Beetle ALH TDI that included the wiring harness, ECU, throttle pedal, and the engine stand it was on. The country feller I bought it from daily drove the Beetle and took everything out in order to put it in a Samurai he had. I guess things fell through when he had to sell the Samurai for some reason I don't recall, and he had to get rid of the TDI he had already pulled.

I started pulling the 4.0 V6 out of the Ranger in early April of this year with the help of a good friend. We removed the engine, trans, transfer case, and driveshafts removed in 4 hours flat. I was glad to have that part out of the way quickly so I could get started on the swap quicker.

[IMG]1E7295D9-1AC9-4D4F-93BB-ACD6F0DF29F3 by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]462FF623-C39B-448B-9E38-5C7631A87BA0 by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr[/IMG]

Since I had been gathering parts for about 6 months and had been preparing for this, I wasted no time starting the swap process. I also miss the truck already. I got the engine up to the barn from my garage and started tearing things off I knew I didn't need.

[IMG]Untitled by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr[/IMG]

Anyone who is considering a swap like this, study as many swaps into a vehicle like yours like I did with Greengeeker's and Honeybadger's swaps, but also study other types of swaps because you'll learn extra things you may not get from other build threads.

I'll cut this first post here and continue it in another page. Also, being new to the forums, I'm not sure how to make pictures work on a post, so any pointers would be welcome. For now, you all will have to click the links to the pictures of the swap.

Last edited by RamblingswithRyan; May 5th, 2020 at 18:21.
RamblingswithRyan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2020, 20:54   #2
HoneyBadger
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: San Jose, CA
Fuel Economy: Always over 40
Default

Awesome! You started a thread!

I DM'd you about how to post the pictures from Flckr, hopefully that works for you.

Continuing our conversation about firewalls from my thread since you're looking at mounting your ECU. I wonder if you have one of the last 94s that was sold as a 95. I was at pick-n-pull yesterday looking for parts and there was a 94 and 95 ranger that I looked at.

The 94 had the ECU next to the clutch and the bulk head connector was round.
The 95 had the ECU above the cabin air box and had 3 square bulk head connectors.

Does your truck have OBD 1 or 2?
HoneyBadger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4th, 2020, 03:18   #3
oilhammer
Certified Volkswagen Nut Vendor
 
oilhammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: outside St Louis (where it's safe)
Fuel Economy: fantastic
Default

In '95, the Ranger (and its Mazda B-truck clone) got a new dashboard, that coincided with a handful of other changes to the firewall and HVAC. '94 is actually a weird year, since it was first for R134a and SRS, but last for the old dash. So there are a few unique pieces on it. They also got "partial" OBD2 compliance... that was a transitional period for a lot of manufacturers, as they knew what they had to do for the 1996 mandates, and if things were being updated or changed in '95, or a new model was being offered for the '95 model year, chances are they integrated much of the '96 stuff ahead of time. Volkswagen did, too. The '95 Golfs and Jettas had an OBD2 type DLC in the dash, even though they were not fully OBD2 compliance (no readiness monitors, no evap system checking, no post-catalyst oxygen sensor, etc.).

With Ford, it was the transition from EECIV to EECV (Electronic Engine Control version 4, to version 5... 5 being OBD2, but Ford's EECV was really just EECIV with a few minimal must-haves layered over the top). Which was always fun regarding diagnostics, as the Hickock test tool (we still have ours, and it still works great) allowed the OBD2 stuff essentially two entirely separate test modes. The "new" style, retrieving the Pxxx DTCs as with all OBD2 vehicles, and the "KOER/KOEO" test modes with the XX DTCs same as before. Always a fun method to try and figure things out.

Of course, none of this matters if you are placing a much newer VAG engine under the hood.
__________________
oilhammer
www.cardocautomotive.com
oilhammer is online now   Reply With Quote
Old May 4th, 2020, 06:26   #4
RamblingswithRyan
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Ohio
Fuel Economy: Not sure yet
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HoneyBadger View Post
Continuing our conversation about firewalls from my thread since you're looking at mounting your ECU. I wonder if you have one of the last 94s that was sold as a 95. I was at pick-n-pull yesterday looking for parts and there was a 94 and 95 ranger that I looked at.

