www.tdiclub.com

Economy - Longevity - Performance
The #1 Source of TDI Information on the Web!
Forums Articles Links Meets
Orders TDI Club Cards TDIFest 2016 Gone, but not forgotten VAG-Com List Unit Conversions TDIClub Chat Thank You

Order your TDIClub merchandise and help support TDIClub


Go Back   TDIClub Forums > VW TDI Discussion Areas > TDI News/Tech

TDI News/Tech This Forum is for the posting of TDI news related items.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old April 28th, 2020, 05:29   #61
oilhammer
Certified Volkswagen Nut Vendor
 
oilhammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: outside St Louis (where it's safe)
Fuel Economy: fantastic
Default

There are some GM ambulances running gasoline engines, yes. Ford for a long time refused to build any E or F series with gasoline engines for ambulance prep, due to fires, but have changed this stance in recent years. Lots of gasser Transits running around in ambulance trim. But the F-truck based ones all are still diesels from what I have seen. All the Sprinters are diesels.
__________________
oilhammer
www.cardocautomotive.com
oilhammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2020, 07:57   #62
kjclow
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Charlotte, NC
Fuel Economy: 55 max / 44 avg on beetle ~37 on JSW
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by turbobrick240 View Post
I probably use the high idle setting on my 7.3 more than any of the other settings. It doesn't have any of the problematic emissions stuff, but I was warned that they like to wet stack if idled for long periods in cold weather. I also think it warms up much faster and charges the batteries better at high idle. I wonder if there has been any trend back to big block gasser motors in ambulances and such that can't afford to have breakdowns and lots of downtime.
From a tv blurb the other day, Charlotte has a lot of issues with the Navistar engines and as such have about half a dozen extra ambulances sitting throughout the city to pick up when one of the others goes down. I don't remember them specifying if the new vehicles were diesel or gas.
__________________
2010 silver/black JSW TDI with DSG, 2017 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel
kjclow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2020, 17:35   #63
turbobrick240
Veteran Member
 
turbobrick240's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: maine
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjclow View Post
From a tv blurb the other day, Charlotte has a lot of issues with the Navistar engines and as such have about half a dozen extra ambulances sitting throughout the city to pick up when one of the others goes down. I don't remember them specifying if the new vehicles were diesel or gas.
Ugh. Unreliability is the worst possible quality in an emergency vehicle. My newly acquired dune buggy is proving to be less than rock solid reliable as well. The B6 engine code indicates it's a 1970 1600cc single port 57 hp. Tried driving it home and it bogged out about a mile down the road. Pretty sure it's a fuel issue, though much of the wiring is pretty crumbly looking. And the coil appears to be an antique. Oh well, at least I enjoy tinkering.
turbobrick240 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2020, 03:22   #64
oilhammer
Certified Volkswagen Nut Vendor
 
oilhammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: outside St Louis (where it's safe)
Fuel Economy: fantastic
Default

Having cut my teeth on, and still mess with, the air-cooled cars as well as having bought/resurrected/sold a LOT of basket case rail buggies, etc. I can tell you two things I have learned:

They are super, super simple (a good thing).

They are quite often neglected (a bad thing).

In the case of the buggies, it usually goes like this:

Some guy decides to build one, he blows his whole wad on the frame. Slaps a bunch of used and questionable bits on it, has " a buddy" help him wire it up (never mind this same buddy's mobile home burnt down the year before after he installed a light switch), then they take it "wheelin'" and tear the living crap out of it unmerciful.

It breaks. Then it sits. And sits. And sits. Fixes are attempted. It breaks again. Tax return comes, they blow that on giant tires... now it breaks even faster. Sits some more. Squirrels get under the cover it hides under (these are never actually stored under a roof). They chew a few things. It sits some more.

