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VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas Discussions area for A5/MkV Jetta/Golf (2005/2006 PD and 2009 CR).

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Old June 22nd, 2018, 19:30   #16
sptsailing
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Default Subframe removal does help, Oilhammer is right

So based on Oilhammer's recommendation and procedure description, I removed the subframe, as I am having the typical difficulties in removing the EGR cooler and wanted more working room. I wrote numbers on the bolts and the frame near the bolts with a marker so I can put each back where it came from. I do plan on cleaning them. My floor jack functioned like a transmission jack and the part easily came off. The 2 longest of the supposedly single use bolts have an unusual shape and some sort of grease on the working end threads. I am guessing that the subframe together with the dogbone assembly probably weigh under 25 lbs, but I am tired and don't care to weigh it right now. It is very nice to have all that additional working room on the back side of the engine.
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Old June 25th, 2018, 08:33   #17
Nohlan_4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sptsailing View Post
So based on Oilhammer's recommendation and procedure description, I removed the subframe, as I am having the typical difficulties in removing the EGR cooler and wanted more working room. I wrote numbers on the bolts and the frame near the bolts with a marker so I can put each back where it came from. I do plan on cleaning them. My floor jack functioned like a transmission jack and the part easily came off. The 2 longest of the supposedly single use bolts have an unusual shape and some sort of grease on the working end threads. I am guessing that the subframe together with the dogbone assembly probably weigh under 25 lbs, but I am tired and don't care to weigh it right now. It is very nice to have all that additional working room on the back side of the engine.
What was the problem with the EGR? there is lots of room to get that out with the axle out no? The hardest item to get out for me was the exhaust catalyst....it was tight in there.
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Old June 25th, 2018, 08:53   #18
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Yep, catalyst will fall right out with no subframe in place.
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Old June 25th, 2018, 13:52   #19
sptsailing
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Default Mission creep redux

OK, so earlier this year, I knew I needed to replace a driver side passenger door lock, the cooling water pump, the exhaust leaky EGR cooler, the front brakes and pads and the A/C RCV. Then the cam failed bad enough to cause the 'pup-pup' symptom. Digging into it, I found that the #3 exhaust cam had worn a hole in the exhaust lifter, so Franko6 successfully convinced me I not only needed to replace the cam and lifters, but the oil pump as well, which requires removing the oil pan (reservoir, whatever). Digging into this, I then observed my outer CV joint boots were both ripped at the small end, but no grease had been yet lost. Removing and inspecting both axles convinced me that at least one of the CV joints on each axle was bad, so these have been sent to http://www.cvaxles.com/index.html for refurbishment. With the front axles off, examinations revealed the port wheel bearing to be quite bad and the starboard one to be unacceptably noisy as well. I ordered more parts from IDparts, even though Amazon had them available for slightly less. Oh, and then I had to stop everything and replace the brake pads on all 4 wheels of my Honda Odyssey, delaying my VW progress another day, but that is another whole story. (Hondas seem easier to work on to me.)

When considering the easiest way to do some of this work, I concluded that removing 5 bolts and completely removing the EGR valve assembly would be a good idea. This revealed a great deal of gunk build-up in the intake manifold (even though that is not the VW nomenclature for it) and the EGR valve assembly. So now the Turbo will need to come out so I can clean the crap out of it, and with that, perhaps I can find out why there is so much oil in the EGR and turbo cooler hoses.

MANY Thanks to all who have posted useful observations and advice, especially Oilhammer. If I lived closer to either Franko6 or Oilhammer, I would gladly have simply paid them to fix all this stuff, but I knew of no VW TDI guru close to Clearwater, FL. If this car was less satisfying to drive and less amazing than it is, it would have been junked, but it is very hard to let go of such a ride.

What amazes me still, is how well this car has been running all these years with numerous serious problems. Now if I can only figure out how to re-engineer behind the hood such that 1/2 bushel of leaves and dirt will no longer accumulate in between the fender and the wheel splash plastic.