The 94 had the ECU next to the clutch and the bulk head connector was round.
The 95 had the ECU above the cabin air box and had 3 square bulk head connectors.

Does your truck have OBD 1 or 2?
I have OBD 1. The bulkhead connector is round. I would remove the stock Ranger ECU except for my worries that some things may still be controlled through it that I would like to keep. I have a standalone wiring harness from Fast Forward Automotive, but I'm not sure what the truck may need in order to "think."

[IMG]8B1EB574-5A70-401A-BC7D-E03415E23B64 by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr[/IMG]

Regarding what you said, Oilhammer, I may very well have a 1994 B4000 cab, being that it's a body swapped Ranger. But like you said, it doesn't super matter since I am putting a VW engine and ECU in it.
RamblingswithRyan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2020, 09:39   #5
HoneyBadger
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: San Jose, CA
Fuel Economy: Always over 40
Default

It's funny how much gets changed each year during each generation for vehicles. When I was researching wiring and getting my tach to read properly, going from reading 6 cyl. to 4cyl, I found that 93-94 did it one way, 95 another, and 96-97 a different way from the other two. My truck was OBD2 compliant enough for smog, and gave Pxxxx codes, but sounds like just barely. Which follows what oilhammer was saying. I guess our trucks aren't quite as similar as we thought. But where would the fun be if they were exactly the same, huh?

You probably don't need the ECU, but you'll want to check. I believe the 93-97 all had GEM (general electronic management) units. This is a box under the dash that controls all the stuff on the body that isn't the engine or transmission. Basically, warning chimes, 4x4 control, cabin lights all that stuff. If you have one of those, then you should be fine to remove the ECU since it should only have controlled the engine.

Hopefully some of that is helpful.
HoneyBadger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2020, 16:15   #6
RamblingswithRyan
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Ohio
Fuel Economy: Not sure yet
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HoneyBadger View Post
You probably don't need the ECU, but you'll want to check. I believe the 93-97 all had GEM (general electronic management) units. This is a box under the dash that controls all the stuff on the body that isn't the engine or transmission. Basically, warning chimes, 4x4 control, cabin lights all that stuff. If you have one of those, then you should be fine to remove the ECU since it should only have controlled the engine.

Hopefully some of that is helpful.
Very helpful, yes. I believe I do have generic ECUís for all those things. I know for a fact I have a separate 4x4 ECU. Maybe Iíll unplug the PCM and see if the interior stuff works and the 4x4. If it does, then eh, Iíll just remove it. Other than it looking a little more messy, I donít mind it being there. I think my plan is to make an aluminum box for the VW ECU right behind the stock fuse/relay box in the engine bay. Iíll utilize the stock VW mount and integrate it into the aluminum box.

Anybody know if the VW ECU is sealed enough to get wet without it being hurt? I know itís right under dash in a Beetle. Not particularly in amongst the elements.
RamblingswithRyan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2020, 18:59   #7
RamblingswithRyan
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Ohio
Fuel Economy: Not sure yet
Default

I immediately jumped into mocking the engine up in the engine bay, seeing what would fit and what would need to be fiddled with.

[IMG]BC6CF2A5-9375-49C3-8B2F-3F65D900CE12 by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr[/IMG]

D8828D43-90B6-4AD3-BD91-48236E9A521D by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr

Thankfully, Honeybadger has done a lot of figuring out for this gen of Ranger already. I knew I needed to remove the a/c compressor and cut the portion of the bracket off that holds the a/c compressor and alternator. This is needed in order to clear the steering box on the Ranger. This is different from the 1998-2012 Ranger because that year of Ranger has a steering rack and it's a whole other can of worms. A lot of what I have to say about initial fitment of the engine is repeating of what Honeybadger has done in his build swap. If you haven't already, you should read it. https://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=455909
If you have read it, plan to probably read it again because the 1990-1997 year-span of Ranger has some sticky spots. I didn't find it to be horribly hard in retrospect, but it will really help you out if you learn a few pointers. Also, read Greengeeker's forum. It has a lot of technical info that is very helpful, even though his Ranger is a 2001 and is not 4x4.