Another buddy comes over, with a case of Coors and says "Hey, man, whatcha need ta get that there thing goin' again?". The answer is always "aw, shucks, just needs a bat'ry 'n she'll fire right up!". It never just needs a battery, and it never just fires right up. The fuel in it is now closer to shoe polish than gasoline... the tank is of course simply vented to atmosphere, no evaporative emissions collection bits on these, so all the volatiles have long since vacated the gasoline and only left behind the tar. Rain of course found its way in too, somehow. These almost always have the cheapest most garbage Autozone level open air cleaner, and the squirrel ate half the element away, and the tarp that was "new" when Reagan was in office is now barely held together and offers little to no protection from the elements. Even the squirrels have moved on (they now live in the motorhome, also abandoned and never used in the same driveway... ask the owner what it will take to get it going and, the answer inevitably will be " just needs a bat'ry".

So now you come along.... I have been in that same place. There is no "easy" way to undo the wrongs. Best bet is to start from scratch, or at least, as low of a common denominator as your budget/wife/residence/lifestyle/religion will allow. I always start with the electrics and the fuel system. The engine needs very little to run. You can isolate the entire other mess of the electrical system (it is always a mess) and just concentrate on the starter, and the power wire to the ignition coil which also will jump over to the stop solenoid and choke element on the carburetor. It needs that, and of course the ground, and that is all the electrics the engine needs to run. Charging system needs a couple more wires (you may need to polarize the generator again to make it work the best... ask me if you need to).

Probably best to either professionally clean out or just replace the fuel tank. The cheap "barrel" aluminum ones corrode up badly on the insides, if that is what it uses. Solex carbs (especially the 30s like your B engine from 1970 *should" have assuming it is all correct) is super easy to rebuild. You can often even buy those carbs brand spanking new (Brosal brand) if you want. And the mechanical fuel pump (these are almost always bad from rotten gas). Cheap and easy and widely available new. And make sure to get the correct 7mm fuel lines, these are smaller than most modern cars, as well as all the EFI air cooled Volkswagen engines.
__________________
oilhammer
www.cardocautomotive.com
oilhammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2020, 05:01   #65
turbobrick240
Veteran Member
 
turbobrick240's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: maine
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by oilhammer View Post
Having cut my teeth on, and still mess with, the air-cooled cars as well as having bought/resurrected/sold a LOT of basket case rail buggies, etc. I can tell you two things I have learned:
They are super, super simple (a good thing).
They are quite often neglected (a bad thing).
In the case of the buggies, it usually goes like this:
Some guy decides to build one, he blows his whole wad on the frame. Slaps a bunch of used and questionable bits on it, has " a buddy" help him wire it up (never mind this same buddy's mobile home burnt down the year before after he installed a light switch), then they take it "wheelin'" and tear the living crap out of it unmerciful.
It breaks. Then it sits. And sits. And sits. Fixes are attempted. It breaks again. Tax return comes, they blow that on giant tires... now it breaks even faster. Sits some more. Squirrels get under the cover it hides under (these are never actually stored under a roof). They chew a few things. It sits some more.
Another buddy comes over, with a case of Coors and says "Hey, man, whatcha need ta get that there thing goin' again?". The answer is always "aw, shucks, just needs a bat'ry 'n she'll fire right up!". It never just needs a battery, and it never just fires right up. The fuel in it is now closer to shoe polish than gasoline... the tank is of course simply vented to atmosphere, no evaporative emissions collection bits on these, so all the volatiles have long since vacated the gasoline and only left behind the tar. Rain of course found its way in too, somehow. These almost always have the cheapest most garbage Autozone level open air cleaner, and the squirrel ate half the element away, and the tarp that was "new" when Reagan was in office is now barely held together and offers little to no protection from the elements. Even the squirrels have moved on (they now live in the motorhome, also abandoned and never used in the same driveway... ask the owner what it will take to get it going and, the answer inevitably will be " just needs a bat'ry".
So now you come along.... I have been in that same place. There is no "easy" way to undo the wrongs. Best bet is to start from scratch, or at least, as low of a common denominator as your budget/wife/residence/lifestyle/religion will allow. I always start with the electrics and the fuel system. The engine needs very little to run. You can isolate the entire other mess of the electrical system (it is always a mess) and just concentrate on the starter, and the power wire to the ignition coil which also will jump over to the stop solenoid and choke element on the carburetor. It needs that, and of course the ground, and that is all the electrics the engine needs to run. Charging system needs a couple more wires (you may need to polarize the generator again to make it work the best... ask me if you need to).
Probably best to either professionally clean out or just replace the fuel tank. The cheap "barrel" aluminum ones corrode up badly on the insides, if that is what it uses. Solex carbs (especially the 30s like your B engine from 1970 *should" have assuming it is all correct) is super easy to rebuild. You can often even buy those carbs brand spanking new (Brosal brand) if you want. And the mechanical fuel pump (these are almost always bad from rotten gas). Cheap and easy and widely available new. And make sure to get the correct 7mm fuel lines, these are smaller than most modern cars, as well as all the EFI air cooled Volkswagen engines.
Thanks Oilhammer, your description made me laugh- and was pretty spot on of course. Including the ratty old tarp. Fortunately, my buggy has a clean plastic boat fuel cell and somebody put a new carb and filter on within the last couple of years. The throttle linkage is an absolute joke though. I think the stop solenoid may be the culprit. That wire is especially rough and a bit loose on the coil connection. Or it could be a bad fuel pump. You're absolutely right about the simplicity aspect- it's not really any more complex than the air cooled briggs stuff I've tinkered on and torn apart forever. Shouldn't take long to troubleshoot. I know it ran strong for a minute and has good compression.
turbobrick240 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2020, 05:40   #66
oilhammer
Certified Volkswagen Nut Vendor
 
oilhammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: outside St Louis (where it's safe)
Fuel Economy: fantastic
Default

Another thing that likes to kill them is critters building nests in the cooling system. I actually lost a Kohler engine in my previous JD lawn tractor that way.
__________________
oilhammer
www.cardocautomotive.com
oilhammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2020, 05:48   #67
[486]
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: St.Paul, MN
TDI(s): 02 golf ALH
Fuel Economy: 42 stock, 47-49 now
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by oilhammer View Post
Another thing that likes to kill them is critters building nests in the cooling system. I actually lost a Kohler engine in my previous JD lawn tractor that way.
every time the lawn tractor gets started, I gotta fish out the mice with a tig rod
they haven't chewed on the coil wire yet, but now that I've said that...
[486] is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2020, 07:10   #68
90HorseBeetle
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Arlington, VA
Fuel Economy: Beetle 43MPG, Passat 38.2 avg 60 tanks 35-47 Jetta 35-42 avg 38 (40 tanks) Auto Beetle 32-40 avg 36 (80 tanks)
Default

Since this is a TDi thread that guy is crazy the 5 cylinder VW and the 2.0i 8 valve are both atrocious engines, but there's a lot of competition for that prize.

Now I am nostalgic for my '69 camper. After I broke a valve I bought dual port heads and 1835 pistons at the bug out and carried the engine into my basement (try that with any other car) and rebuilt it without touching the bottom end and she was going strong when I stupidly sold it for $525 in '90.
90HorseBeetle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2020, 08:45   #69
flee
Veteran Member
 
flee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Chatsworth, CA
Fuel Economy: 40-ish
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 90HorseBeetle View Post
Since this is a TDi thread that guy is crazy the 5 cylinder VW and the 2.0i 8 valve are both atrocious engines, but there's a lot of competition for that prize.

Now I am nostalgic for my '69 camper. After I broke a valve I bought dual port heads and 1835 pistons at the bug out and carried the engine into my basement (try that with any other car) and rebuilt it without touching the bottom end and she was going strong when I stupidly sold it for $525 in '90.
When I was much younger and stronger that's what I would do with my Corvairs'
engines. How else would you work on them when it's 20 below in the garage?
__________________
2002 Jetta GLS TDI wagon
flee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2020, 07:55   #70
epssax
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Louisville, KY
Fuel Economy: 2014 JSW, 38-40 Suburban driving
Default

