www.tdiclub.com

Economy - Longevity - Performance
The #1 Source of TDI Information on the Web!
Forums Articles Links Meets
Orders TDI Club Cards TDIFest 2016 Gone, but not forgotten VAG-Com List Unit Conversions TDIClub Chat Thank You

Order your TDIClub merchandise and help support TDIClub


Go Back   TDIClub Forums > VW TDI Discussion Areas > General VW Discussion

General VW Discussion This is a place for General VW topics (the company, not your vehicle). General topics about a specific vehicle should be posted in the General TDI Dicussion Forum sections for that vehicle platform. A4, A3 & B4, B5, etc.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old February 17th, 2020, 04:49   #1
Kho1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Foley, Al
TDI(s): MKlV
Default Steering upgrade question

Ok fellas, so I’m new to vw, I have a 2005 golf tdi. I have always had and worked on diesels that have oversized tires, so I’m used to upgrading to heavier steering components in order to run them with less maintenance issues. Having a Cummins, the options for heavy duty steering components are endless. So far with vw, that has not been my experience. I would like to run larger wheels on my MK4, but I do realize the stock steering components do take more of a beating running heavier wheels. Does anyone know of any companies that make heavier duty steering components? Or am I going to have to fabricate heavier components myself?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Kho1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 17th, 2020, 05:16   #2
oilhammer
Certified Volkswagen Nut Vendor
 
oilhammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: St Louis
Fuel Economy: fantastic
Default

Yep, you are new to Volkswagen.

You will find the steering and suspension of these cars is not at all as wimpy as what you are likely used to.

Not sure what your angle on "oversized tires" is all about, but if they will fit in the wheel arches and you can stand to drive it, the steering will likely be just fine.
__________________
oilhammer
www.cardocautomotive.com
oilhammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 17th, 2020, 16:54   #3
Kho1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Foley, Al
TDI(s): MKlV
Default

I was considering putting 18” wheels on it, but the previous owner told me he took 18’s off because he was replacing the tie rod ends more often. That was my only concern


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Kho1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 17th, 2020, 17:02   #4
Kho1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Foley, Al
TDI(s): MKlV
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by oilhammer View Post
Yep, you are new to Volkswagen.



You will find the steering and suspension of these cars is not at all as wimpy as what you are likely used to.



Not sure what your angle on "oversized tires" is all about, but if they will fit in the wheel arches and you can stand to drive it, the steering will likely be just fine.


I won’t be putting oversized tires on the golf, just looking at putting some 18”wheels. My experience with oversized tires and steering components come from working mostly with trucks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Kho1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2020, 03:43   #5
oilhammer
Certified Volkswagen Nut Vendor
 
oilhammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: St Louis
Fuel Economy: fantastic
Default

The bigger the wheel, the heavier the wheel, and the lower profile tires are often heavier, and they are pretty much always wider. This all means that the balance needs to be better, or otherwise it will jackhammer the steering components to death. Also, bigger and heavier rotating mass means the brakes will work much harder, which opens up the door for warping of rotors, which further jackhammers the dickens out of steering components.

Good quality wheels/tires/brakes properly balanced and installed should not give much more stress to steering and suspension components, but it is not rocket science to realize that the much harsher ride to the driver and passengers that some of these bling wheel/tire combos give will almost certainly shorten the life of parts that the standard 195-65-15-91H tires would not.

I just had to explain yesterday to some guy who insisted on putting some hoosier commando BF Goodrich LT off road tires on his Lexus GX470 was the reason the truck road/sounded/handled far worse than what Toyota intended.
__________________
oilhammer
www.cardocautomotive.com
oilhammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2020, 16:06   #6
Kho1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Foley, Al
TDI(s): MKlV
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by oilhammer View Post
The bigger the wheel, the heavier the wheel, and the lower profile tires are often heavier, and they are pretty much always wider. This all means that the balance needs to be better, or otherwise it will jackhammer the steering components to death. Also, bigger and heavier rotating mass means the brakes will work much harder, which opens up the door for warping of rotors, which further jackhammers the dickens out of steering components.



Good quality wheels/tires/brakes properly balanced and installed should not give much more stress to steering and suspension components, but it is not rocket science to realize that the much harsher ride to the driver and passengers that some of these bling wheel/tire combos give will almost certainly shorten the life of parts that the standard 195-65-15-91H tires would not.



I just had to explain yesterday to some guy who insisted on putting some hoosier commando BF Goodrich LT off road tires on his Lexus GX470 was the reason the truck road/sounded/handled far worse than what Toyota intended.


Absolutely lol. I worked in a shop for a long time and had this same discussion many times. I was just wondering about parts, just because I know on my Cummins, I have upgraded the trac bar, tierod ends, ball joints, suspension etc. to make it last longer and ride like a stock truck. I just didn’t know if it was possible to do the same with my golf.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Kho1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 20th, 2020, 18:35   #7
Rrusse11
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: PA Deutsch Country
Default

Read this thread;
http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=133342
Then decide what kind of handling car you want.

Personally I'm a fan of 16" rims, and something nobody seems to get,
stiffening the monocoque body. A top strut tie bar and an internal rear
cabin brace for your Golf will stiffen our little box for a couple hundred.

Not a fan of poly bushings et al, or rear sway bars. Get some good shocks,
springs, a skid plate, and great tires. Then you're ready for a tune.

My $.02
__________________
RC Stage 4: 11mm pump, 17/22, .230 nozzles, 3barMAP,EGR Delete, PD150Intake,SMIC,2.5" Exhaust: Koni Sp Reds, Wagon Springs, ~1"/2"lift:VR6 fr swaybar, Top strut & rear tie bar: 215/55ZR16 GMax AS05's, 10mm/20mm spacers, 35# @: skid plate: 02J, SBC2 End, .717 5th, Peloquin LSD, Fluidampr: TT Short Shifter: : VR6 fr, TT rr Brks
Rrusse11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Multifuntion Steering Wheel upgrade JettaTDIBlack VW MKIV-A4 TDIs (VE and PD) 7 December 26th, 2018 15:14
steering wheel upgrade.. forrest resto`s VW MKVI-A6 Jetta Sedan (~ 2011+) 9 October 13th, 2017 17:41
upgrade steering wheel OrangeToucano Upgrades (non TDI Engine related) 3 June 15th, 2013 19:08
Steering wheel upgrade?? chirishboy TDI 101 0 January 7th, 2010 12:15
Steering wheel upgrade on 2001 Jetta TDI question TDI_NC TDI 101 5 October 7th, 2006 19:41


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:03.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright - TDIClub Online LTD - 2017
Contact Us | Privacy Statement | Forum Rules | Disclaimer
TDIClub Online Ltd (TDIClub.com) is not affiliated with the VWoA or VWAG and is supported by contributions from viewers like you.
© 1996 - 2017, All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.16081 seconds with 13 queries
[Output: 84.49 Kb. compressed to 74.03 Kb. by saving 10.46 Kb. (12.38%)]