Initially, your biggest fight will be for clearance between the turbo actuator valve and your engine mount, and between your alternator and steering box.

The clearance between the turbo actuator valve and engine mount, in my case, was determined by how low you make the engine sit, how far back you put the engine in the truck, and the clocking of the engine in relation to the trans.
[IMG]5E9DCF70-1151-4A0B-8B31-606CD5E8F9F2 by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]Untitled by Ryan Vincent, on Flickr[/IMG]

This picture was taken in initial mock-up of the engine so it may be sitting slightly different now, but if it is it's a minute difference. I ended up with about a fingertip's (about 1/2" in my case) worth of space between the actuator valve and the engine mount. It could probably be closer and it really wouldn't hit anything, but I wanted plenty of space to have access to the engine mount nut. It is easy to access the nut and I wouldn't change anything on that side of the engine.

I don't have a picture of the steering box and alternator clearance which is strange since it's a big part of the mock-up process. I'll have to snap one and edit it in later. Basically, the front lower edge of your alternator is going to be close to the top/side of your steering box. Clearance here will also be determined by the same factors that the turbo actuator valve clearance had. Clocking, how far fore and aft, and how low or high the engine is in the engine bay. In retrospect, my engine ended up needing to be tilted downward in the rear more than I expected, so I could have gotten away with the clearances being tighter. Again, I will add a picture.

Forewarning, if you follow the height/clocking setup I have, you will either need a body lift or a clearance hole in the hood in order to close the hood. Another option is to look for a cowl hood. That may clear. With the stock hood, the intake is just a little too tall. I don't like body lifts and I already have a pretty tall truck, so I have chosen to cut a hole in the hood. I will make sure it doesn't look janky, but it's not a sleeper nor is it a show truck.
RamblingswithRyan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2020, 18:23   #8
Nozzleman
Veteran Member
 
Nozzleman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: About 15 miles from Venus
Default

I am running the EDGE hood and grill and just barely cleared the PD150 intake. I have a coil spring truck.
__________________
2003 Jetta (wifes)

2002 Ford Ranger ALH. IT'S ALIIIIVE!

1978 Ford F250 4x4 Supercab 6bta, NV4500, Dana70/60.
Nozzleman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 2nd, 2020, 07:59   #9
evguy1
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Erington, BC, Canada
Default

The Ranger station is also a good place for information and wiring help.
Here is my 05 build and it was the first TDI swap that I had running. https://www.therangerstation.com/for...ersion.161412/
__________________
2000 Jeep XJ / BEW http://www.cherokeeforum.com/f46/2000-tdi-blacky-205238/
2008 Dodge Dakota / Cummins ISB170 https://tdconversions.com/dakota-cummins-isb170
2005 Ford Ranger / 1.9 TDI https://tdconversions.com/ranger-1-9l-tdi
evguy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
tdi ranger swap 40 ford paul TDI 101 2 February 8th, 2020 05:24
1995 4runner alh tdi swap ??s brady rogers TDI Conversions 3 March 20th, 2019 11:43
Another Ranger/Mazda pick up TDi swap Jerz TDI Conversions 26 March 5th, 2016 07:16
1995 Cabrio TDI Swap jkpenner TDI Conversions 9 July 25th, 2012 08:25
TDI to Ford Ranger Swap. JarHead TDI Conversions 9 April 4th, 2012 08:55


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 14:18.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright - TDIClub Online LTD - 2017
Contact Us | Privacy Statement | Forum Rules | Disclaimer
TDIClub Online Ltd (TDIClub.com) is not affiliated with the VWoA or VWAG and is supported by contributions from viewers like you.
© 1996 - 2020, All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.14219 seconds with 12 queries
[Output: 104.60 Kb. compressed to 91.52 Kb. by saving 13.08 Kb. (12.51%)]