I have owned 22 VW diesels along with 6 Mercedes diesels and 6 diesel pickups. I have NEVER had a diesel related engine problem with all these cars. Keep clean oil and filter in them, buy fresh fuel, keep your glow plugs in good order, and a hot battery and you should be able to put 300K on them. When I was younger, I would buy a Rabbit or Dasher at an auction for $50-300 dollars. Most had a bad head gasket. I would get a gasket and timing belt kit(water pump and idler pulley) and put them on, Usually a CV joint was leaking, too. Check the brakes and redo if necessary. Drive the thing like I stole it and come across another one at the auction or local paper and do it all over again. I had a bunch of Rabbits, two Quantums, 3 pickups, 2 dashers, and 7 jettas. Currently my 2014 JSW is very nice and as I get older I let the professionals work on it. Oh, whoever said the VW tdi engine was bad is crazy, just crazy!
epssax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2020, 15:32   #71
WilliamBlack
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Barstow, Ca
TDI(s): 2000 Jetta
Fuel Economy: 42-46 mpg
Default

I am looking for a Jetta TDI mechanic in or near the Barstow area. I'm driving a 2000 Jetta TDI with 237,000 miles on it and have been told that the valve and exhaust re-circulation gaskets are leaking oil. I'm a BH therapist working in a Military hospital and direct care work hours have changed from 5 to 2 days a week. Can someone refer me to a good and reasonable mechanic?
WilliamBlack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2020, 15:56   #72
[486]
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: St.Paul, MN
TDI(s): 02 golf ALH
Fuel Economy: 42 stock, 47-49 now
Default

honestly both of those are very easy DIY projects
and on the other side of the coin, they're also both totally ignorable leaks unless you're dumping in a few quarts between changes
[486] is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2020, 17:09   #73
flee
Veteran Member
 
flee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Chatsworth, CA
Fuel Economy: 40-ish
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamBlack View Post
I am looking for a Jetta TDI mechanic in or near the Barstow area. I'm driving a 2000 Jetta TDI with 237,000 miles on it and have been told that the valve and exhaust re-circulation gaskets are leaking oil. I'm a BH therapist working in a Military hospital and direct care work hours have changed from 5 to 2 days a week. Can someone refer me to a good and reasonable mechanic?
The EGR oil leak is more of a seepage, I'll bet. The amount of loss will be minimal.
You can just wipe the oil off every few days or ignore it.
The valve cover is a common leaker on these oldies. My '02 seeps from there but not enough to worry.
A new valve cover with seal will be cheaper than taking it to a mechanic.
Some folks have removed the valve cover gasket and replaced just the gasket, too.
Then there is gasket sealant if you remove it and clean all the surfaces real well.
__________________
2002 Jetta GLS TDI wagon
flee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2020, 18:20   #74
[486]
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: St.Paul, MN
TDI(s): 02 golf ALH
Fuel Economy: 42 stock, 47-49 now
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by flee View Post
Some folks have removed the valve cover gasket and replaced just the gasket, too.
gasket is bonded to the cover
only options are RTV or a new cover
I used RTV back when I cared, now I just let it oil my driveway
[486] is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2020, 14:22   #75
flee
Veteran Member
 
flee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Chatsworth, CA
Fuel Economy: 40-ish
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by [486] View Post
gasket is bonded to the cover
only options are RTV or a new cover
I used RTV back when I cared, now I just let it oil my driveway
While it is true that the gasket is bonded to the cover, a number of folks have
removed it and replaced it with an aftermarket gasket. Just listing the options.
__________________
2002 Jetta GLS TDI wagon
flee is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (0 members and 2 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Honda Insight is "Biblically terrible. Possibly the worst new car money can buy." Antsrcool General Automotive 82 June 9th, 2009 09:30
HELP: Looking for VW Dealer near Burlington - Named "Russ's" or "Russell" ?? kevk555 Ontario 2 May 26th, 2009 13:21
Interesting Video About Catalytic Converters (and an "Un-Named" car company) flatopete TDI (Diesel) Emissions 1 August 23rd, 2007 17:03
Bush: "Reduce dependence on foreign crude oil." Pseudobrit Fuels & Lubricants 58 September 24th, 2002 11:14


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:18.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright - TDIClub Online LTD - 2017
Contact Us | Privacy Statement | Forum Rules | Disclaimer
TDIClub Online Ltd (TDIClub.com) is not affiliated with the VWoA or VWAG and is supported by contributions from viewers like you.
1996 - 2020, All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.17705 seconds with 11 queries
[Output: 142.91 Kb. compressed to 121.48 Kb. by saving 21.43 Kb. (15.00%)]