Back to work for me.....
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Old June 27th, 2018, 16:31   #20
Nohlan_4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sptsailing View Post
OK, so earlier this year, I knew I needed to replace a driver side passenger door lock, the cooling water pump, the exhaust leaky EGR cooler, the front brakes and pads and the A/C RCV. Then the cam failed bad enough to cause the 'pup-pup' symptom. Digging into it, I found that the #3 exhaust cam had worn a hole in the exhaust lifter, so Franko6 successfully convinced me I not only needed to replace the cam and lifters, but the oil pump as well, which requires removing the oil pan (reservoir, whatever). Digging into this, I then observed my outer CV joint boots were both ripped at the small end, but no grease had been yet lost. Removing and inspecting both axles convinced me that at least one of the CV joints on each axle was bad, so these have been sent to http://www.cvaxles.com/index.html for refurbishment. With the front axles off, examinations revealed the port wheel bearing to be quite bad and the starboard one to be unacceptably noisy as well. I ordered more parts from IDparts, even though Amazon had them available for slightly less. Oh, and then I had to stop everything and replace the brake pads on all 4 wheels of my Honda Odyssey, delaying my VW progress another day, but that is another whole story. (Hondas seem easier to work on to me.)

When considering the easiest way to do some of this work, I concluded that removing 5 bolts and completely removing the EGR valve assembly would be a good idea. This revealed a great deal of gunk build-up in the intake manifold (even though that is not the VW nomenclature for it) and the EGR valve assembly. So now the Turbo will need to come out so I can clean the crap out of it, and with that, perhaps I can find out why there is so much oil in the EGR and turbo cooler hoses.

MANY Thanks to all who have posted useful observations and advice, especially Oilhammer. If I lived closer to either Franko6 or Oilhammer, I would gladly have simply paid them to fix all this stuff, but I knew of no VW TDI guru close to Clearwater, FL. If this car was less satisfying to drive and less amazing than it is, it would have been junked, but it is very hard to let go of such a ride.

What amazes me still, is how well this car has been running all these years with numerous serious problems. Now if I can only figure out how to re-engineer behind the hood such that 1/2 bushel of leaves and dirt will no longer accumulate in between the fender and the wheel splash plastic.

Back to work for me.....
Large amounts of oil in the intake tract can be a failing turbo centre section. Mine started like that until the compressor actually started contacting the compressor housing making a high pitched whining sound I would budget for a turbo soon.
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Old June 27th, 2018, 18:26   #21
sptsailing
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Default Mission creep continued, but why does VW want you to renew every nut and bolt?

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Originally Posted by Nohlan_4 View Post
Large amounts of oil in the intake tract can be a failing turbo centre section. Mine started like that until the compressor actually started contacting the compressor housing making a high pitched whining sound I would budget for a turbo soon.
That is what I had been given to understand as well, but on further investigating the charge air pathway, I did not find much oil there at all, less, actually than I had found several years ago. I read a post from Oilhammer emphasizing the need for a good crankcase vacuum, as without it, I understood from his post that oil would wind up in the charge air path. It was only in the past year or so that my vacuum was actually finally working well, this due to a previously undiscovered vacuum reservoir leak.

Anyway, I had decided since I had several significant parts apart already, I might as well check on other, related items. To my great disappointment, I found the EGR and intake manifold to be caked with thick, black and gooey deposits. So off with the turbo so I could remove the intake manifold for cleaning. Checking the turbo, it looks amazingly good and everything seems to be in order, not even needing much in the way of cleaning, except on the outside.

This has turned out to be a good time for me to eliminate the fitting over the exhaust manifold that directs hot air to the air cleaner. According to the Bentley manual, this should only be on engines operating in cold climates, in which Florida is not. I do need to fashion or buy a heat shield to replace it though. I cannot seem to find a VW part number for it, nor a source.
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Old July 1st, 2018, 15:58   #22
tooreal
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Default I am going to do the same things to my TDI & will Look at Your POST as a Refrense.

