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Go Back   TDIClub Forums > TDI Model Specific Discussions Areas > VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas

VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas Discussions area for A5/MkV Jetta/Golf (2005/2006 PD and 2009 CR).

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Old September 6th, 2018, 12:45   #16
jreich
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Originally Posted by Vince Waldon View Post
Yup, I'd agree that cam looks like it's at TDC.

If you can blow air out of #1 right now (confirming a valve on #1 is open at this point... and if there's no air with the cam removed... then yes I'd guess there's a wrong part in the valve train... most likely either the valve stem on the valves is too long or the lifters too thick. Could be the wrong cam too, I suppose.

If you've got part numbers of the stuff you ordered maybe post 'em up and see if the hive mind can confirm one why or t'other?
Vince,
I didn't replace the intake valves, so I find it heard to believe they are bad. I bought the cam kit from IDParts.com along with the intervalves exhaust valves. The cam is from AMC part number 666863K. I looked it up and it looks like it is meant for BRMs. The lifters are also from AMC and that part number is 668581. They came in a box as a kit. I called IDParts and they don't seem to think the cam kit is wrong, but there are a limited number of variables. 1) wrong cam grind, 2) wrong lifters (or out of spec) 3) valve seats not in spec 4) valves too long. I don't believe I put the intake valves back in the head incorrectly, but even if i did, i don't see how the intake valves could stay open. I double check the valve keepers to make sure they were put in correctly. The car was running just fine before the tandem pump failed causing damage to the exhaust valves. I find it hard to believe the OEM intake valves (which were not replaced) are bad or the valve seats are so bad that there is that much air escaping. After all, without the cam the valves make perfect contact with the head and does not leak into the exhaust or intake ports. I can't easily measure the cam profile since I don't have the equipment. I have a cheap dial gauge caliper.
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Old September 6th, 2018, 22:08   #17
Ol'Rattler
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Originally Posted by sptsailing View Post
Doing it the way Vince suggested will work, but may not actually be completely necessary.
I have just installed a Franko6 camshaft in my TDI. I did so by rotating the crankshaft 90 degrees counterclockwise from TDC, but installing the camshaft with the #1 lobes both pointed forward, installing the cam sprocket then rotating the cam back to the TDC position prior to rotating the crank back clockwise to TDC. My car runs great now, so this method must work. Contact Franko6 and take his advice if you want your car to work correctly.
Additional explanation. With the crank 90 degrees counterclockwise from TDC, all of the pistons are half way down their bores and you can turn the cam anywhere you want without risk of damage.
What you do is leave the crank at 90 degrees CCW, install the head, install the camshaft and set the lash for the injectors. Remember at this point, you can still turn the cam anywhere you like without damage.

After the injector lash is adjusted, you turn the cam any direction you like to TDC and pin it and then turn the crank 90 degrees CW and pin it and you are ready to install the T/B. Just like Frank explained it to me......................
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Last edited by Ol'Rattler; September 6th, 2018 at 22:13.
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Old September 7th, 2018, 17:28   #18
jreich
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So I looked again, and the valves are sitting below the valve keepers. That is definitely the problem. Dumb me Does anyone have a DIY head on valve spring compressor? Do you think I will need compressed air in the cylinder when compressing the valve springs? Even at TDC, the valve would probably drop 1-2 mm?
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Old September 7th, 2018, 21:02   #19
Vince Waldon
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The top of the piston makes an excellent valve stop that should work to redo the keepers... just be gentle.

Worth a try at least, otherwise yup compressed air.
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Old September 14th, 2018, 12:47   #20
jreich
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Well it worked. I bought a valve spring compressor that you bolt to the ends of the head. I was able to fix all the keepers and the car fired up!! The valves probably dropped 1-2mm when resting on the pistons, but the tool worked like a champ (cheap 20 dollar ebay china compressor). Time for a road test. I am slightly worried about the oil pump going through all of the metal shavings from the lifters. Is there an easy way to read the oil pressure?? I bought the mini can OBDII a while back, just never used it.
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Old September 14th, 2018, 15:04   #21
Vince Waldon
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Oil pressure is not monitored by the ECU... not even the low pressure switch... so it can't report anything via OBD2.

A gauge plumbed in where the low pressure switch goes is really your only option in terms of getting actual readings.
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Old September 14th, 2018, 19:18   #22
sptsailing
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When I replaced my cam due to failure and holing in one of the lifters, Franko6 advised me that the wisest thing to do would be to replace the oil pump as well. This of course requires removing then reinstalling the oil reservoir, which is an inherently undesirable activity, but I took his advice and did so. The old oil pump did show some scoring, but my neighbor, who an expert mechanic for the Coast Guard and their mechanics trainer for the C-130, inspected it and said it did not look bad.
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Old September 16th, 2018, 06:03   #23
jreich
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When I replaced my cam due to failure and holing in one of the lifters, Franko6 advised me that the wisest thing to do would be to replace the oil pump as well. This of course requires removing then reinstalling the oil reservoir, which is an inherently undesirable activity, but I took his advice and did so. The old oil pump did show some scoring, but my neighbor, who an expert mechanic for the Coast Guard and their mechanics trainer for the C-130, inspected it and said it did not look bad.
That's good to know. Franko6 mentioned that to me too. This is the 2rd camshaft to go into the car. The first was replaced at around 150k with a BEW febi, now at 280k with an OEM style BRM cam from AMS. When I pulled out the lifters, one was wearing through the metal, the rest just had spider cracks from the valves hitting the pistons. I've put almost 500 miles on the car since the head rebuild, so far so good. The fuel economy from the computer doesn't seem to be as good as before, but I need to calculate the actual MPG instead of looking at the computer. I am getting about 38 MPGs in rainy conditions according to the computer going about 70-75 MPH. I had the timing lined up pretty good so my torsion values are probably pretty close to the spec. As much as I dislike the bentley manual, it has a pretty good description on how to change the timing belt.
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