Hello Nohlan_4,
Id like to know how Happy you were with the CV Axles that you ordered from CVO Axles, after getting them installed and Driving for a few weeks? Im sure any TDI with 190K+ Miles would Need New Axles with Boots & Wheel Bearings, and So Much More?
Thank you for starting a Detailed Thread for replacing or repairing All Of the Parts that need to be Inspected, replaced or Rebuilt on your 06 JETTA TDI. I am going to have to Replace the Water Pump, Timing Belt, Tensioner & Belt & everything one typically replaces at 192K Miles, While removing the EGR & inspecting along with the Turbo Charger while locating and Repairing a small oil leak around the EGR Cooler. Then Repairing the wiring Harness from the Drivers Door to correct the door locking Effectiveness so it will Lock 100% Of the time! I will be locating the cause of All Of these Fault Codes P0101, P2564, P00361, P01552, P00928 and Correcting them and All Drive Axles & Boots, then change the Coil Springs & Caps on front Struts and Rear Koni Shocks I paid a Mechanic to install, and later noticed He Had Not changed the Springs or Caps in the Process? I purchased and installed a New Smart Actuator & Used a Vacuum Pump & Gage to set it at the Minimum & Maximum positions. Everything worked perfectly with No Fault Codes at all & my Car Ran like New! Then I got the Fault Code indicating there was less than 3 Volts going to Actuator P2564? Car runs Great, checked for a short in the wiring around Turbo & EGR Cooler but was never able to find any obvious Insulation causing wiring to short and Cause me to have the CEL staying On the Display Of the instrument cluster.
I Love My TDI Too, and will Drive my Honda While JETTA is on the Jack Stands & getting a Thorough Examination While replacing any and All parts that Do wear Out in about 200K Miles so I will have a Great Driving VW TDI for another 11+ Years. I also Hope to Find Out why my TDI Averages 33 mpg, but with Heavy weight inside my Car (Im Moving) I have Gotten fuel mileage in the 52 MPG Range? It Should get closer to 50 MPG without loaded down with 800-1200 Lbs. Nothing Handles as Well or Has the performance of the TDI, So I want to Keep it Running Well as Long as I possibly can!
I am going to Bookmark this thread for reference when I start updating my Mk5 TDI Type 2.
This Forum is the Best place for Every TDI Enthusiast and Driver!
Thank You for your Posting & Everybody that added to it.
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Old July 9th, 2018, 11:27   #23
Nohlan_4
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Originally Posted by sptsailing View Post
That is what I had been given to understand as well, but on further investigating the charge air pathway, I did not find much oil there at all, less, actually than I had found several years ago. I read a post from Oilhammer emphasizing the need for a good crankcase vacuum, as without it, I understood from his post that oil would wind up in the charge air path. It was only in the past year or so that my vacuum was actually finally working well, this due to a previously undiscovered vacuum reservoir leak.

Anyway, I had decided since I had several significant parts apart already, I might as well check on other, related items. To my great disappointment, I found the EGR and intake manifold to be caked with thick, black and gooey deposits. So off with the turbo so I could remove the intake manifold for cleaning. Checking the turbo, it looks amazingly good and everything seems to be in order, not even needing much in the way of cleaning, except on the outside.

This has turned out to be a good time for me to eliminate the fitting over the exhaust manifold that directs hot air to the air cleaner. According to the Bentley manual, this should only be on engines operating in cold climates, in which Florida is not. I do need to fashion or buy a heat shield to replace it though. I cannot seem to find a VW part number for it, nor a source.
Could be either problem really. My charge pipe was leaking oil quite bad though and the egr and intake had very visible oil residue not carbon build up.
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Old July 23rd, 2018, 10:53   #24
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Default Subframe bolts reuse torque values?

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I lower the subframe/steering assembly on the trans jack, but you could just as easily use a floor jack, just have to keep it balanced is all. I can heft the whole thing off and back on to the jack by myself (because we only have one such jack, so sometimes someone else in the shop needs it while I am doing whatever it is I am doing that requires its removal).

I do not replace any bolts. I do take care not to just blindly blast them on though. Never been an issue. I also make sure to get them back how they were placement wise.
I removed the subframe as you suggested and it did indeed make much needed room available for the EGR and turbo removal and re-installation. With the dog-bone still attached, it only weighs about 13-1/4 lbs. Many thanks for the advice!

If reusing the same bolts, what torque settings do you recommend?
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Old July 23rd, 2018, 11:04   #25
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I just snug them down, I really could not give you a "setting" no more than a surgeon could give you a value on high tight to pull stitches or how many to use. I just go by feel, sorry.

I do clean the threads up if they are the least bit crusty, and I always spray some WD40 in the holes before I go back in, and use my cheater hand crank bar to do the initial snug so I can easily align it to the witness marks from before. Then I use my 1/2" drive ratchet and give them a twist by hand.
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